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J'Accuse! Conspiracy To Tank Dollar Unmasked!  
User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5968 times:

Mister Gallois seems to think something fishy is going on in currency policy....



http://today.reuters.com/news/articl...LLAR-UPDATE-1.XML&rpc=66&type=qcna

 razz   razz   razz 

60 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMDorBust From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5959 times:

Yes, it's all a giant economic conspiracy to cripple Airbus and prop up Boeing!!!111!!

User currently offlineDougloid From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5922 times:

Quoting MDorBust (Reply 1):
Yes, it's all a giant economic conspiracy to cripple Airbus and prop up Boeing!!!111!!

Kind of sounds like Humphrey Bogart as Captain Queeg in "The Caine Mutiny", doesn't it? or maybe Jimmy Cagney in "Mister Roberts"?



        

[Edited 2006-12-05 02:19:14]

User currently offlineSprout5199 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1833 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5922 times:

This is ridiculous. Like Boeing is the only exporter in the US. And a sitting president wants a Strong dollar so people can buy lots of things, and go on vacation to Europe. Sounds like whining to me. If I cant make a successful product I will blame everyone else. The "Its not my fault" syndrome. He must have went to school here in the states.

Dan in Jupiter


User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 4, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5860 times:
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Quoting Dougloid (Thread starter):
Mister Gallois seems to think something fishy is going on in currency policy....

Conspiracy? M. Gallois does not say there is something "fishy" going on.

The US dollar is presently "weak" and likely to remain so. That fact may make some investors very rich.

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8LQ7VA80.htm

"Wall Street has a secret that nobody really wants to admit: Many are cheering the dollar's slide to near 20-month lows against other major currencies."

M. Gallois is simply stating the facts of what a weak dollar does to Airbus.

???

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinePolymerPlane From United States of America, joined May 2006, 991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5860 times:

Nothing to back up his statement. I am now accusing of south pole nation of stealing my jeans from my laundry room.  Silly

Cheers,
PP



One day there will be 100% polymer plane
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 6, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 5833 times:
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Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 5):
Nothing to back up his statement.

There's a great deal to back up his statement. Try a Google search:

http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en...AK+DOLLAR&btnG=Google+Search&meta=

???

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinePolymerPlane From United States of America, joined May 2006, 991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5790 times:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 6):
There's a great deal to back up his statement. Try a Google search:

??? What are you trying to say? I don't have time to read 4 million pages. If you have something to say, just say it.

The fact is that US government can only control fiscal policy, while the Fed controls the monetary policy. US dollar is a free floating currency, not like china's yuan. Weak dollar is here because of trade deficit, which cannot be compensated by foreign investment. I guess US government can strengthen dollars with higher tariff to deter imports, but I bet EU won't be too thrill about it.

Cheers,
PP



One day there will be 100% polymer plane
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 8, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5758 times:
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Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 7):
??? What are you trying to say? I don't have time to read 4 million pages. If you have something to say, just say it.

I said it. There is a great deal to back up his statement.

Many countries - through their reserve banks - adopt a strong or weak monetary policy, in the case of the US, the Fed. In Britain, it would be the Bank of England. This may be separate from political policy.

Raising or lowering interest rates to keep a currency, any currency, within a perceived desirable range is common practise.

???

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineAtmx2000 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 4576 posts, RR: 38
Reply 9, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5734 times:

Quoting Sprout5199 (Reply 3):
This is ridiculous. Like Boeing is the only exporter in the US. And a sitting president wants a Strong dollar so people can buy lots of things, and go on vacation to Europe.

While that is certainly a short term advantage of a strong currency, the long term consequence is loss of jobs in any sector of the economy exposed to foreign competition. And a sitting president doesn't want high unemployment rates. It's my view that the high dollar choked the US economy in 2000, causing the 2001 recession, and ensuring at least another year of weakness in 2002-2003 until the dollar started to move towards the proper valuation level.

And why would an American president want people to go on vacation in Europe? It would be far better for a politician if they stayed in country, spending money and boosting the US tourism industry.

