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What Happens During Take Off?  
User currently offlineChrisjdurber From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2004, 126 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18356 times:

Okay! please dont shoot me down here!! have got the godkids here and am just doing my duty! So the questio is....


when you are on the runway and you hear the engines roar and start to move what is happening? How does the plane stay on the runway and then all of a sudden rise up?

(okay guys its me now! have got the godkids sat here and have promised them an answer so please dont be too complicated!!!! lol megans main concern is that how does the captain know when to make the plane lift (quote) and how fast does it go) okay there you go. .....

thanks!!!!


p.s. These two are future airliners/net buffs!!!!!

71 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 1, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18369 times:

Lift is created by speed. Once an aircraft has reached a certain speed, the air rushing over the wings creates a vacuum under the wings that allows the plane to lift off. When airborne, the only thing keeping it moving is its speed.

There are three points involved in take-off. One is the point at which the plane can no longer be stopped safely on the remaining runway. One is the rotation point, where the nose is lifted up and provides the final bit of lift needed to get the plane airborne. The final is the airborne speed.

If the pilot doesn't set the wings properly for take-off, basically you've got a jet-powered hot rod that could drive all the way to Chicago. Only by the proper combination of engine setting, wing settings (flaps and such) and proper mathematical computations involving weight, temperature, and thrust available, can the flight crew properly and safely get their plane off the ground.



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineGraphic From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18361 times:

As the plane speeds up, the wings start to bear the weight more than the wheels. The pilot rotates about the time the wings bear the full weight of the airplane and continues to accelerate across the ground in a slightly nose-high attitude until the wings have enough lift to not only support the full weight of the airplane, but to also create a lifting force of their own, and the plane rises.

Or something like that.


User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18299 times:

Quote:
As the plane speeds up, the wings start to bear the weight more than the wheels. The pilot rotates about the time the wings bear the full weight of the airplane and continues to accelerate across the ground in a slightly nose-high attitude until the wings have enough lift to not only support the full weight of the airplane, but to also create a lifting force of their own, and the plane rises.

 checkmark 

Extraordinarily well put!! I wish I could have said it that well.



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineKcrwFlyer From United States of America, joined May 2004, 3845 posts, RR: 7
Reply 4, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18298 times:

I thought that the wings were what kept it in the air the whole flight, and not just takeoff. The shape of the wing provides lift as air passing under the wing moves faster than air passing over the wing.

User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18277 times:

Quoting Chrisjdurber (Thread starter):
How does the plane stay on the runway and then all of a sudden rise up?

Many people here will give you all sorts of scientific answers and talk about lift and drag and co-effiecnts, and quote something called the Bernoulli's principle, but the truth of the matter is, its pure magic!


User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21800 posts, RR: 55
Reply 6, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18253 times:

Lift is created by the air moving around the wing. The engines provide the speed that gets the air moving fast enough to create enough lift to make the plane fly. The plane rises off the runway because when it rotates, the angle that the wing makes with the direction of travel (called angle of attack) increases, which has the effect of creating more lift for any given speed. The increase of lift is enough to get the plane off the ground.

Quoting Chrisjdurber (Thread starter):
megans main concern is that how does the captain know when to make the plane lift (quote) and how fast does it go)

The rotation speed is based upon a number of variables (configuration, weight, etc.). They look it up on a chart (before takeoff), and then when on the roll, they watch the airspeed indicator for that number, and then they start pulling back on the stick. As for how fast it goes, generally anywhere from 120-160kts for an airliner.

I guess that's the simple version.

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineHaggis79 From Germany, joined Jun 2006, 1096 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18202 times:

Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 1):
creates a vacuum under the wings



Quoting KcrwFlyer (Reply 4):
The shape of the wing provides lift as air passing under the wing moves faster than air passing over the wing.

most definitely not.... if the air under the wing would be flowing faster than the one over the wing you would have a lower pressure under the wing than over it.... effectively sucking the aircraft downwards not upwards.... certainly something you wanna avoid at all costs  Wink. Same thing holds of course for a vacuum under the wings...

in fact, it's the exact opposite: the air flows faster over the wing than below it creating overpressure below the wing and underpressure above it... both the overpressure below the wing as well as the underpressure above it result in an upward force onto the wing... so the airplane is "carried" by the combined forces of those two effects.



