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F9 Ramper Run Over By Plane At DEN  
User currently offlineAviacentre From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 121 posts, RR: 0
Posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 19299 times:

A Frontier Ramp agent slipped on ice at Denver causing his leg to be run over by the aircraft's nose gear. Not the most pleasing topic to report on, but best of luck to him nonetheless!

Quote:
...a Frontier Airlines ramp agent was putting the wedges around the wheels of a plane to stop it at the gate.

The employee slipped on ice and the nose gear of the aircraft rolled over his leg, officials say.

Officials at DIA say the employee suffered a severe leg injury and was taken to the hospital, with assistance from paramedics at DIA.

Denver Post: http://test.denverpost.com/news/ci_4766264

[Edited 2006-12-04 01:15:52]


Proud Graduate of UND Aerospace
46 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineIndy From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 4595 posts, RR: 18
Reply 1, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 19238 times:

Ouch. I hope they are able to save his leg.


Indy = Indianapolis and not Independence Air
User currently offlineIloveboeing From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 803 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 19186 times:

Outch! I hope he's ok, as well.

User currently offlineHPLASOps From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 19146 times:

Quoting Aviacentre (Thread starter):
a Frontier Airlines ramp agent was putting the wedges around the wheels of a plane to stop it at the gate.

Sorry for this to happen to the ramper, but this does sound a little fishy. Why would the ramper be putting chocks ("wedges", WTF?) on a plane that was still moving? I could maybe understand if he/she was 3 feet or so, slipped, and because the entire area was icy, slipped all the way underneath the tires, but I would think that would a little extreme. US recently changed ramp safety procedures so that chocks can no longer be inside the safety circle while the plane was pulling into the gate. The chocks are to be brought in after the plane has come to a full stop. I don't know what F9's ground ops manual currently says about chock placement, but I'm sure this will cause them to review and adjust if necessary.


User currently offlineTUSaadvantage From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 160 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 19074 times:

With the ever increasing size of Americans, and all of that fancy F9 IFE, I would imagine that it would have hurt a great deal. It seems like ice related accidents should happen more often than they do. With 1000s of aircraft movements occuring at icey airports everyday, I would imagine lots of slippages and broken bones would happen. Anyway, I hope the guy's leg isn't permanently out of comission.

User currently offlineDavestanKSAN From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 1678 posts, RR: 13
Reply 5, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 18853 times:

 Sad ouch. Uggh I can't imagine how much that would hurt.

I remember one time when an aircraft pulled into the gate and I was putting the chocks on the nose gear. Well the plane stopped on the mark and I was on my way to put the chocks on and all of a suddent the aircraft started to roll forward. What had happened was the PIC's seat had slid back and his feet came off the brakes. So the F/O had to jump on them. It was scary for sure.

Anyway I hope this Ramper's leg is okay!!

Please be careful out there guys.

Dave



Yesterday we've sinned, today we move towards God. Touch the sky....love and respect...Safe Star!
User currently offlineFL370 From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 252 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 18259 times:

i dont' wanna imagine the pain the man is going through!! hope hes ok though.

best regards


fl370


User currently offlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 5126 posts, RR: 28
Reply 7, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 18035 times:

This is very sad news indeed. Anyone that gets hurt on the ramp is very hard, especially as close as the F9 ramp is as a team. The most powerful message sent in this incident is, that the ramp job is a dangerous job. In icy conditions, it is beyond important to use extra caution. I WOULD IMAGINE that the ramper was chocking the forward nose gear, and if the ramper was holding the chocks in the arms or hands, it adds extra top body weight. In that case, a slip on ice increases the lower body momentum. I was carrying chocks once on a slippery deicing fluid on the ground, and took a slip that almost caused a back injury (not with Frontier btw). Thank goodness the aircraft was not pulling into the gate, as we were just setting up for an arrival. I am obviously taking a guess at the situation, as I have no idea on how it happened. Without knowing the specifics, I have always frowned upon anyone standing in the circle of safety when an aircraft is approaching the line.

I certainly hope the ramper is okay, and I hope for a speedy recovery. Most importantly, I hope his leg is given a clean bill of health.

