Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Reqts. To Fly To Canada From USA VFR  
User currently offlineKingairman From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 291 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 8212 times:

Are their any requirements to fly to Canada from the USA VFR ? Any special permits or flight plans needed ?

Thanks

Kingairman

18 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26376 posts, RR: 76
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 8213 times:

Quoting Kingairman (Thread starter):

Are their any requirements to fly to Canada from the USA VFR ? Any special permits or flight plans needed ?

The biggest requirement is that you have to land at an international airport with customs on duty.



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineKingAirMan From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 8157 times:

i knew that, anyothers ?

User currently offlineGraphic From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 8151 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 1):

The biggest requirement is that you have to land at an international airport with customs on duty.

Try stating things other than the obvious?

You might want to check with Flight Service when you file your flight plan to see if you need to file it as a DVFR and give them a time when you expect to cross the border, and make sure you have your radio operating certificate with you in the airplane.


User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 18
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 8151 times:

Same as anyone else crossing the border...
And I guess your aircraft must perform and be maintained to FAA standards or you'll not be allowed to leave before correcting the shortcomings and may be fined or charged with a federal offense.



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineJayce From Canada, joined Nov 1999, 520 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 8144 times:

If I remember correctly, you do need to file a flight plan to cross the border. You should also call ahead of time with your ETA so the customs guys can be ready.

Also, remember that in Canada, you need to file a flight plan/flight itinerary unless you're travelling within 25nm from your departure airport.



"Trying is the first step towards failure" -Homer Simpson
User currently offlinePilottim747 From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 1607 posts, RR: 5
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 8136 times:

You may want to check out this link:

IPA - Fly to Canada!

It's from the International Pilots Association from the University of North Dakota.



Aviation Photographers & Enthusiasts--Coordinate your life.
User currently offlineBahadir From United States of America, joined Oct 2001, 1772 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 8079 times:

You should start by calling flight service and CANPASS. Go to AOPA's website and read the document about flying in and out of Canada. A.net is the last place i'd consult given the number of 'experts'..

Also , learn to the difference between 'their' , 'there' and 'they're'. Ticks me off when i see pilots making this mistake. It's not a spelling error, it shows lack of education.



Earthbound misfit I
User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 8050 times:

Quoting Kingairman (Thread starter):
Are their any requirements to fly to Canada from the USA VFR ? Any special permits or flight plans needed ?

I live near the US-Canada border and this comes up all the time. I haven't crossed the border in a while so take this with a grain of salt but this may suggest some stuff to research further on your own. Talk with the authorities (in both countries) if you have ANY questions!! They're easy to chat with and are far more pleasant if you find them long before a bad situation comes up.

A tip: be sure to utilize the restroom prior to starting your trip and try not to take in a lot of diuretics (coffee, caffeine, etc)... because you *can't* even get out of the airplane post-landing until the Customs/Immigrations officer allows you to do so.

You don't want to know how upset they can get if this is disregarded. If travelling alone, I'd say to bring a portable bottle 'just in case' the wait is long and not worry about it further. Can get a little more embarrassing with passengers onboard, but it beats some of the bad experiences friends has had with U.S. Customs.

Obviously, don't forget to bring along your (and any paxs') passports or other appropriate legal documents for entry into both countries. Can be easy to forget that sometimes in the excitement of packing up and going to the airport.

You also can't have a DUI/DWI/maybe DWAI conviction on your record nor drug offenses or you won't be allowed in the country. If you have passengers... also check this for them, too!

Obviously, make sure ALL paperwork are in order since you don't want to come across an inspector having a bad day.  Smile You do NOT want to risk having your aircraft confiscated! (On either side of the border.)

Canadian flying rules and setup also slightly differs here-and-there, and is somewhat more European in flavour. For instance, airspace classification or contacting (e.g.) 'Toronto Terminal'. Certain best practices in the U.S. are either prohibited or strongly frowned upon in Canadian aviation.

So... definitely be aware of the Canadian aviation flight rules, best practices, have current charts and whatnot.