300 310 319/20/21 332/3 343 AT4/7 143 B19 732/3/4/5/G/8/9 742/4 752/3 763/4 77E/W CR2/7/9 D95 E45/70 F50 F70 100 M11 M90
User currently offlineRedngold From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 6907 posts, RR: 44
Reply 8, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18185 times:

Quoting KcrwFlyer (Reply 4):
I thought that the wings were what kept it in the air the whole flight, and not just takeoff. The shape of the wing provides lift as air passing under the wing moves faster than air passing over the wing.

This is true - the wings "carry" the plane throughout flight. However, without the thrust of the engines there would not be enough airspeed to create the lift. Therefore it is a balance between thrust and the angle of wings with relation to directional airspeed that keeps the plane flying. Most planes must keep a slight nose-up attitude to achieve this balance, usually around 3 degrees. This is why some people can tell when a plane begins to descend from cruising altitude; the pilot literally levels the nose and this creates more drag, thus beginning descent.



Up, up and away!
User currently offlinePilotaydin From Turkey, joined Sep 2004, 2539 posts, RR: 51
Reply 9, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18188 times:

in the case of the A340, the earth's curvature enable it to get airborn, but all other aircraft go by newton's third law and the downwash/vacuum theory  Smile


The only time there is too much fuel onboard, is when you're on fire!
User currently offlinePope From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18146 times:

Here's a simple way to demonstrate all of this:

Grab a piece of paper. Hold it by its corners against your bottom lip. Blow over the top of the paper and see what happens.

Faster moving air exerts less pressure over the top surface of the paper than the still air below it. Higher (relative) pressure below pushes against the paper and causes the it to rise.

The engines produce the thrust that cause the air to move over the top of the wing. Due to the wing's shape the air moving over the top moves faster than the air moving below. Take that differential in air pressure per sq inch, multiply it by the surface area of the wing and you've got the amount of weight the aircraft can lift.


User currently offlineLAXspotter From India, joined Jan 2007, 3650 posts, RR: 5
Reply 11, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18137 times:

Quoting Pilotaydin (Reply 9):
in the case of the A340, the earth's curvature enable it to get airborn

I guess, you wont be flying TK's A340 anytime soon.  Big grin



"Patriotism is the last refuge of the scoundrel" Samuel Johnson
User currently offlineLASOctoberB6 From Japan, joined Nov 2006, 2380 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18132 times:

Quoting Pilotaydin (Reply 9):
in the case of the A340, the earth's curvature enable it to get airborn,

i dont get it....



[NOT IN SERVICE] {WEStJet}
User currently offlineJetjack74 From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 7421 posts, RR: 50
Reply 13, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18123 times:
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Quoting Chrisjdurber (Thread starter):
(okay guys its me now! have got the godkids sat here and have promised them an answer so please dont be too complicated!!!! lol megans main concern is that how does the captain know when to make the plane lift (quote) and how fast does it go) okay there you go. .....

Check out my videos. I filmed this in a Northwest Airlines DC9 on a ferry flight from IAD-DCA. Flight time was approximately 18 minutes from take-off to touchdown. It's a complete phase of flight:
Taxi and Pre-take-off checklist


The take-off roll.


On the decsent


Final approach into DCA



Made from jets!
User currently offlinePope From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 18090 times:

Quoting LASOctoberB6 (Reply 12):
i dont get it....

It's a sophomoric swipe at the A340's purported lack of engine thrust.


User currently offlineCYatUK From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2006, 811 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 18066 times:

Quoting Haggis79 (Reply 7):
most definitely not.... if the air under the wing would be flowing faster than the one over the wing you would have a lower pressure under the wing than over it.... effectively sucking the aircraft downwards not upwards.... certainly something you wanna avoid at all costs . Same thing holds of course for a vacuum under the wings...

in fact, it's the exact opposite: the air flows faster over the wing than below it creating overpressure below the wing and underpressure above it... both the overpressure below the wing as well as the underpressure above it result in an upward force onto the wing... so the airplane is "carried" by the combined forces of those two effects.