HP had a few unfortunate cases, but IIRC the leg injuries happened during pushback. These situations cause good argument to those that think the ramp job is easy. Rampers earn every penny and dime on the job.

[Edited 2006-12-04 05:51:02]


I Am A Different Animal!!
User currently offlineLightsaber From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 13551 posts, RR: 100
Reply 8, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17846 times:
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I wish the ramper the best.

Aircraft are dangerous and unfortunately this punctuated that. The shear weight and energy involved with any movement of a mainline airframe is impressive...

I hope this individual has a full recovery.

Lightsaber



Societies that achieve a critical mass of ideas achieve self sustaining growth; others stagnate.
User currently offlineFXramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 7366 posts, RR: 85
Reply 9, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17828 times:
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We don't let anyone go inside the line before the beacons go off...plane is parked and brakes applied.

I hope the airline doesn't try to withhold any funds for hospitalization.

 Sad


User currently offlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 5126 posts, RR: 28
Reply 10, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17834 times:

Quoting HPLASOps (Reply 3):
I don't know what F9's ground ops manual currently says about chock placement, but I'm sure this will cause them to review and adjust if necessary.

F9 has the same protocol as HP/US when chocking aircraft. Unfortunately, sometimes procedures get forgotten, especially when rampers get comfortable with the job. When you work a gazillion flights, one tends to get fancy or get rushed, and sometimes fancy and rushing can get one hurt. I say this, because any injury I have ever faced was because I was too comfortable, and did not follow procedure. Another injury as a great example was when I hurt my back. I did not bend at the knees, because it was a wimpy little duffel bag. Sadly, the duffel bag was full of bowling balls. OUCH!!! The result of the investigation found fault on my part, and I learned a valuable lesson. Luckily, every lesson I have ever learned, found me recovering fully.



I Am A Different Animal!!
User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets87 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17748 times:

Quoting Aviacentre (Thread starter):
Quote:
...a Frontier Airlines ramp agent was putting the wedges around the wheels of a plane to stop it at the gate.

The employee slipped on ice and the nose gear of the aircraft rolled over his leg, officials say.

Officials at DIA say the employee suffered a severe leg injury and was taken to the hospital, with assistance from paramedics at DIA.

Now I don't want to jump to conclusions, because I know how much the media sucks at reporting aviation-related stories like not knowing the difference between a gate and a runway. But if this part of the story is true, what was the guy doing trying to chock the aircraft while it was still moving?   

Quoting TUSaadvantage (Reply 4):
With the ever increasing size of Americans, and all of that fancy F9 IFE

Because getting run over by a plane weighing 110,000 lbs. hurts so much less getting run over by a plane weighing 115,000 lbs.   

*Edited for spelling and grammar

[Edited 2006-12-04 06:31:47]

User currently offlineFXramper From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 7366 posts, RR: 85
Reply 12, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17693 times:
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Quoting F9Animal (Reply 10):
procedures get forgotten

this could come back to haunt the employee if it was his fault...  no 

again, I'm sorry to hear about it, hope the employee is okay.


User currently offlineEmiratesA345 From Canada, joined Jun 2003, 2123 posts, RR: 8
Reply 13, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17488 times:

Quoting Indy (Reply 1):
Ouch. I hope they are able to save his leg.

If the wheel rolled right over his leg like I'm imagining, then the leg is gone.

A friend of mine was telling me what a bus did to a woman's head when the rear duals rolled over it. "Flat as piss on a plate," he described it as.

If a 30,000 lb. transit bus did that, this airplane would have done far worse or the same, assuming that the wheel rolled right over his leg.

Mark



You and I were meant to fly, Air Canada!
User currently offlineLitz From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1788 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 17372 times:
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One thing those of y'all who don't work around real heavy stuff have to realize is how careful you have to be at all times ...

We railroaders have a rule : always expect the train to move. Period.

It's simply the best and safest way to deal with something that's far larger, and far heavier than you are.

And trains don't have nice rubber tires like airplanes, trucks, and busses do.

This sounds like an unfortunate accident ... a terrible reminder that everyone has to be careful at all times, regardless of what kind of transportation industry you work in ...