Also, in Canada, all VFR flights >25 nm from departure airport and all transborder flights requires a filed flight plan -- the intent is to facilitate search & rescue efforts; particularly important in large and less populated areas of the country. Unlike the U.S., where a filed flight plan for VFR flight is not required, primarily due to population density and services availability.

Read up on Canadian best practices for pattern entry and departure. And airspace classification rules (some differences there), weather minimums, etc.

Do you know where to go to obtain a legal weather briefing prior to departing any airport in Canada?

If you encounter any significant delays (past, say, 15 minutes) in arrival to Canada or the U.S., you most likely need to immediately call and update Customs people using whatever means available.

This may or may not be a requirement on the Canadian side, but the U.S. can be rather an@l-retentive about this. Details varies, depending on how you cross and if you use CANPASS, ADCUS, or some other program or as an ordinary transborder crossing without any special expedited flight programs.

A suggestion would be to make a checklist of required documents, required actions to perform, frequencies and phone numbers (both sides of the border), so that when the time comes, you just run through the list, check off everything as you go along instead of sweating over if you forgot something or not.

Keep in mind that Nav Canada is a private firm that collects payment for services rendered (as part of users fee collection initiative). The registered owner of the aircraft you fly will probably get a bill in the mail later for services rendered. For more information:

http://www.navcanada.ca/ContentDefin...ocharges/Customer_Guide_New_en.pdf

They note the aircraft's registration number and then later sends an invoice in the mail to the address on file with the civil aviation authority of the country of registration (e.g. the FAA's records for U.S.-registered aircraft). No big deal.

Also, keep in mind that in official documentation in Canada, airports will often be referred to as aerodromes.

Nav Canada also has a fee calculation website link here:

http://www.navcanada.ca/NavCanada.as...gesAndAdmin/calculator/Default.xml

If you're an AOPA member (and I strongly recommend it!), they've got a great website on flying to Canada and then back to the U.S.:

http://www.aopa.org/members/pic/intl/canada/

AOPA and COPA also has a prepared joint U.S.-Canada flying guide on how to prepare for a trip to Canada and back to the U.S. (or other way around):

http://www.aopa.org/members/files/travel/canada/

It's a great guide, especially for the first-timer.

Another thing you need to do is make sure your aircraft insurance also includes coverage in Canada, too! Many people forget to check this subtle detail. And if you drive a rental car in Canada as a non-citizen, you'll also need a little card titled:

Non-Resident Inter-Provincial Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance Card

Or you may be subject to arrest and jail if you end up in an accident without legal proof of insurance coverage in Canada. You can get this card for free from your U.S.-based automobile insurance company upon request.

Main government agencies you'd probably deal with on the Canadian side: Nav Canada and Revenue Canada (whom handles customs/immigration via CANPASS as a convenience for the registered CANPASS traveller on behalf of Citizenship and Immigration Canada)... and maybe Canada Border Services Agency.

You'll need a working Mode A and Mode C transponder (or a waiver granted in writing) for transborder operation involving the U.S. side.

Be sure you are current on your intercept procedures and how to respond in case something goes wrong (e.g. not communicated 'in the system') when crossing the border back into the U.S. A big one is to get ATC clearance to enter U.S. airspace BEFORE you actually arrive in it or you're going to be intercepted.

If you do not own the aircraft you're flying, you'll need a notarized letter with details of the aircraft information and an explicit authorization for you (by your full name) to fly the aircraft into Canada and back for a given date range. They want to prevent stolen aircraft as well as revenue lost from improperly registered and purchased aircraft so this is why.

There's quite a few requirements and quirks so read up on them all! Take notes as you go along.

It's a fair bit of planning and reading, but the actual flight itself should be a non-event if well prepared. Enjoy your flight.


User currently offlineKingAirMan From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 8032 times:

WOW thanks for the info! VREf5, Welcome to my RU! u went above and beyond!

User currently offlineJmy007 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 598 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 8013 times:

Quoting Vref5 (Reply 8):
And if you drive a rental car in Canada as a non-citizen, you'll also need a little card titled:

Non-Resident Inter-Provincial Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance Card

I do not believe this is correct. IIRC you would need this card if you are bringing your own vehicle into Canada. I had rented a car in Calagry 2 years ago from Hertz, and I was only required to bring my drivers licence, though I did take (hertz) insurance.