Spot On. Just to add that the shape of the wing is generally called an "aerofoil".

One of the functions of the winglets is exactly to stop the "interaction" of air between the two sides of the wing that have different pressure when the plane is flying i.e. separate low pressure above the wing and high pressure below.

Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 1):
wing settings (flaps and such) and proper mathematical computations involving weight, temperature, and thrust available, can the flight crew properly and safely get their plane off the ground.

The flaps are there to increase the wing surface area. The more area you have, the more lift you get for the same speed. However, you need to bear in mind that by increasing the wing area, the drag increases as well. That's why flaps are not fully extended for take off.



CY@Uk
User currently offlineGraphic From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 18032 times:

Quoting Haggis79 (Reply 7):
in fact, it's the exact opposite: the air flows faster over the wing than below it creating overpressure below the wing and underpressure above it... both the overpressure below the wing as well as the underpressure above it result in an upward force onto the wing... so the airplane is "carried" by the combined forces of those two effects.

Actually, you're both kinda right. The point of stagnation on a wing surface while varying, is generally about a third up from the bottom of the wing. If I had a diagram this would be much easier, but alas I shall continue anyway... Now, because the splitting of airflow going over the top of the wing and the bottom of the wing doesn't occur right at the bottom of the wing but slightly up from it, the air below the wings is accelerated somewhat (this is why most Pitot masts you see on light aircraft are extended down below the wing surface, so they can tap into the unaccelerated airflow and read an accurate airspeed), creating a slight vacuum below the wings. Because there's more vertical wing area above the stagnation point, the air above the stagnation point is accelerated more, causing a greater drop in pressure than below the wing, thereby offsetting the vacuum below the wing and providing a vacuum of its own to boot.

Quoting Redngold (Reply 8):
However, without the thrust of the engines there would not be enough airspeed to create the lift.

Not at all true. Every aircraft has a speed, called L/Dmax, also known as the best glide airspeed, at the very bottom of the airplane's induced/parasite drag curves, that is, the airspeed where the least amount of drag acts on the airplane. To understand L/Dmax, you must first understand drag. Drag comes in 2 basic types: Parasitic, caused by all the shit hanging off the airplane, and Induced: The drag that is the result of the production of lift. Again the diagrams would be handy...anyway... As airspeed increases, parasitic drag increases, because the air behind things like antannaes, rivets, even paint flakes, becomes more turbulent, and the assosciated vacuum becomes much stronger, whereas at low speeds, the air behind these objects isn't as turbulent, so the vacuum behind them is less powerful. Now the exact opposite is true with induced drag. As airspeed increases, induced drag decreases, simply because at slower airspeeds, the wing needs to work harder to produce the lift needed to keep the airplane in level flight. The result is an increased angle of attack. Because the AOA increases, the airflow behind the wing becomes more turbulent, creating a drag force. At higher airspeeds, the wing is pretty much just there, it doesn't need a high AOA to keep the airplane aloft, so the airflow is much more smooth and the drag force is negligable. Now back to L/Dmax. L/Dmax is the airspeed at which the parasitic drag force and induced drag force are exactly the same. Called best glide airspeed because, simply put, that's the speed a pilot shoots for if he loses all power and needs to land safely. You won't fly level at L/Dmax, but the wings will still produce lift and you won't "fall out of the sky."


User currently offlineRedngold From United States of America, joined Mar 2000, 6907 posts, RR: 44
Reply 17, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 14 hours ago) and read 17902 times:

Quoting Graphic (Reply 16):
Every aircraft has a speed, called L/Dmax, also known as the best glide airspeed, at the very bottom of the airplane's induced/parasite drag curves, that is, the airspeed where the least amount of drag acts on the airplane. To understand L/Dmax, you must first understand drag.

Yadda yadda...

Okay, I may have oversimplified. All airliners can glide for some distance without engine thrust. Keeping at altitude, however, is a different story (unless your aircraft is built to glide and light enough to lift on air currents alone.)



