Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
What Is The Largest Object To Be Airborn?  
User currently offlineAirfoilsguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14956 times:

What is the largest or heaviest object to be airborne? I don't mean aircraft itself but some thing carried or hoisted by an aircraft.

61 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2162 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14964 times:

Oprah Winfrey circa 1996, spotted flying ORD-LAX.


The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14950 times:

I would guess the Space Shuttle when it's piggy-backing on the 747.


There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineLHStarAlliance From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14933 times:

Or the Hindenburg Zepelin ...

User currently offlineSCAT15F From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 402 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14941 times:

Quoting LHStarAlliance (Reply 3):
Or the Hindenburg Zepelin ...

Most definitely.


User currently offlineN1120A From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 26598 posts, RR: 75
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14922 times:

Largest Wingspan: Spruce Goose (Hughes H-4 Hercules)
Heaviest: An225 Myria



Mangeons les French fries, mais surtout pratiquons avec fierte le French kiss
User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14911 times:

How is it that people manage to not read the entire post when it consists of two sentences and one line? He said clearly in the 2nd (obviously superfluous!) sentence:

Quoting Airfoilsguy (Thread starter):
I don't mean aircraft itself but some thing carried or hoisted by an aircraft.



There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineNoWorries From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 539 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 7 hours ago) and read 14906 times:

In the case of the space shuttle riding piggy-back, does it generate any lift of its own to offset its weight?

What's the maximum load for an AN-225? Has it ever carried a single object at/near it's load limit?


User currently offlineFlyinTLow From Germany, joined Oct 2004, 524 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14831 times:

I think it would most definitely be the Saturn V rocket. Not the flying we are thinking about when we hear airborne. But I would say most definitely bigger than the An225. For sure by weight also bigger than the Hindenburg. Now by volume..... I don't know!

Cheers,

Thilo



- When dreams take flight, follow them -
User currently offlineRichardPrice From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14780 times:

Quoting Lemurs (Reply 2):
I would guess the Space Shuttle when it's piggy-backing on the 747.

The Shuttle weighs about 75 tons, the An-124 routinely carries heavier loads, and indeed holds the world record for heaviest item lifted - a 120 ton (109 tonne) locamotive.

Quoting NoWorries (Reply 7):

What's the maximum load for an AN-225? Has it ever carried a single object at/near it's load limit?

The An-225 can carry about 275 tons maximum internally, but the An-124 holds the record as noted above.

The largest objects carried would be some of the external loads Soviet aircraft carried for its space program - single piece propellant tanks etc


User currently offlineGr8SlvrFlt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1607 posts, RR: 10
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14767 times:

I'd say both the LZ-129 Hindenburg and her sister ship, the LZ-130 Graf Zeppelin II. Both were 804 feet long and 135 feet in diameter. The Graf II was under construction when the Hindenburg was destroyed. She flew thirty missions from September 1938 until August 1939 and was scrapped in April 1940.

User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14696 times:

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 9):
The Shuttle weighs about 75 tons, the An-124 routinely carries heavier loads, and indeed holds the world record for heaviest item lifted - a 120 ton (109 tonne) locamotive.

Yes, but it is much larger than anything the AN's can fit inside of them. He said "largest or heaviest" so I went after the largest. The heaviest was almost certainly going to be a piece of massiving mining equipment on a 124 or 225. (Edit: Sheepisly not reading the entire post. Go me. *sigh*) Also, even at 75tons the shuttle probably doesn't weight that much at speed, since it's generating it's own lift to a certain degree.

Quoting FlyinTLow (Reply 8):
I think it would most definitely be the Saturn V rocket. Not the flying we are thinking about when we hear airborne. But I would say most definitely bigger than the An225.

That's a good one. The upper stages at least have to count. You can't really count the first stage while it is firing because the first stage is the "aircraft" at that point. Still, even given that the first stage was ~75% of the whole weight of the thing, that still means it was pushing ~850 tons straight up in the air as dead weight payload. Impressive.