I would be happy to be stood corrected though  Smile



Cookies are the Gateway pastry. They lead to Éclairs and Bear Claws.
User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7988 times:

Quoting Jmy007 (Reply 10):
I do not believe this is correct. IIRC you would need this card if you are bringing your own vehicle into Canada. I had rented a car in Calagry 2 years ago from Hertz, and I was only required to bring my drivers licence, though I did take (hertz) insurance.

Hmm.  Smile Can't quite explain why exactly Hertz didn't ask for it, but:

http://www.expedia.com/daily/vacatio...Tips/SmartTravelTips.asp?CCheck=1&
http://www.tourismvictoria.com/Content/EN/522.asp
http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca...ravel-Canada-Traffic-Rules-en.aspx
http://www.necromantic.net/deadparrot/border01.html

...and seen same wording for various other province-specific websites.

If they've either changed it in certain provinces but not others... or dropped that requirement entirely within the last few years, I may have missed it since I don't keep up to date that well with Canadian laws unless I'm planning a trip over. So I could certainly be wrong on that, and would welcome definitive corrections if so.


User currently offlineSuseJ772 From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 814 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7977 times:

Quoting KingAirMan (Reply 2):
Try stating things other than the obvious?

Holy cow, ya'll are jerks! N1120A, I didn't know that point, so I am glad you didn't skip over the obvious for my own learning. Man people, remember this is a site to learn - there's no such thing as a stupid question, and there is no detail to small to share.



Currently at PIE, requesting FWA >> >>
User currently offlineJmy007 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 598 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 7940 times:

Quoting Vref5 (Reply 11):
...and seen same wording for various other province-specific websites.

If they've either changed it in certain provinces but not others... or dropped that requirement entirely within the last few years, I may have missed it since I don't keep up to date that well with Canadian laws unless I'm planning a trip over. So I could certainly be wrong on that, and would welcome definitive corrections if so.

Thanks for the info!
I had a look at the sights given, nothing is specific to rental cars.
I work in the ski travel industry, and sell loads of rental cars in Calgary and Vancouver, and there is not stipulation about the Non-Resident Inter-Provincial Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance Card with our contracts, nor have I ever had a specific problem with insurance (and I have been doing this for 5 years now) Again, from reading the sites, it is for car owners who bring their own car over the border, and not car rentals.




"It is recommended that US motorists obtain a Canadian non-resident interprovincial motor vehicle liability insurance card from their insurer before travelling to Canada. This indicates that you are covered with the minimum legal insurance requirements throughout Canada."

Recommended  Smile

"Drivers must carry owner registration and proof of insurance coverage, which is compulsory in Canada. The Canadian Non-Resident Inter-Provincial Motor Vehicle Liability Insurance Card, available from any U.S. insurance company, is accepted as evidence of financial responsibility in Canada. The minimum liability coverage in Canada is $200,000, except in Québec, where the minimum is $50,000. If you are driving a car that is not registered in your name, carry a letter from the owner that authorizes your use of the vehicle. "

I am taking that to mean owners of vehicles, and not rental vehicles.


"Insurance is mandatory. Minimum liability is $200,000 [!!!], except in Quebec, where it is $50,000. You can obtain a Canadian Non-Resident Inter-Provincial Motor Vehicle Insurance Liability Card free from your insurance company. "

Again, this is to mean that it is for your vehicle.



Cookies are the Gateway pastry. They lead to Éclairs and Bear Claws.
User currently offlineYYCowboy From Canada, joined Aug 2006, 147 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 7896 times:

One other thing you forgot to mention. Leave you gun at home.


Its hard to soar like an eagle when you're flying with turkeys
User currently offlineKingAirMan From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 291 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 7859 times:

Quoting SuseJ772 (Reply 12):
Quoting KingAirMan (Reply 2):Try stating things other than the obvious?



Quoting SuseJ772 (Reply 12):
Holy cow, ya'll are jerks! N1120A, I didn't know that point, so I am glad you didn't skip over the obvious for my own learning. Man people, remember this is a site to learn - there's no such thing as a stupid question, and there is no detail to small to share.