Up, up and away!
User currently offlineAAR90 From United States of America, joined Jan 2000, 3481 posts, RR: 46
Reply 18, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 17784 times:

Quoting Chrisjdurber (Thread starter):
when you are on the runway and you hear the engines roar and start to move what is happening? How does the plane stay on the runway and then all of a sudden rise up?

(okay guys its me now! have got the godkids sat here and have promised them an answer so please dont be too complicated!!!! lol megans main concern is that how does the captain know when to make the plane lift (quote) and how fast does it go) okay there you go. .....

What is happening? The engines are producing THUST which is pushing/pulling the airplane forward. Go fast enough and the wings produce LIFT which lifts the airplane in the air.
How does the plane stay on the runway? The pilots steer it... similar to steering your family automobile (a bit more complex than that, but the kids will understand that analogy).
How does the captain know when to make the plane lift? Tell Megan the pilots have airspeed indicators (similar to your automobile's speedometer) and that is how we know "when to make the plane lift."  Wink
How fast does it go? During takeoffs, anywhere between 100-200 miles per hour --depending upon type of airplane, weight, airport altitude, wing configuration, engine thrust used, and a whole lot of other things. Just one of the reasons pilots have lots of schooling before becoming pilots and lots of schooling after becoming pilots.... we're always going back to school.  Wink

AAR90
CA B738 AA KSNA



*NO CARRIER* -- A Naval Aviator's worst nightmare!
User currently offlineChinaClipper40 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 177 posts, RR: 2
Reply 19, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 17668 times:

Quoting Haggis79 (Reply 7):
...air flows faster over the wing than below it creating overpressure below the wing and underpressure above it... both the overpressure below the wing as well as the underpressure above it result in an upward force onto the wing... so the airplane is "carried" by the combined forces of those two effects.



Quoting Graphic (Reply 16):
...because the splitting of airflow going over the top of the wing and the bottom of the wing doesn't occur right at the bottom of the wing but slightly up from it, the air below the wings is accelerated somewhat..., creating a slight vacuum below the wings. Because there's more vertical wing area above the stagnation point, the air above the stagnation point is accelerated more, causing a greater drop in pressure than below the wing, thereby offsetting the vacuum below the wing and providing a vacuum of its own to boot.

Okay, I THINK I understand this. And this is the reason that wings are basically curved on their top surfaces and basically flat on their bottom surfaces, right? To create more surface area and faster airflow on the top of the wing as compared to the bottom of the wing - and therefore to create lift, right? Okay, then how is it that airplanes can fly upside down? How does an upside down airfoil keep an aircraft in the air? I know it's possible from my years of service in the U.S. Air Force, including rides in F-104s during which the plane was inverted in flight for prolonged time periods (yes, that dates me, doesn't it?). But I never understood the physics of inverted flight - and why it was so easy for the pilots I flew with to simply flip the plane over and continue in level flight at the same altitude. Please don't flame me. I'm a medical school professor, not a pilot or engineer or physicist. My USAF flying was done as a medical officer putting in required flight time. Is it a matter of angle of attack? If so, how does it work? How much difference in angle of attack is required to keep a plane airborne in level flight upside-down versus rightside-up? Can anyone give me a quick and simple explanation of inverted flight for dummies? Thanks.

ChinaClipper40


User currently offlineLASOctoberB6 From Japan, joined Nov 2006, 2380 posts, RR: 1
Reply 20, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 17619 times:

Quoting Pope (Reply 14):

It's a sophomoric swipe at the A340's purported lack of engine thrust.

why would you underpower a massive plane such as the A346? and why wont they fix that?



[NOT IN SERVICE] {WEStJet}
User currently offlineKcrwFlyer From United States of America, joined May 2004, 3845 posts, RR: 7
Reply 21, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 17516 times:

Quoting LASOctoberB6 (Reply 20):
why would you underpower a massive plane such as the A346? and why wont they fix that?

It isnt really "underpowered". Its just less overpowered than say.. a 777.

Is it true that all aircraft are actually overpowered in relation to the amount of thrust theyd need to operate safely?


User currently offlineDL787932ER From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 597 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 17484 times:

[quote=KcrwFlyer,reply=21]Is it true that all aircraft are actually overpowered in relation to the amount of thrust theyd need to operate safely?