[Edited 2007-03-13 18:03:10]


There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlineNosedive From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14665 times:

Was the USSR's Space Shuttle, Buran, a bit bigger than ours?

User currently offlineEatmybologna From France, joined Apr 2005, 412 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14667 times:

What about the Saturn multi-stage rocket where the 1st stage is lifting the enormous mass of the latter stages (fuel,) Apollo spacecraft, and crew?


Isn't knowledge more than just the acquisition of information? Shouldn't the acquired information be correct?
User currently offlineGr8SlvrFlt From United States of America, joined Jan 2002, 1607 posts, RR: 10
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 14640 times:

The Saturn V is 363 feet tall and 33 feet in diameter and 6.7 million pounds! Definitely the heaviest but nowhere near the largest: Hindenburg and Graf Zeppelin II.

User currently offlineAlexPorter From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14592 times:

There is also the big tan fuel tank that goes up with the space shuttle. But other spacegoing objects may be larger.

User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21544 posts, RR: 59
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14571 times:

Quoting Lemurs (Reply 11):
since it's generating it's own lift to a certain degree.

Not really. It's only a somewhat okay glider when there is a steap angle of attack. At the "nose down" orientation it takes sitting on the top of a 747, it wouldn't produce much lift at all. And it would be dangerous to have an uncontrolled wing surface like that generating lift. At takeoff it will contribute a little, but not during flight or landing.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6123 posts, RR: 29
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14547 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Quoting Gr8SlvrFlt (Reply 10):
I'd say both the LZ-129 Hindenburg and her sister ship, the LZ-130 Graf Zeppelin II. Both were 804 feet long and 135 feet in diameter

That is huge. I once worked on a 614 foot ship that was 64 feet wide. That was big, but there are ships that are much larger. Around the great lakes many ships are around 800 feet. I couldn't imagine seeing something that big in the air. How cool it must have been to see a Zeppelin in real life.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9525 posts, RR: 31
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14546 times:

I would say, it is the German Minister for the Environment, when he speaks about global warming.  Wow!

But talking about other flying objects. I'd say the combination of the An225 and the Soviet space shuttle took the price.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineTripleDelta From Croatia, joined Jul 2004, 1123 posts, RR: 7
Reply 19, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14510 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
PHOTO SCREENER

Quoting Lemurs (Reply 11):
Yes, but it is much larger than anything the AN's can fit inside of them. He said "largest or heaviest" so I went after the largest. The heaviest was almost certainly going to be a piece of massiving mining equipment on a 124 or 225.

According to this site, the Buran could weigh between 82-87 tons on landing, so I presume that it weighed about 80 tons empty (is that about right, after you offload everything not needed for the ferry flight?). The An-225 was designed to carry it piggy-back much like the NASA 747 does (or do. How many of them are there?).

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Chris Brown
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Petr Volek




No plane, no gain.
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6491 posts, RR: 3
Reply 20, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14489 times:

Quoting Gr8SlvrFlt (Reply 10):
I'd say both the LZ-129 Hindenburg and her sister ship, the LZ-130 Graf Zeppelin II. Both were 804 feet long and 135 feet in diameter.

To give some perspective, the Spanish aircraft carrier Principe de Asturias is only 643 feet long and 80 feet wide.



When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' T.Roosevelt
User currently offlineEI321 From Iraq, joined Jul 2009, 0 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14479 times:

The AN225 delivered a IE 201 Class locomotive into SNN from Canada, circa late 90s for Irish Rail. They weigh 112 tonnes. It can be seen on the AN225 documentary on discovery / nat geo. Its was the record back then, not sure if it has been beaten.

[Edited 2007-03-13 18:51:54]

User currently offlineKSUpilot From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 656 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14479 times:

If you count Earth Orbit, I guess you could say the ISS.

[Edited 2007-03-13 18:49:03]

User currently offlineLemurs From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 1439 posts, RR: 4
Reply 23, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 14432 times:

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 16):
Not really. It's only a somewhat okay glider when there is a steap angle of attack. At the "nose down" orientation it takes sitting on the top of a 747, it wouldn't produce much lift at all. And it would be dangerous to have an uncontrolled wing surface like that generating lift. At takeoff it will contribute a little, but not during flight or landing.