Excuse me, I never said that, get your facts straight, that should be something for you to learn in this forum


User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2129 posts, RR: 9
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 7843 times:

Quoting N1120A (Reply 1):
The biggest requirement is that you have to land at an international airport with customs on duty.

Not on duty, exactly. Although you do have to land at an airport with customs facilities, the CCRA staff may or may not be available. Many times I have cleared customs after flying VFR from the US by landing and reporting by telephone. Each time I was cleared onwards by the voice on the phone and told to enjoy the rest of my flight.

Quoting Jwenting (Reply 4):
And I guess your aircraft must perform and be maintained to FAA standards or you'll not be allowed to leave before correcting the shortcomings and may be fined or charged with a federal offense.

Not in Canada. CCRA staff are not Transport Canada personnel and will not inspect your aircraft for airworthiness. Nor likely do they care. But why would a crossborder flight be any more illegal or foolish than flying ANYWHERE in a substandard aircraft?

Quoting Vref5 (Reply 8):
because you *can't* even get out of the airplane post-landing until the Customs/Immigrations officer allows you to do so.



Quoting Vref5 (Reply 8):
Can get a little more embarrassing with passengers onboard, but it beats some of the bad experiences friends has had with U.S. Customs.

Ah, but he's talking about flying TO Canada FROM the US. Here, you are perfectly entitled to get out of your airplane. In fact, you have to in order to phone Customs staff at many locations.

Quoting Vref5 (Reply 8):
Keep in mind that Nav Canada is a private firm that collects payment for services rendered (as part of users fee collection initiative). The registered owner of the aircraft you fly will probably get a bill in the mail later for services rendered.

Check the Nav Canada links that were provided, but if flying in a typical light 2 or 4 seater aircraft, there will be no enroute nor landing charges, except for a few select small airports.

Quoting Vref5 (Reply 8):
And if you drive a rental car in Canada as a non-citizen, you'll also need a little card titled:

Never heard of it. All you need is a credit card and a drivers license.

Quoting Vref5 (Reply 8):
A big one is to get ATC clearance to enter U.S. airspace BEFORE you actually arrive in it or you're going to be intercepted.

Nope. If flying VFR, you certainly do not require ATC clearance if crossing the border in either direction in uncontrolled airspace. I would very strongly suggest that you call Customs before you leave so they are expecting you however.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineYVRtoYYZ From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 658 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 7779 times:

Quoting Jmy007 (Reply 10):
I had rented a car in Calagry 2 years ago from Hertz, and I was only required to bring my drivers licence



Quoting Vref5 (Reply 11):
Can't quite explain why exactly Hertz didn't ask for it

I work for Hertz at an FBO in Canada and as we encounter many Americans entering Canada through our FBO, I can assure you that all you require is a valid driver's license, Hertz/credit card insurance and a means to pay for the rental.

-YVRtoYYZ


User currently offlineVref5 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 7736 times:

Gentlemen (and ladies if any are lurking here) -- thank you very much for setting me straight.  Smile

Canada's a wonderful place, and I know the original poster is going to enjoy his trip.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
DL: 10 Flights To Italy Next Summer From USA posted Thu Oct 12 2006 15:29:21 by Nycfly75
Swiss To Get A340 From Air Canada posted Sun Sep 17 2006 16:15:29 by Swissairtaz
European City With The Most Flights To/from USA posted Thu Sep 14 2006 14:21:53 by Emrecan
SAS To Get A340 From Canada? posted Sun Aug 13 2006 00:36:02 by OyKIE
Whale Transport From USA To Europe posted Thu Feb 9 2006 18:47:12 by Rom1
Flights From USA To Israel posted Sun Sep 4 2005 14:35:40 by SNBru
757-300 To Europe From USA posted Sat Jul 16 2005 13:25:00 by C172
Low Cost Travel To Canada From The UK... posted Tue Jun 21 2005 23:12:16 by Gilesdavies
Flights From USA To Libya posted Thu Feb 26 2004 18:30:57 by Jeffrey1970
Flights From USA To Havana, Cuba posted Tue Jan 13 2004 21:39:14 by Stpeterc