Quoting Mariner (Reply 4):
Conspiracy? M. Gallois does not say there is something "fishy" going on.

The US dollar is presently "weak" and likely to remain so. That fact may make some investors very rich.

He is accusing the US of practicing a weak dollar policy. But all it is doing is allowing the currency to float. Neither the US government nor the Federal Reserve is buying or selling other currencies to manipulate the dollar value, and it is not locking the currency value to any other currency. The truth of the matter is that the Asian countries that keep their currencies low against the dollar are trying to prevent their currencies from rising and damaging the competitiveness of their manufacturing sectors.

Frankly, the problem is Airbus got used to an extremely overvalued dollar that made it more competitive. Now it doesn't have that prop so it can't win deals on price. What is probably a bigger danger for them is what a weaker dollar would do to the profits from the 1000s of A320s on order if a significant fraction of them are priced in dollars.



ConcordeBoy is a twin supremacist!! He supports quadicide!!
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 10, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5699 times:
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Quoting Atmx2000 (Reply 9):
Neither the US government nor the Federal Reserve is buying or selling other currencies to manipulate the dollar value, and it is not locking the currency value to any other currency.

They also do it by interest rates.

To remove it from the US, New Zealand presently has a "strong dollar" official (reserve bank) policy - paying high interest rates - to attact foreign investment, of which this country needs a great deal.

This is unfortunate for me because all of my income comes from the US. When the NZ dollar was "weak" (official policy/low interest rates), I got many more NZ dollars each month.

Quoting Atmx2000 (Reply 9):
the problem is Airbus got used to an extremely overvalued dollar that made it more competitive.

Isn't that precisely what M. Gallois is saying?

???

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinePolymerPlane From United States of America, joined May 2006, 991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5689 times:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 8):
I said it. There is a great deal to back up his statement.

Many countries - through their reserve banks - adopt a strong or weak monetary policy, in the case of the US, the Fed. In Britain, it would be the Bank of England. This may be separate from political policy.

Raising or lowering interest rates to keep a currency, any currency, within a perceived desirable range is common practise.

???

3 Flaws:

1. US interest rate is at one of its highest point in the recent history, which means the US dollar should be stronger.
2. The Fed sets its policy regardless of political reasons. So, weak dollar has nothing to do with Airbus-Boeing competition. It is more of global US economy policy.
3. Gallois said that Airbus believes weak dollar is not cyclical. This means, regardless what the Fed sets, US dollars will be weak in the long run. The Fed can only control the short run.

from the fed website:

Quote:
The forex market is essentially governed by the law of supply and demand and is generally not regulated by any government or coalition of governments. This is true in the U.S., where participation in the forex market is not regulated. The prices set for each country's money is determined by the desire of those trading to acquire more of it or to hold less of it. Each individual acts on the belief that he or she will benefit from the transaction.

http://www.chicagofed.org/consumer_i...tion/strong_dollar_weak_dollar.cfm

You can see one of the reason of strong currency is high interest rate in home country, which is the case of current Fed policy. Just a while ago, US interest rate is in the order of 0.25%, while it is at around 5% (IIRC) right now.

Quote:
Factors Contributing to a Strong Currency:

*Higher interest rates in home country than abroad

Cheers,
PP



One day there will be 100% polymer plane
User currently offlinePolymerPlane From United States of America, joined May 2006, 991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5660 times:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 10):
Isn't that precisely what M. Gallois is saying?

No, this is what they're saying

Quote:
European plane maker Airbus accused Washington on Monday of pursuing a weak dollar policy as a parliamentary transcript revealed the plane maker was preparing for the U.S. currency to remain below $1.30 for a long time.

and

The company is trying to rebuild its (currency) hedges on the basis of $1.30 to a euro because it doesn't consider this situation ... is cyclical."

http://today.reuters.com/news/articl...LLAR-UPDATE-1.XML&rpc=66&type=qcna

Which is nonsense, because a government cannot set long term currency policy.

