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Chinese Airline Serious Engine Problem  
User currently offlineLHRneighbour From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2005, 36 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 6894 times:

I came across the following this evening and then I did a QUICK search on A.net but nothing came up.
Is this story for real? Or just something made-up by competing carriers?!

http://www.boreme.com/boreme/funny-2007/china-air-p1.php


James
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25435 posts, RR: 49
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 6865 times:

Several years old - Air China.


From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineScorpio From Belgium, joined Oct 2001, 5032 posts, RR: 44
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 6 days ago) and read 6800 times:

Quoting LHRneighbour (Thread starter):
Is this story for real?

More than likely not. Except for this story floating around on the net, there's no report on this. If this were real, Air China would've been banned from flying to the EU.


User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6913 posts, RR: 46
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6691 times:

The picture doesn't look fake; it must have been taken somewhere.


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineEFHK From Finland, joined Nov 2006, 392 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6676 times:

Though it looks quite real, I wouldn't trust a website called "boreme.com".


One of the best places in the world: McDonald's in T2 at FRA.
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8964 posts, RR: 40
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 6646 times:

I have problems with the idea that those seat-belt straps would have remained in place for the entire flight. . .


"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineAS739X From United States of America, joined Apr 2003, 6150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6571 times:

Agreed PPVRA. My guess is somewhere and engine was removed due to ingesting something, hence the damage. The seat belt just happened to be used to secure the blades on a truck ride somewhere, or just so they wouldn't move sitting in the hangar. Then when the pics came out, a story was added. With all the aviation buffs on this site, this story would have been brought up a few times.

ASLAX



"Some pilots avoid storm cells and some play connect the dots!"
User currently offlineScorpio From Belgium, joined Oct 2001, 5032 posts, RR: 44
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 22 hours ago) and read 6571 times:

Quoting SEPilot (Reply 3):
The picture doesn't look fake

The picture isn't fake, but the story probably is. What you're seeing here is probably an engine being prepared for shipment (possibly underwing on a 747 as a 'fifth' engine) to be repaired. The engine was obviously damaged by a foreign object. I don't believe for one single second the Air China took off with the engine like that on only three working engines for a revenue flight.

[Edited 2007-02-06 21:58:48]

User currently offlineKGAI From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 120 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 6387 times:

Those straps are NOT seatbelts

User currently offlineOly720man From United Kingdom, joined May 2004, 6741 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 6178 times:

Quoting LHRneighbour (Thread starter):
Or just something made-up by competing carriers?!

Seems to have first appeared in alt.culture.taiwan newsgroup/forum in early 2003.

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.c...3a77a3cb5c6?hl=en#869493a77a3cb5c6

The first 2 posts seem to be missing.



wheat and dairy can screw up your brain
User currently offlineYellowtail From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 6180 posts, RR: 2
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 5913 times:

Hey, I was jsut about to post it and I discovered this thread...the thread title almost made me miss it.

Flight international is now reporting the story..perhaps it is so after all.

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...ound-blades-leading-to-german.html



When in doubt, hold on to your altitude. No-one has ever collided with the sky.
User currently offlineQantas744ER From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1286 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 5884 times:

This is totally bullshit!

That engine is from a Kailitta 741F that in FRA suffered a engine failure after a vast number of birds had entered the engine on takeoff from rwy. 18!

It is obviouse that the engine has had some kind of FOD... BTW that is a JTD-9 and Air China only fly the 744 to FRA since the past 9 years!  Wink

First aviation Bullshit for 2007 Big grin

Leo



Happiness is V1 in Lagos
User currently offlineLitz From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1765 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 5835 times:
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This has made the rounds for several years ....

According to lore, it was a chinese freighter 747 that was bound for somewhere in europe, and landed in FRA due to fuel emergency.

According to the lore, they'd been flying on 3 engines and therefore had a higher fuel burn than expected.

Text of the common email spreading this around :

Quote:
A pilot for a 747 belonging to a Chinese carrier requested permission and landed at Frankfurt, Germany for an unscheduled refueling stop. The reason became soon apparent to the ground crew: The Number 3 engine had been shut down because of excessive vibration, and because it didn't look to be in a great state of repair.

It had apparently been no problem for the resourceful maintenance team back in China: they took some sturdy straps and wrapped them around several of the fan blades and the structures behind, thus stopping any unwanted windmilling (engine spinning by itself due to airflow passing thru the blades during flight) and associated uncomfortable vibration caused by the suboptimal fan. Note that the straps are seatbelts!

After making the "repairs", off they went into the wild blue yonder with another revenue-making flight on only three engines! With the increased fuel consumption, they got a bit low on fuel, and just set it down at the closest airport for a quick refill.

That's when the problems started: The Germans, who are kind of picky about this stuff, inspected the malfunctioning engine and immediately grounded the aircraft. (besides the seatbelts, notice the appalling condition of the fan blades.) The airline operator had to send a chunk of money to get the first engine replaced (took about 10 days) The repair contractor decided to do some impromptu inspection work on the other engines, none of which looked all that great either.

The result: a total of 3 engines were eventually changed on this plane before it was permitted to fly again.

links :

http://www.airdisaster.com/forums/showthread.php?t=83750

http://chaspope.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!9894DE882DEA4909!295.entry

- litz


User currently offlineMarkC From United States of America, joined Apr 2006, 259 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 5727 times:

Quoting Qantas744ER (Reply 11):
It is obviouse that the engine has had some kind of FOD... BTW that is a JTD-9 and Air China only fly the 744 to FRA since the past 9 years!

Based on the tip rubstrip pattern, and front flange config, I'll confirm a JT9D-7A series. Circa 1970 - 1976. It would only be on 747-100 and 747-200.

I've seen worse.


User currently offlineVasu From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 3916 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 5629 times:

I saw this too... and got quite worried about Chinese Aviation...

A couple of years back I read on here about one Chinese airline seating extra passengers on plastic seats in the aisle!


User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 5569 times:

Quoting Oly720man (Reply 9):
Seems to have first appeared in alt.culture.taiwan newsgroup/forum in early 2003.

I first saw the pictures when I lived in the UK and I returned to the States in February 2002. So it was before 2003. The story as I recall was that the subject aircraft was ferried (on three engines) with the damaged fan secured to prevent rotation, because of the obvious balance problem.


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