Y'all think twice before you move, and be extra careful on that ice ...

- litz


User currently offlinePhatfarmlines From United States of America, joined Sep 2001, 1363 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 17226 times:

Quoting TUSaadvantage (Reply 4):
With the ever increasing size of Americans, and all of that fancy F9 IFE, I would imagine that it would have hurt a great deal.

I don't think it would make any difference if it was with or without payload.


User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25698 posts, RR: 85
Reply 16, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 17205 times:
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Really sad news.

I haven't been anle to find anything more in the press since that first item - anyone heard anything?

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineUnited777atGU From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 183 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 17026 times:

I, too, wish the F9 ramper the best during this traumatic time... I think most people have covered what I would like to say.

I do want to make a comment on one of my greatest worries: hydraulic fluid and planes collapsing. You know those pics in the database with planes on their booties (butt) or noses? That can be caused by hydraulic fluid, among other causes. I always fear that when I walk under a plane (any plane of course, but particularly under widebodies--767, 777, 747), it will just collapse the moment I get right in the middle and I won't be able to run away. In the winter, we all (not all, but most of us at UA IADCG) like to go under the plane to warm up because it shoots out such hot air! It feels good when its about 0 degrees F outside!!

I wish the guy a speedy recovery. GB.



Speechless
User currently offlineHAWK21M From India, joined Jan 2001, 31712 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 16950 times:

Shouldn't the chocks be put in place after Engines are shutdown.
regds
MEL



Think of the brighter side!
User currently offlineScottieprecord From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 1363 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 16800 times:

I can't imagine the plane ran fully over the leg unless it had decent forward momentum... in which case, the ramper would not have been close to the gear.

Perhaps the plane shifted a bit, normally absorbed by the chocks, but the ramper's leg was there instead?? I don't know... this report just doesn't sound right as is.


User currently offlineDCrawley From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 371 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 16686 times:

Quoting EmiratesA345 (Reply 13):
A friend of mine was telling me what a bus did to a woman's head when the rear duals rolled over it. "Flat as piss on a plate," he described it as.

I pray that no one has to EVER see something like that. In July or August I witnessed a 54 year old man, on I-5 mile marker 79 or 80 (you can find the report on the Washington State Trooper's website under press releases), riding his Harley Davidson 1 car length in front of me have his brakes lock at 80 miles per hour and his motorcycle flip with his head and right arm landing under the rear duals of a semi truck. I skidded through his brain and part of his remaining body in my new Silverado. I can only imagine what the front gear of a jet would do to your body. I pray for this F9 worker.



"Weather at our destination is 50 degrees with some broken clouds, but they'll try to have them fixed before we arrive."
User currently offlineVonRichtofen From Canada, joined Nov 2000, 4638 posts, RR: 36
Reply 21, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 16047 times:

Quoting F9Animal (Reply 10):
The result of the investigation found fault on my part, and I learned a valuable lesson. Luckily, every lesson I have ever learned, found me recovering fully.

Did the check in agents place a "heavy" warning tag on the bag? If not, then you're not at fault.

Kris



Word
User currently offlineFlyDreamliner From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2759 posts, RR: 15
Reply 22, posted (8 years 3 weeks 2 days ago) and read 15751 times:

Quoting FXramper (Reply 9):
I hope the airline doesn't try to withhold any funds for hospitalization.

I really hope so too. I would hope they would feel for this guy, who is a member of their family, and this being the holidays.

Quoting Phatfarmlines (Reply 15):
Quoting TUSaadvantage (Reply 4):
With the ever increasing size of Americans, and all of that fancy F9 IFE, I would imagine that it would have hurt a great deal.

I don't think it would make any difference if it was with or without payload.

I think a 140 passenger aircraft is sufficiently larger in proportion to a human leg that it doesn't matter if it if loaded or not.

I wish this guy, who was just doing his best at his job, the speediest of recoveries and best of wishes. Even if he got fancy and careless in his job, he was doing the best he could, trying to get the job done as quick as he could, as I'm sure he was busy. I think we will need more facts on this to truly understand exactly what happened anyhow.