Cheers,
PP



One day there will be 100% polymer plane
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 13, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5659 times:
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Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 11):
1. US interest rate is at one of its highest point in the recent history, which means the US dollar should be stronger.

"Should"? Yes. If interest rates were the only metric. But in a complex economy, it is never just one thing. The US deficit has a great deal to do with the state of the US dollar.

It also has to do with the relationship with other currencies , such as the yen.

http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D8LQ7VA80.htm

If you really want a debate about Keynes or Friedman, I am happy to do so, but I don't think this is the place. I will - more happily and at the same time - defend M. Gallois against conspiracy theories, such as this thread.

Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 11):
Factors Contributing to a Strong Currency:

*Higher interest rates in home country than abroad

Is that not what I just said about New Zealand?

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineSprout5199 From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 1833 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5638 times:

Quoting Atmx2000 (Reply 9):
And why would an American president want people to go on vacation in Europe? It would be far better for a politician if they stayed in country, spending money and boosting the US tourism industry

If that was true, then a President wants a weak dollar so other people come here and spend their money.

I dated an Econ. major for a while. Was the scariest thing. She tried to explain some stuff but I just kept putting "real world" things into her discussion. the words "does not compute" kept coming into my head. Its all BS. basically it boils down to what you want to sell for and what I want to buy for. Doesn't matter if we exchange $ or piles of crap. Every thing else is one country trying to do better for their people and screwing everyone else. Like a Govt. should.

Dan in Jupiter


User currently offlinePolymerPlane From United States of America, joined May 2006, 991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5604 times:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 13):
"Should"? Yes. If interest rates were the only metric. But in a complex economy, it is never just one thing. The US deficit has a great deal to do with the state of the US dollar.

It also has to do with the relationship with other currencies , such as the yen.

That's what I have been trying to say. There's no weak dollar policy from Washington as Airbus accussed.

I know that US dollars depend on other economic parameters, and other currencies. I just want to say that the weak dollar has nothing to do with current Washington policy. It's all because the trade deficit US has endured for a while now.

Washington can actually set a strong dollar policy by limiting import. That policy will be against free trade spirit, and I am sure EU will cry foul if Washington adapts that policy.

Quoting Mariner (Reply 13):
Is that not what I just said about New Zealand?

This is what u said:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 8):
Many countries - through their reserve banks - adopt a strong or weak monetary policy, in the case of the US, the Fed. In Britain, it would be the Bank of England. This may be separate from political policy.

Raising or lowering interest rates to keep a currency, any currency, within a perceived desirable range is common practise.

When I was trying to say that the Fed is not adopting weak dollar policy to rebut the Airbus's statement that that Washington sets weak dollar policy.

Cheers,
PP



One day there will be 100% polymer plane
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 16, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 5599 times:
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Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 12):
No, this is what they're saying

Did M. Gallois use the word "accuse" - or did the reporter? Or again, does it matter, since many outside the US may believe it to be true? Why single out M. Gallois?

Clearly, many believe that the dollar is "weak" - and as many believe it will lead to higher interest rates - which would be Fed policy. Why else does Wall Street hang on the interest rate decisions of the Fed?

http://stocks.about.com/od/advancedtrading/a/weakdoll120604.htm

Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 12):
Which is nonsense, because a government cannot set long term currency policy.

A Reserve Bank can and often does - see NZ above - set long term currency policy. Whether it has the blessing of the government in office is another matter.

Quoting Sprout5199 (Reply 14):
Every thing else is one country trying to do better for their people and screwing everyone else. Like a Govt. should.

 checkmark 

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlinePar13del From Bahamas, joined Dec 2005, 6744 posts, RR: 8
Reply 17, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5579 times:

Well the EU is proud of its Euro and how well it has done since being launched.
If they believe that the US Govt. is "playing around" with its currency to give Boeing some other subsidy and penalize Airbus at the same time, why not switch to the Euro which they control. The world no longer turns around the US as the EU has a same size or bigger economy, so unless its difficult to switch products already sold, can they not sell all new products in Euros, is this not already a long term strategy, for the Euro to be an alternative currency for world trade, why not start with the pinnacle of European consolidation.


