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Overbooking Criteria?  
User currently offlineVingt20cent From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 88 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1720 times:

Happy New Year!

Let's say a flight is overbooked and there are NO volunteers. How does the airline determine who will be "bumped" off the plane?

Thanks in advance!

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAA737-823 From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 5766 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1691 times:

Ticketing order and also check-in order may be used, according to Continental's policies that I recently read on their website.
No, it was in their in-flight magazine.
Okay, here we go. From the December 2006 issue of CONTINENTAL:
"Is there anything I can do to avoid getting bumped?"
"...If the flight becomes overbooked, customers with seat assignments will get priority over those who don't have one. And it's always good to check in early. The order in which you check in does matter, especially when you're waiting for a seat assignment.

So yeah- chose a seat at the time of ticketing, and check in at Continental.com (or your airline's website) 24 hours before departure. If you're sequence #1, there's pretty much no risk of being bumped.


User currently offlineJetdeltamsy From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2987 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1683 times:

American has recently switched from last to check-in to last booked (and purchased).

The last booked policy makes no sense to me as these seats usually command higher fares. I think AA exempts full-Y from being bumped under the new systems, as it does international connecting customers, top-tier frequent flyers, Admirals Club members, the disabled, active military, children under 18 and anyone the agent feels being denied would place an undue hardship upon (funerals, medical treatment, old age, etc...)

To me, denying a customer a seat is about the worst customer service failure you can put out there...worse than weather, mechanical and ATC. Imagine, taking $1000 from somebody yesterday and tellling them, "whoop! Sorry! we overshot our bookings and we can't take you.". That's how you get rid of high fare passengers very quickly.



Tired of airline bankruptcies....EA/PA/TW and finally DL.
User currently offlineMCOflyer From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 8670 posts, RR: 15
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 1679 times:

I thankfully am a US plat member and choose my seats early. I will give up my seat for a ticket as I love to fly.

MCOflyer



Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
User currently offlineBongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3545 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1669 times:

IMO the people most likely to accept an offer to be bumped are those who paid the least for their tickets; I have heard of people being offered a few hundred pounds for a delay of four hours or so. That is a good offer, if you have only paid say £300 for your flight, but not if you hold an open ticket costing three times that amount.
Indeed one person told me that he was part of a party of 10 flying LGW - MCO with VS who accepted a routing LGW - New York and an internal flight down to MCO which resulted in an overall delay of 5 hours or so, and the compensation was a free round trip ticket anywhere on VS. Which nicely took care of the next years holiday.
This seemed like a good result to both parties, as he was certainly happy, and the VS staff managed to bump 10 passengers in one transaction.


User currently offlineCkfred From United States of America, joined Apr 2001, 5211 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1657 times:

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 2):
To me, denying a customer a seat is about the worst customer service failure you can put out there...worse than weather, mechanical and ATC. Imagine, taking $1000 from somebody yesterday and tellling them, "whoop! Sorry! we overshot our bookings and we can't take you.". That's how you get rid of high fare passengers very quickly.

I've been on a number of AA flights in which volunteers were needed, and AA never seemed to have a problem in getting enough volunteers. I'm often one of them.

On the other hand, in watching the show "Airline" it seems that Southwest has a devil of a time getting volunteers, which is why Southwest has the highest rate of involuntary bumping.

The thing is that car rental companies and hotels also overbook. I've had friends who have either been ungraded in car class or upgraded to a suite, because of a miscalculation in overbookings.


User currently offlineFlyDreamliner From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2759 posts, RR: 15
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 1619 times:

yep!

i've had that one happen... no complaints there.

when Y overbooks, people are upgraded to J/C all the time when there are still seats open.

it's an easy enough way to solve such problems.



"Let the world change you, and you can change the world"
User currently offlineJetdeltamsy From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2987 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 1591 times:

Quoting FlyDreamliner (Reply 6):
when Y overbooks, people are upgraded to J/C all the time when there are still seats open.

You are mistaken there. Airlines will generally only upgrade someone who either looks like a first class passenger (profiling????) or someone who has experirenced significant service failure.

At Delta, front cabin seats went empty all of the time when economy was overbooked. All the time.



Tired of airline bankruptcies....EA/PA/TW and finally DL.
User currently offlineBongodog1964 From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2006, 3545 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 1526 times:

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 7):
Quoting FlyDreamliner (Reply 6):
when Y overbooks, people are upgraded to J/C all the time when there are still seats open.

You are mistaken there. Airlines will generally only upgrade someone who either looks like a first class passenger (profiling????) or someone who has experirenced significant service failure.

Surely not ?

Firstly I was under the impression that upgrading these days if far more scientific than "looks like a 1st class passenger"; in that unless you are a member of a frequent flier scheme you stand no chance, and even then the most valuable customers get upgraded 1st.
The old method of "looks suitable" was an insult to loyal customers. My in laws were upgraded by this method many years ago, probably because father in law was one of those people who always travelled with his collar buttoned and a tie, on his annual holiday trip. meanwhile economy was probably full of business people with open necked shirts who travelled regularly feeling rather hacked off at the injustice.

Secondly I'm sure that at least here in the UK they upgrade before bumping people from flights; even if they sell the upgrade to clear an economy seat. I know my wife and daughter were offered the chance at check in to purchase an upgrade to club by BA on a MCO - LGW flight last year


User currently offlineAerorobnz From Rwanda, joined Feb 2001, 7184 posts, RR: 13
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 1326 times:

We upgrade Y to U, U to C first, then if we still have an oversell we just leave behind the last to check in at the airport. That way we only offload those who can't be bothered turning up on time. That's the fairest way. Gold passengers are obviously going to be put up a class first, so even if they are late they get a seat in most instances.

It's first in to check in, first serve. Again that's the fairest way.
Say we have oversold 10 seats, and someone has requested 18HJK but they are checking in when we have less than a certain number of seats to offer then we will cancel seat requests so we can use the seats. It's all in the rules and regulations of the tickets so there is no arguement.

I offloaded a family of 4 the other day at check in because I ran out of seats while checking in some other passengers, so as the family hadn't checked in yet I used their seats and they didn't travel. If seat requests are important enough to request then come early to guarantee a seat, simple as that.


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