Ahh good point, I forgot about the orientation they put it in for ferrying. So it's just a big old bag'o'drag then, isn't it?

Quoting TripleDelta (Reply 19):
The An-225 was designed to carry it piggy-back much like the NASA 747 does (or do. How many of them are there?).

The Buran is about a meter shorter in length, a meter shorter in height, and has a few extra centimeters of wingspan, so they're virtually identical in terms of shape/volume...as you might expect based on looks. I'd call them essentially identical loads.



There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary, and those that don't.
User currently offlinePhilb From Ireland, joined May 1999, 2915 posts, RR: 13
Reply 24, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 14376 times:

The AN-225 currently holds all the records for lifting weight to altitude see: http://records.fai.org/general_aviation/current.asp?id1=21&id2=4

There is a claim that a 747-400F, the base type used by the US in development of laser weapons technology, holds the record for the greatest mass carried into the air - though the date listed is definitely incorrect if it implies the YAL-1 variant is the aircraft concerned and it pre-dates the first 747-400F which was not rolled out until March 1993, not to mention I can find no other claim for this record in official listings or other publications! www.military.com/soldiertech/0,14632,Soldiertech_ABL,,00.html - 52k -

As to the biggest (as opposed to heaviest) object lifted, the Shuttle plus fuel tank must be first, followed by some of the single piece items lifted inside tha AN-225 such as drilling equipment but closely followed by some of the fuselage sections that the Airbus operated Guppies, Belugas; the Boeing chartered AN-124s and the B747LCF lift.

Biggest and heaviest would once again be drilling equipment pieces closely followed by the railway engine #201 for Irish Rail lifted from Canada to Ireland by AN-124 and grossing 112 tonnes, with a length of 20.9 metres a height of 4.02 metres and a width of 2.75 metres