User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 18, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5566 times:

Gallois had better put the blame where it belongs - on the EU in Brussels.

The basic mistake was to introduce a common currency and a uniform approach to economic management continent-wide. It was absurd even to imagine that the same currency value, interest rates, and public expenditure regime would at all times suit every country between the English Channel and the Balkans.

The really crucial 'wrong turning' was demanding that every country, regardless of its year-to-year economic situation, should at all times avoid 'deficit spending.' Balancing the books of a given country inevitably results in a 'strong' currency; but it leaves the government powerless to spend its way out of a situation of structural unemployment. That is the situation facing virtually all the countries that signed up to the Euro.



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24656 posts, RR: 86
Reply 19, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5566 times:
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Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 15):
Washington can actually set a strong dollar policy by limiting import.

So - they can set a "strong dollar" policy, but they can set a "weak dollar" policy?

Then again, you just said:

Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 12):
because a government cannot set long term currency policy.

???

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineAtmx2000 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 4576 posts, RR: 38
Reply 20, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5502 times:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 10):
They also do it by interest rates.

Only indirectly. The Federal Reserve sets interest rates based on inflation or pricing data that is an indication of inflation to try and slow the expansion of the money supply. But as a side effect it pulls foreign investors in, propping up the currency and keeping prices for imported goods low, which feeds back into the pricing data.

Quoting Par13del (Reply 17):
Well the EU is proud of its Euro and how well it has done since being launched.

Well when the Euro was launched at the beginning of 1999, the Euro went into a nose dive from $1.18 to something in the range of $0.83 at its low in 2000 or 2001. Publically, the EU ministers were distressed, but I'd bet they were secretly happy as Europe's chronic high unemployment started to decrease as the Euro weakened. As the Euro strengthened unemployment has gone up.

Quoting Par13del (Reply 17):
If they believe that the US Govt. is "playing around" with its currency to give Boeing some other subsidy and penalize Airbus at the same time, why not switch to the Euro which they control. The world no longer turns around the US as the EU has a same size or bigger economy, so unless its difficult to switch products already sold, can they not sell all new products in Euros, is this not already a long term strategy, for the Euro to be an alternative currency for world trade, why not start with the pinnacle of European consolidation.

The only thing this does is switch the currency risk from Airbus to the customer, who now has to worry that he will have to pay more in his home currency if the Euro appreciates. But all new contracts will still be disadvantaged by the stronger currency, as Boeing was disadvantaged by the strong dollar.

Quoting Sprout5199 (Reply 14):
If that was true, then a President wants a weak dollar so other people come here and spend their money.

Sure, if a strong dollar is an impediment. In reality, a politician wants a happy middle that doesn't choke the productive side of the economy and the consumptive side of the economy.

Quoting PolymerPlane (Reply 15):
Washington can actually set a strong dollar policy by limiting import

I would suggest lowering taxes on production (payroll taxes and perhaps corporate income taxes) and raising consumption taxes. This will put domestic producers in a better position, and slow down consumption of goods. Hopefully, the increased taxation of domesticly produced goods will be offset by the reduction of taxation for the production of those goods. Meanwhile, the imported goods will be taxed at a higher rate. The problem with this of course is that would make life difficult for all those retailers who built all those big box stores that sell imported goods, as well as their employees.



ConcordeBoy is a twin supremacist!! He supports quadicide!!
User currently offlinePolymerPlane From United States of America, joined May 2006, 991 posts, RR: 3
Reply 21, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5496 times:

Quoting Mariner (Reply 19):
So - they can set a "strong dollar" policy, but they can set a "weak dollar" policy?

Then again, you just said:

I chose the wrong term. Of course a government can set a policy, but not within the free trade spirit. China is setting weak yuan policy by artifically setting a foreign exchange rate to dollar, and buying all the available dollar in the domestic market.