"Let the world change you, and you can change the world"
User currently offlineKaddyuk From Wallis and Futuna, joined Nov 2001, 4126 posts, RR: 25
Reply 23, posted (8 years 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 15483 times:

I'm sure the guy wasn't stupid enough to chock the aircraft while it was moving. rather he walked up to the airframe ready for when it did stop.

A British Airways engineer in South Africa not too long ago had the same happen, the main wheel rolled over his leg after he fell over infront of the approaching aircraft. They had to amputate his leg.

I'm always cautious when approaching a moving aircraft but no one should start calling this guy an idiot unless they were there and knew exactly what the guy was trying to do.



Whoever said "laughter is the best medicine" never had Gonorrhea
User currently offlineSpootter10 From Germany, joined Aug 2000, 77 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (8 years 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 15356 times:

Quoting DCrawley (Reply 20):
I skidded through his brain and part of his remaining body in my new Silverado.

 no  What an appropraite comment......


25 Gary2880 : Just lucky the aircraft didn't think they reached the chocks and stopped on on top of his leg. obviously the pilots wouldn't be able to see the poor g
26 Skyexramper : Much luck to the poor guy, hope he is better than ever shortly. I once had a fully fueled 172P run my foot over cause it rolled back on me while I was
27 AceFreighter : Kaddyuk - it was actually a South African Airways engineer who fell under the wheels of a BA 747 arriving in JNB. He was walking under the aircraft wh
28 MiCorazonAzul : More than likely he started to approach the A/C as it was pulling in. At that point , probably slipped right at the same time as the A/C was close to
29 Nkops : the most dangerous part of any job (especially when working around machinery) can be repetition. Doing the same thing over and over, you can sometime
30 Goldenshield : The strange thing about monotonous repetition is that while things pretty much become second nature to you, you are put in a very dangerous position
31 Hiflyer : First off does F9 leave brakes set while on blox or release breaks once the chocks are in? Some carriers leave them set...other carriers release them
32 Falstaff : My dad is in the railroad business and not only does he follow that rule, but also assume every track is active. I used to work with and around railr
33 Jetset7E7 : The procedure we have at Swissport at MAN, is that chocks are put in once engines have been shut down, and beacon switched off. Then the "chocks in" s
34 USPIT10L : I've slipped on the ramp myself as well. We also were setting up for an arrival. Once it happened just before the plane was coming to the gate. I fel
35 Post contains links Mariner : Not surprisingly, his leg was broken. He is expected to be "alright": http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/10454612/detail.html That's the only press
36 A330300 : F9 leaves the brakes on after chocks are in. What may have happened is these two things simultaneously: *The ramper may have been in walking in place
37 Halcyon : My dad ran my leg over in our Subaru once and that was bad enough. Poor guy. Must have sucked pretty bad. Glad to hear he'll get better.
38 F9Animal : Oh yes, there is nothing worse than having no ability to stop the fall either. I slipped on ice on the ramp once, and by the time I realized I was fa
39 TWAL1011727 : I bet he was moving towards the nose gear and realized that he was either too close to the A/C or the A/C went beyond the stop point ....he stopped h
40 JayDub : I just cringed when I read the topic. What happened this F9 ramper is one of the two worst nightmares of anyone who has ever worked ramp service (the
41 Richm : And to think I was moaning about the cramp I was getting in my leg the other day! Poor guy, hope he is ok.
42 Post contains images Badlydrawnboy : I can't count the number of crews that won't shut down the remaining running engine (here, with CO, Engine 1) until the nosegear (at the very least)
43 Vref5 : So... out of curiosity, how do you resolve that issue when it comes up?
44 HAWK21M : Out here SOP is Brakes on....Chocks in place....Brakes released. regds MEL
45 Post contains images CRJonBeez : i hope the F9 ramper recovers. very unfortunate. no matter how many times you do something, there's always a possibility that it all goes wrong. you s
46 MiCorazonAzul : Yea, at JB the #2 engine is always off making it safer when approaching. We do it also as a fuel saving technique....A/C taxi in on one engine (#1).
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