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PILOTS-----Postsecondary?  
User currently offlineDolcevita747 From Canada, joined Jun 2006, 15 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1929 times:

Im a 21 yr old student pilot and am also in my third year of university studying business. Ive just started my night rating and was wondering what types of postsecondary education do most professional pilots have. On the average, what degree/diploma are major carriers looking for? Whats your degree/diploma in?
Regards,
-dv747

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1898 times:

Quoting Dolcevita747 (Thread starter):
Ive just started my night rating

Night rating? They have that in Canada??

Quoting Dolcevita747 (Thread starter):
On the average, what degree/diploma are major carriers looking for? Whats your degree/diploma in?

It doesn't matter what your degree is in, as long as you have one. To answer your question I am getting a bachelors of aviation science something or other blah blah. Some long worded degree that I have no idea what it means or what I can do with it.  Smile Fun college I have. Thats why I just say I fly planes.


User currently offlineN160LH From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 280 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1897 times:

I am going to try and avoid a starting an Airbus vs. Boeing topic here...

Personally I just graduated from Embry-Riddle... will that help me find a job flying for a airline... Maybe... But it will not guarantee anything... It might open a door or two but it will not give me a golden brick road to a job... Airlines from my experience are looking for flight hours and a degree... and it seems right now that a 1000 hours of total time accompanied with a 100 hours of multi time plus a degree is the ticket to an interview with the Regionals...

Some of the DL pilots that I used to work with used to joke around and say that a degree in basket weaving is all that is required to fly an airplane... Its the flight time (and/or experience) that counts... But most of them also had military experience too...

So the best advice I can give (for the second time tonight... just said this same thing in another thread...) is... Get a degree in whatever... and start FLYING..!

-160



"I do alright up in the air, its down on the ground that I tend to mess up..."
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 1888 times:

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 1):
Night rating? They have that in Canada??

Yes they do up in Canada we do not auto-matically get our night rating with our PPL, what do you need like 2 or 3 hours of night flying for it. Up in Canada we need 10 instrument as well as 10 Night hours, with 5 (correct me if i am wrong) X country, and 2.5 of those PIC.

Quoting Dolcevita747 (Thread starter):
m a 21 yr old student pilot and am also in my third year of university studying business. Ive just started my night rating and was wondering what types of postsecondary education do most professional pilots have. On the average, what degree/diploma are major carriers looking for? Whats your degree/diploma in?

The US and Canada are very very different in this matter. Down in the states, you really can not go anywhere without a degree in something. Up in Canada, although it helps it is not required. What is required up here, is experience and very good experience at that. Getting time with companies such as Costal Pacific and Kenn Borek Air are excellent for the log book. I am currently doing a Commerical Aviation Deploma program, not required but i figured it has a structered sylabus and can keep me better on track, and it may give me that extra little something to get me in with an airline. My goal is AC, because of this i have taken a look over the website and have come across this.

http://www.aircanada.com/en/about/career/pilots.html

Flight Operations – Pilot

Whether a Captain, a First Officer or Relief Pilot, an Air Canada pilot's number one priority is to conduct each flight safely with due consideration to passenger comfort and on-time performance.

While the typical work month consists of approximately 80 hours of flying, pilots spend many additional hours on such ground duties as preparing flight plans, readying the aircraft for departure, and completing post-flight reports. A day's work may vary from a long-range international flight to a sequence of shorter domestic flights. Reserve duty, in which the pilot is "on call", may also be assigned.

Air Canada pilots operate out of one of the four crew bases: Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg or Vancouver. Base preferences are awarded in seniority so pilots must be willing to relocate as assigned. Pilots typically begin their career as a First Officer on domestic aircraft or as a Relief Pilot on long-range, international flights.

Job Requirements

To fly for Air Canada, pilots must meet certain basic requirements:

*
1000 hours of fixed wing flying time
*
Completion of schooling to the university entrance level. Ability to pass the Air Canada and Transport Canada medical and visual acuity requirements for a Category 1 medical certificate.
*
Canadian Commercial Pilot licence, current Instrument Rating and Multi-Engine endorsement.
*
Canadian citizenship or landed immigrant status.

Pilot applications far exceed job vacancies, so preference is given to candidates with qualifications beyond the basic requirements. Examples of desirable additional qualifications include, but are not limited to:

*
Canadian Airline Transport Pilot licence
*
University degree or college diploma
*
Aviation College diploma
*
Military or commercial flight experience
*
Jet and/or glass cockpit experience
*
Additional language(s)

Air Canada is currently interviewing candidates who meet these requirements. If you are interested in a career as an Air Canada pilot, please submit and maintain your profile using the link at the end of this document.

In my opinion AC would be an excellent airline to get on with in Canada. I personally would not want to be "stuck" on the 737 all my life, and would like to have advancment possibilities. Best of luck to you, hope to see you in the cockpit one day!



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineZBBYLW From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 1984 posts, RR: 6
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1878 times:

Sorry I forgot to mention but an EXCELLENT way to get into flying is getting you Instructor rating, and then instruct until you find another job, flying twins of some kind to get your multi time up, and then after that hopefully AC or WS may come calling. Personally I am going to get my Instructor rating this summer, finish up my diploma then start working as an instructor. Eventually I will want to get on with Kenn Borek flying the twin otters, maybe even the DC-3 if I am lucky. After spending some considerable "fun" time with them i would plan to settle down with AC. Of course aviation is never a sure bet and I will go anywhere that I can to get a job, but this is my "preferred" way to get into my dream job.

Cheers Chris



Keep the shinny side up!
User currently offlineKearney From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 140 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1870 times:

Its not what you know, its who you know. I really dont think having a degree is what will get you with the airlines today. I think if you are a woman, have a disability, or are a minority of something rather, you have the best shot! There is no way to tell what will land you the job. I know a senior pilot with georgian trying to get into AC (hes still a young guy) and for some reason he cant get in, even though pilots with less hours that are below him find there way through.

Quoting Dolcevita747 (Thread starter):
On the average, what degree/diploma are major carriers looking for?

They don't care. (i dont think)
Honestly, what field of study will actualy land you a job after uni? Do employers even care? I guess having a degree will help, but who cares what it is. Look at the airforce, take basket weaving in uni and then become a fighter pilot!


User currently offlineN160LH From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 280 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 1846 times:

Quoting Kearney (Reply 5):
have a disability

I am pretty sure that its safe to say that, having a disability will not help you get a job as a pilot with an airline, and it will surely not help you get a first class medical...

-160



"I do alright up in the air, its down on the ground that I tend to mess up..."
User currently offlineAirWillie6475 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 2448 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 6 days ago) and read 1837 times:

Having a degree can get you a chance at better places in aviation. Although I think that a degree doesn't have major impact on you getting the job, after all they are looking for someone who's not a dick in the cockpit more importantly than his education level. This is definitely a who you know industry. If a Captain especially one with some good seniority vouches for you, it doesn't matter, you're in. Here in the states you need at least a 2 year degree to get a job at a major airline, there is no way of getting a job with out some kind of degree. Regional airlines do not care, they would probably hire monkeys if they have the minimums, they're even lowering minimums to 500 hours, some even hire with lower hours than that if you konw somebody NO JOke!

User currently offlineFuturecaptain From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 8 months 1 week 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1734 times:

Quoting ZBBYLW (Reply 3):
Yes they do up in Canada we do not auto-matically get our night rating with our PPL, what do you need like 2 or 3 hours of night flying for it.

Wow, I never knew you needed a night rating. Here we do 10 landings at night and fly 1 night cross country to get a PPL.


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