The US government however does not set monetary policy, thus putting the blame on washington is ridiculous.

Quoting Mariner (Reply 16):
Did M. Gallois use the word "accuse" - or did the reporter? Or again, does it matter, since many outside the US may believe it to be true? Why single out M. Gallois?

Clearly, many believe that the dollar is "weak" - and as many believe it will lead to higher interest rates - which would be Fed policy. Why else does Wall Street hang on the interest rate decisions of the Fed?

Like I said before, weak dollar is because of economic condition, tied with export-import and investment. Fed policy is a respond to weak dollar, not the cause of the weak dollar.

I still fail to see how does Washington has anything to do with weak dollar.

Quoting Mariner (Reply 16):
Did M. Gallois use the word "accuse" - or did the reporter? Or again, does it matter, since many outside the US may believe it to be true? Why single out M. Gallois?

Here's another quote:

Quote:
The dollar problem for Airbus has "taken on a completely new dimension because of the United States' deliberate weak-dollar policy," Gallois told LCI television.

http://in.today.reuters.com/news/New...NOOTR_RTRJONC_0_India-278944-2.xml

Why does it matter what other people think about US and the state of dollars. Gallois should act as a CEO, not as a analysts or politician and face the reality that dollar is weak, and build strategy around it. Accusing US' deliberate weak-dollar policy is neither accomplishing anything nor productive to Airbus.

Cheers,
PP



One day there will be 100% polymer plane
User currently offlineSJCRRPAX From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 5484 times:

The U.S. has a trade defecit with almost every country in the world. Obviously, it needs to go even lower so Gallois is smart to try to live with it.

User currently offlineJacobin777 From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 14968 posts, RR: 60
Reply 23, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 5440 times:

"European plane maker Airbus accused Washington on Monday of pursuing a weak dollar policy as a parliamentary transcript revealed the plane maker was preparing for the U.S. currency to remain below $1.30 for a long time."

I trade currency (amongst other things) for a living..this comment has to be one of the most asinine comments I've read in years.... rotfl 

Currency market isn't going to be manipulated just so Boeing could potentially win a few more sales.

Its a global market place and the market dictates what currency values should be. Sure there can be some short-term manipulation, but that has never shown to be viable over a longer period of time (such as what is happening right now)..

Also, a lot of Airbus parts are manufactured in the United States, while many of Boeing parts are built in Europe as well as other parts of the world....

Just unbelievable...



"Up the Irons!"
User currently offlineDjw030468 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 50 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 4 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 5438 times:

Quoting Dougloid (Thread starter):

It's all our fault...weaking dollar, global warming, increasing hurricanes and terrorism. The truth is revealed! Gosh I'm glad that's off my chest :p