No.  Silly

But my guess is that you mean multiengine commercial transport airplanes. In which case, kinda. The certification requirement is that the airplane be able to continue a takeoff safely after an engine failure at V1 (below which speed you can stop safely on the remaining runway). So if (x-1) engines produce enough power to continue a takeoff safely, (x) engines produce "more than enough" power to do so. That's a reason why twins like 777s can be considered "more overpowered" than quads like 340s - on a 340, losing one engine still leaves you three, so if you need (x) thrust to take off, three engines produce at least (x) thrust, and four produce (4/3*x) thrust. On a 777, losing one engine leaves you one, so that one engine has to produce (x) for takeoff thrust, and both engines operating can give you (2x) thrust.



F L Y D E L T A J E T S
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 23, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 17375 times:

Quoting ChinaClipper40 (Reply 19):
Is it a matter of angle of attack? If so, how does it work? How much difference in angle of attack is required to keep a plane airborne in level flight upside-down versus rightside-up? Can anyone give me a quick and simple explanation of inverted flight for dummies? Thanks.

ChinaClipper40, faster aircraft often have a symmetrical aerofoil section - same curvature on the top and bottom of the wing - because, at the speeds they fly, the turbulence generated by the angle of attack is sufficient to generate enough lift. The angle of attack (incidence angle) only needs to be a degree or two. Flying inverted, all you do is keep an eye on the horizon and raise or lower the nose (tricky because the elevators work in reverse, but it soon becomes automatic) until the aeroplane stays level. Effectively, in inverted flight the aeroplane is flying a little 'nose-up' (i.e. 'nose-down but upside down,' if you see what I mean!  ) but you don't notice that because the angles are small. Some good diagrams on here that may help the kids understand:-

http://www.aeromech.usyd.edu.au/aero/aerointro/what_is_lift.shtml

Quoting LASOctoberB6 (Reply 20):
why would you underpower a massive plane such as the A346? and why wont they fix that?

Bigger engines require more fuel, and fuel is heavy (over six pounds per US gallon). Every airliner design involves a tradeoff between engine power , range, and weight. If they put bigger engines on the A340 it wouldn't 'go the distance.'

[Edited 2007-03-15 02:56:56]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offline707atDc8 From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 9 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 8 months 2 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 17353 times:

Well kids it's like this, after the driver (Pilot) moves the accelerator (Throttles) forward, he or she !! use's the steering wheel (Tiller) to keep the AeroPlane right in the middle of the road (Runway) , the AeroPlane must reach Superman speed going down the road (Runway) about 180kts (Real Fast) this then creates a big "Marshmallow" like amount of air-pressure under the AeroPlanes arms (Wings) and almost no Marshmallows (air-pressure) over / on top of the arms (Wings) and it's this invisible pressure differential (big fluffy Marshmallows under and no Marshmallows over) that allows the AeroPlane to sit or float through the Air, all the while being pushed very fast by it's Aerosol cans (Jet Engines) under the arms (Wings) .... The End ....

