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Whats After The 7-7's For Boeings Planes  
User currently offlineT773ER From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 277 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4209 times:

I got to thinking, after the 797, there are no more 7-7's to be used. What will Boeing do, maybe the 878, or 888. They do seem to be using the 8 alot (787 747-8).


"Fixed fortifications are monuments to the stupidity of man."
21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSkyvanMan From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 224 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 9 hours ago) and read 4155 times:

I remember reading somewhere that they are using 8 on the 747-8 to show that it has technological advancements like the 787 in terms of fuel efficiency and stuff but as to the question at hand I have no idea but as you point out they are using 8 alot and the only other option that is obvious and gives the idea of newer (rather than going backiwards and having 1-1 or something) is going to 8 or 9.


The 3 best planes of all time: Shorts Skyvan, 330 and 360
User currently offlineBWIA 772 From Barbados, joined May 2002, 2200 posts, RR: 2
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4092 times:

I think that this has been discussed before. I think they covered for a little while though. 797 will go to the 737 replacement and it is kinda fitting. The 777 is only down to 300 so there is room. IMHO if they come out with a supersonic jet or the BWB they should start the 808 with that.


Eagles Soar!
User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4079 times:

I belive the SST was designated as 2707 -- so there is a precedent for x7x7 as a model number.

User currently offlinePlanesailing From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2005, 815 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4044 times:

Isnt the 8 also symbolic? As far as I am aware, it is seen as lucky in Asia.

User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12061 posts, RR: 52
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4021 times:

Boeing's next, expected, projects are tentively called the Y-1, Y-2, and Y-3. Y-1 will be the narrow body replacement (that is not to say it is a narrow body), while the Y-3 will replace Boeing's biggest jets, the B-777 and B-747.

Now, the number 8 seems to be a "lucky" number in some Asian cultures, which is one reason why the A-380, next B-747, B-787, and A-350 are starting their submodel numbers with "8", or "800". Since the Chinese market is expected to be very big over the next 25-30 years, this is probibly just a marketing scheme by both manufactures.

But, for Boeing, they may skip the B-797 designation and go right into the B-800 series, beginning with the Y-1.

Quoting NoWorries (Reply 3):
I belive the SST was designated as 2707 -- so there is a precedent for x7x7 as a model number.

That is correct, but I doubt Boeing will now go to a four number designation. I might add Lockheed had gotten to four number designations (L-1049, L-1011, etc.).


User currently offlineLostturttle From Bermuda, joined Dec 2006, 140 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 4007 times:

Quoting Planesailing (Reply 4):
Isnt the 8 also symbolic? As far as I am aware, it is seen as lucky in Asia.

While in the west 7 is seen as a lucky number, I believe you are correct that in the east 8 or 9 is seen as being lucky. Now the number 4............thats another story


User currently offline7cubed From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 161 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 3990 times:

Quoting Planesailing (Reply 4):
Isnt the 8 also symbolic? As far as I am aware, it is seen as lucky in Asia.

You're correct, the number 8 is revered in most asian countries as a lucky number. I believe boeing and airbus, knowing the importance of the asian aviation market, will use the number 8 quite often. I won't speculate as to what a/c replacement gets what number but wouldn't be suprised if y1 ends up being the 838. I guess time will tell.



joe
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5639 posts, RR: 11
Reply 8, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3880 times:

All of you are thinking WAY inside the box.... they're not out of 7x7 designations at all....
The Arabic numeral system we use is brilliant in that it has no limitations...

7-10-7, 7-11-7, etc...

 Smile


User currently offlineFoppishbum From Taiwan, joined Mar 2006, 788 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3857 times:

Quoting Planesailing (Reply 4):
Isnt the 8 also symbolic? As far as I am aware, it is seen as lucky in Asia.

The number 8 has the almost same pronunciation as "getting rich" or "richness" (if there's such a word). The Chinese character for it is 發 (fa) 8 is pronounced (ba).