25 Baron95 : Gallois should just lobby the EU to drop the Euro and adopt the US Dollar as the EU's currency. Problem solved. Forever. No more whining and excuses.
26 Supa7E7 : The USG is in no position to weaken or strengthen the dollar. It is a FLOATING CURRENCY. Sure, they could raise interest rates. That would pie-face th
27 Mariner : Many countries do. I see you have completely ignored the example of New Zealand. Once agan, monetary policy is usually set by the reserve banks, who
28 Ken777 : I believe that Gallois is just very frustrated with the impact the exchange rate has on the company. Just a bit of blowing off steam to vent the frust
29 Jacobin777 : My comment was based on the sheer absurdity that the United States govt. would actively and willingly drop the value of their currency so Boeing coul
30 Post contains links Atmx2000 : The problem is that strategy is going to be incompatible with the goals of his political masters. They aren't going to spend their way out of structu
31 Post contains links Mariner : If "Airbus" said it, that seems amorphous. The thread is about what M. Gallois is reported to have said. But, for the nonce, I have not read anything
32 Jacobin777 : I tend to go with a more "credible" source than urbandictionary.com....such as Oxford or Merriam-Webster Then what is being discussed is incorrect, n
33 Mariner : I'm sorry you think the dictionaries we had when I was a school - which I agree, is a little while ago - are not credible. But I am puzzled - it is n
34 NAV20 : I suspect that Gallois is just building his alibi for what are likely to be pretty 'moderate' results, in terms of profits, for the financial year 200
35 Magyar : Guys, I may have read the wrong article but my understanding of what Mr. Gallois said was "the weakness of the dollar is here to stay (not cyclical) a
36 Planemaker : BTW, M. Beaudoin has made similar comments several times. What comment are you referring to? In all the links no one in the EU or Airbus has said wha
37 Joni : This is a strawman argument, since that wasn't what Gallois said. Pursuing a weak currency is a legitimate option for policymakers, and historically
38 Post contains images Dougloid : Folks, just to clarify the statement that led me to start this thread, here's the excerpt from Reuters. Mr. Gallois clearly refers to a deliberate wea
39 Post contains links PolymerPlane : I know many countries do. But not US government. The Fed is an independent body and does not answer to any political establishment. Since we are talk
40 Kiramakora : Haha. I am sorry, you have no idea what you are taking about. Do not confuse causality with correlation my friend. This I agree.
41 PolymerPlane : The cause of free trade and the cause of budget deficit is not weak dollar policy. One of the result might be weak dollar. But to say that Washington
42 Post contains links Dougloid : Good work....there's a man who took Intro to Logic and actually stayed awake in class. Everyone else: Review the material before your next argument.
43 Post contains images Jacobin777 : Didnt' know urbandictionary was a dictionary used........ Sure the tenor was that of Monsieur Gallois, however I cited the article, which directly st
44 AirFrnt : This discussion is a little bonkers. Does the US government currently have a weak dollar policy (to the little degree they can?) Of course they do. We
45 PanAmOldDC8 : As a person that does not live in the US, I have seen over the years many times that the US dollar has flucuated against the many curencies of the Wor
46 Mariner : As I have pointed out several times, in free countries reserve banks are almost always independent of the elected government. M. Gallois said Washing
47 Post contains images Planemaker : Some of you may wish to check out the latest Economist... Currencies and economies Nov 30th 2006 THE dollar's tumble this week was attended by predict
48 Post contains images Kiramakora : Do not feel special. The French blame everyone for their misery. Germans, developing countries, new EU members, etc. Americans need to stop feeling s
49 Supa7E7 : I can see why you say that, but it is not the whole truth. You are right about Canada; however you should also remember USA's import levels are undes
50 Kiramakora : Good point. I am surprised at how many people have overlooked the general long-term vulnerabilities the U.S. economy has structurally. " target=_blan
51 AirFrnt : Mariner, I usually agree with everything you say, but the inference here, as a red-meat item to cause a splash if nothing else, is that it is the gov
52 Jacobin777 : My mistake, I meant the tenor of the thread and not Monsieur Gallois..regardless..my comments were regarding the article (and the topic of the thread
53 PolymerPlane : Which is FALSE! interest rate is at one of its highest point at recent history. High interest rate is a hint of strong dollar policy, not weak dollar
54 Mariner : What can I say - I disagree. As a shareholder in EADS, I very much want to know the things that M. Gallois said, which seem completely unprovocative
55 Post contains images Lightsaber : The US's trade deficit will eventually *really* weaken the dollar. I predict that in 2007 the dollar is going to further weaken. Other people will no
56 Post contains links Mariner : I don't ignore the point at all - it is central to my position. Let me try again. It is incumbent on a good CEO (and CFO) to address issues which neg
57 PolymerPlane : Never have I said that dollar is not weak. I know the fact is that dollar is weak against the Euro, down from about $.80s/Euro to $1.30/Euro. I am ju
58 Mariner : If you believe that, I can only shrug. mariner
59 7cubed : It's obvious to me now that France is the leading exporter of whine.
60 PolymerPlane : Yeah, me and 10 other economics textbooks. Cheers, PP
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What New Routes To Expect From Virgin Atlantic? posted Fri Dec 15 2006 19:31:49 by 8herveg