25 A342 : According to Antonov, the record is "Siemens generator of 135.2 t weight from Dusseldorf (Germany) to Delhi (India) (this operation has been recorded
26 Post contains links and images TripleDelta : In volume maybe more, since the Buran had no main engines like the Shuttle. Interesting though that despite its slightly smaller size and lack of bul
27 Litz : In what possible way could it have been so urgent that they had to ship this by air? The cost must have been ... scary AFAIK, pretty much every locom
28 Philb : The loco was the first of a class of new loco which was ordered both by the Republic and Northern Ireland, mainly for the Belfast - Dublin service. A
29 Airfoilsguy : Any photos of the loco inside or near the AN 225?
30 Philb : No, because EI321 has it wrong, it was an AN124, the AN-225 was not airworthy at the time. There were photos at the time but I can't point you to any
32 RedChili : If you're going to count this way, then I believe that the Russian N1 lunar booster would take the first prize. The first stage lifts 5,130,000 kg as
33 SCAT15F : Absolute all time payload record set by the Antonov An-225 on Sept 11 (yes) 2001: 4 main battle tanks for a total payload of 558,404 lbs over a dista
34 Post contains images SJC4Me :
35 Post contains images TheRonald : BRAVO SIR, BRAVO You obviously have a keen eye for detail...so many remind me of 'shoot first, ask later' ...sad
36 Post contains images USADreamliner : William Shatner on the Enterprise !
37 BoeingFever777 : I would say maybe the ISS "International Space Station. ISS Statistics Crew: 3 As of March 07, 2007 Perigee: 319.6 km (172.6 NM) Apogee: 346.9 km (187
38 OldAeroGuy : Well, the USS Saratoga (CV-3) was blown aloft by an underwater A-Bomb test. Her dimensions were: 880 ft length 36,000 tons standard displacement 53,00
39 Post contains links Scramjetter : According to the official record keepers at the Federation Aeronautique Internationale, FAI: http://records.fai.org/general_aviation/current.asp?id1=2
40 Philb : On a point of fact the ISS is definitely not airborne as it is outside the earth's atmosphere. As it was transported to its position in bits and asse
41 EI321 : Your right. I presumed it was the AN225, as there was a video of it on an AN225 documentary.
42 BOSGRU : AHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHA..gotta love the OPRAH comment...that was brilliant.....amazing how so many people misread the post...simply amazing.
43 Tockeyhockey : the space shuttle is a "lifting body" craft. the wings provide very little lift -- just a tiny bit of control surface. the entire body is what provide
44 MD80fanatic : Hindenburg was definitely the largest "known" craft (perhaps NASA has a black project or two that could be bigger). Also......piggybacked shuttles (bo
45 DH106 : I don't doubt some lift is generated by the fus. at an angle of attack - as in all aircraft, but to my eye the shuttle really doesn't have the shape
46 F14D4ever : Under what definition of 'flying wing' are you laboring?
47 Sinlock : First, you leave out the point that all 4 N1 Rockets failed during launch. Second, The first stage lifts 5,130,000 kg as opposed to the 7,648,000 lbs
48 Philb : Now, for all those talking about rockets, this thread is really the wrong place. Airborne means "borne or supported by the air". Most bodies that trav
49 Coa747 : The Space Shuttle flies like a rock. Descent rate of over 10,000 feet a minute at a 30 degree angle. Interestingly enough they didn't find this out ri
50 SkyexRamper : George Bush's ego on the current war.
51 Bbobbo : That's four objects. I think the OP was looking for largest or heaviest single object.
52 MD80fanatic : If the shuttle was designed to be a better glider, it would probably fail to achieve orbit in one piece. There was a tradeoff between gliding and havi
53 Post contains links Tockeyhockey : there is some information on the web about the lifting body program. here's a brief excerpt: http://dtrs.dfrc.nasa.gov/archive/00000234/ i take flyin
54 Areopagus : No shock, no surprise. They knew the drag would be much greater with the cone off, and they had simulated it in the NASA Gulfstream with its addition
55 RedChili : True. But I would still say that there's a difference, as the engines on a 747 are fixed to the airplane and not intended to be separated from it, wh
56 Thorny : Weird. Buran must have been built like a battleship. Each Space Shuttle Main Engine weighs 6,000 lbs, so Buran was at least 18,000 lbs. lighter for t
57 Post contains images Electech6299 : Maybe contenders for biggest, but by weight? Both were lighter than air Now that's classic. For both size and weight, I vote for the Saratoga! Defini
58 Tockeyhockey : i accept that as a good correction to my statement. however, i would still argue that the space shuttle is generating some lift while attached to the
59 Post contains links and images MD-90 : This was pretty big:
60 SkyexRamper : How about the Saturn V rocket for the largest thing airborne.
61 Philb : Did you not read the thread? Anyway, rockets are not airborne as they cannot sustain any controlled flight if thrust is withdrawn. They do not glide,
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
What Is The Usual Approach To Honolulu Intl.? posted Sun Feb 5 2006 14:14:39 by Jetskial
Is The A330 Going To Be Discontinued? posted Sun Oct 23 2005 14:31:20 by Gilesdavies
WLG - What Is The Largest A/c It Can Handle posted Tue Jun 15 2004 15:43:35 by VirginFlyer
What Is The Largest O & D Market? posted Sun May 9 2004 21:09:34 by Nycfuturepilot
What Is The Largest A/c Into ORK? posted Fri Sep 5 2003 17:43:21 by Rw774477
What Is The Largest Aircraft Serving Des Moines? posted Fri Aug 1 2003 06:48:30 by IloveBOI
What Is The Best Destination To Survey BA posted Sat Nov 16 2002 16:44:42 by Skippy777
What Is The Best Airline To Fly Ord To London? posted Wed Oct 30 2002 05:52:00 by Boeing 747-311
What Is The Best Day To...? posted Sun Jan 6 2002 23:12:01 by VC-25A
What Is The Largest Plane That Can Fly Out Of Cos? posted Sun Nov 25 2001 07:37:45 by DeltaBoy777