I wonder if they'll start using alphabets (ex. 7A7, 7B7...etc). 7X7 sounds so SciFi!  silly 


foppishbum



I'm a TAIWANESE-American living in NYC and LA.
User currently offlineFlyHoss From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 598 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3857 times:

Quoting Planesailing (Reply 4):
Isnt the 8 also symbolic? As far as I am aware, it is seen as lucky in Asia.


When Boeing was pursuing Chinese orders for the 7E7, I wondered if they'd rename it the 808. As we all know, it instead became the 787.



A little bit louder now, a lil bit louder now...
User currently offlineOB1504 From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 3236 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 3857 times:

Or we could see the advent of the Boeing 807. I doubt Boeing will ever go to model numbers not ending with "7", since all of their commercial aircraft with the excpetion of the 720 (which was itself a variant of the 707) have had their model numbers end in "7".

User currently offlineCroCop From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3800 times:

I think they will start using letter between the 7-7's Like 7E7, and such.

User currently offlineT773ER From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 277 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3798 times:

I like the sound of putting letters in between the 7-7.


"Fixed fortifications are monuments to the stupidity of man."
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6482 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3734 times:

Quoting T773ER (Reply 13):
I like the sound of putting letters in between the 7-7.

Well, 7E7, 7J7, and 7N7 are already in use.



When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' T.Roosevelt
User currently offlineToiletboy99999 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 3711 times:

I think they are using the 747-8 designator because isnt it using 787 technology (engines)?

User currently offlineT773ER From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 277 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3389 times:

I hope the planes continue to end with 7, other wise it just wouldn't be the same.


"Fixed fortifications are monuments to the stupidity of man."
User currently offlineDfwRevolution From United States of America, joined Jan 2010, 914 posts, RR: 51
Reply 17, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 3359 times:

Quoting N328KF (Reply 14):
Well, 7E7, 7J7, and 7N7 are already in use.

They are not in use per say, but they have been used as temporary designations in the past.

Quoting KC135TopBoom (Reply 5):
Now, the number 8 seems to be a "lucky" number in some Asian cultures, which is one reason why the A-380, next B-747, B-787, and A-350 are starting their submodel numbers with "8", or "800".

There were several reasons:

- Airbus claims to have named the A3XX the A380 because the numeral 8 also represented a double fuselage.

- Naming the 7E7 the 787 was simply the most conservative and logical choice given the Boeing legacy since the 707. If the OEM had such a boner for the number 8, you would have seen the 808, which was a serious contender at one point.

- Boeing claims to have named the base 787 variant the -8 because 8,000 nm became the baseline range target for new generation aircraft. Note that the 3,500 nm 787 (initially 7E7-SR) became the -3.

- Boeing likely followed this trend for the 8,000 nm 747-Advanced

- Airbus likely had no intention of being upstaged in marketing, and named the new A350 variants the -800 and -900 respectively. There is a precedent for this: the JT9D version of the DC-10 was suppose to be named the DC-10-20, but Pratt didn't want to seem inferior to the Ge DC-10-30. Thus, Pratt was given the title DC-10-40.

- And of course, the cultural significance to the Asian culture probably helped seal the deal. I think people over-rate this aspect, however. The 787-9 and A350-900 will likely be more popular variants in Asia anyway, and neither the A380-800 or 747-8I are high volume sellers.


User currently offlineGrantcv From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 429 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 3297 times:

Quoting N328KF (Reply 14):
Well, 7E7, 7J7, and 7N7 are already in use.

The 7X7 became the Boeing 767.

I think that Boeing should go through the sequence 797, 1707, 1717, 1727, ... and when they get back to doing a supersonic in about 100 years they can call it the 2707. They already have a design for the 2707 so with a little updating, they will be set.


User currently offlineMptpa From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 541 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 3247 times:

Perhaps Y1 will become 797 and start with 808 for Y3. 8 is lucky is in Asia so it would be good!!

User currently offlineAA777223 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1219 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3184 times:

I think 7107 would also be a nice option.


Sic 'em bears
User currently offlineYVRLTN From Canada, joined Oct 2006, 2347 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 4 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 3114 times:

Quoting AA737-823 (Reply 8):
7-11-7, etc...

Hmm, might make people think they can buy them from their local store with their slurpy...  Cool



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