25 NAV20 : Just to clarify, directional control at speed is also aerodynamic (by using the rudder) and that is worked by the rudder pedals, not the yoke ('steer
26 707atDc8 : Hey !!! NAV20, it's just a joke for KID'S !!!, you know how kids are don't you ??, remember ???, you got to get their attention with the Funny stuff f
27 Post contains links and images Graphic : Dammit now I need a diagram Ok, the coefficient of lift equation. CL = L / (1/2pV2 A) CL is the Coefficient of Lift, L is the lift produced, p is the
28 Post contains images NAV20 : Sorry, 707, bridled a bit at the 'steering-wheel' bit!   We may as well get it right as far as Chrisjdurbar is concerned, it's up to him how much he
29 KevinSmith : Oh please!!!! That Bernoullii guy was a quack. Streamtubes and A1V1=A2V2=A3V3, geez what a nut job.
30 Post contains images Fridgmus : Jetjack74, Thanks for the great videos Jack, especially for those of us outside the Aviation Industry! Marc
31 KevinSmith : Well they really aren't if you are flying at a 0 degree inverted pitch attitude.. You change the camber of the wing when up side down as well as the
32 Post contains images Hmmmm... : Don't fill your Godkids with all that Bernoulli nonsense. Bernoulli spoke of the compressibility of fluids, that have very little to do with this conc
33 Graphic : The problem with Newton's laws and Bernoulli's principle being used in this argument is that they are both valid arguments. Fluid flowing faster than
34 Post contains links and images FlyDeltaJets87 : Anyone know where we can find that rejected takeoff video in the AC 767? That guy certainly knew what he was talking about and could help clear things
35 Dc1030guy : I disagree with what you are saying -- partly. Yes, I would agree that some lift is created by the air hitting the bottom of the wing. However, this
36 Shawn Patrick : Thank you!! You are right, Bernoulli's lift does contribute to the total lift, but it is much less than you think. When an airplane is in level fligh
37 Post contains images YYZSaabGuy : Sophomoric yes, but still worth a laugh. Unfortunately, I was drinking coffee while reading it......
38 BeechNut : Hey I enjoyed the videos! Potomac river approach into DCA is a cool, semi-Kai Tak affair. Brought back many memories, I had the pleasure of a couple o
39 Max777geek : Actually the vacuum is created "over" the wings, while high pressure stays under. The explanation of this is in the shape of the wing itself, which i
40 Post contains links Max777geek : Im sorry I saw too late the concept was already explained in oher posts. The interesting fact of the wing shape causing lift, in my opinion, and Im t
41 Motopolitico : WOW it took 7 whole replies before those grossly inaccurate statements were refuted. Those two guys even had RRs higher than zero. Thank you, Haggis.
42 Stratofortress : Put your godkids in a car, open the windows, and have them stick out their hands.... Then explain to them that airplane has really big hands, and real
43 DeC : Amazing videos my friend, thanks a lot for sharing.
44 Jetjack74 : No problem
45 Femme : Fascinating thread to read and contains a lot of my often wondered questions answered .....Thanks guys !! Still marvel at the whole take off thing tho
46 Ultrapig : You godless secularists 43 posts and not one mention of God? It is he/she who makes the plane rise and if you are bad he/she makes it go down. Allah/J
47 Post contains images PanAm747 : Thank you! I knew no matter which way I remembered it, it would be wrong. Part of me even thought the laws of physics would change JUST to prove me i
48 Ferroviarius : Good afternoon! Interestingly enough, phenomena quite similar to those that keep an airplane - or a helicopter, where the lift is created by "rapidly
49 YULWinterSkies : No, instead thank you for bringing in a topic different from the usual B vs A boredom... ... although it did not less more than 10 replies to bring t
50 Post contains images PU752 :
51 Chuchoteur : Now that's a good practical example... really like it! :o)
52 AirWillie6475 : The collective will of the passengers.
53 Graphic : Actually most types of flaps (Slotted, Plain, and Split) don't increase the wing surface area of the wing, they only artificially increase the wing ca
54 Pygmalion : come on guys... there is no vacuum above or below the wing... any vacuum would be filled immediately by the surrounding air... there are no walls or a
55 Starlionblue : Wing shape can also contribute to lift.
56 Graphic : I liked my simple explanation in reply 2.
57 Sprout5199 : Helicopters don't create lift---they are so ugly the earth repels them. Dan in Jupiter
58 Post contains images FlyDeltaJets87 : Man, I hope UH60FtRucker doesn't see this statement.
59 Post contains images Pilotaydin : close....that's a secondary way actually, it's more a matter of CL and lift, not so much area some flaps dont change the area of a wing dont forget t
60 Pygmalion : Very true, a spinning tube perpendicular to the flow will also generate lift as will a tube with an air jet aka rotorless tail of a helo MD style. Bu
61 Baron52ta : I think you will find the vacuum is actually over, not under the wing, this is why a Formula 1 race cars wing is upside down so the faster it goes th
62 Post contains images Pygmalion : the fact that the air pressure under the wing is higher than the air pressure over the wing does not in any way create a vacuum... or suction.
63 Glydrflyr : Actually, it can be done, but not for steering purposes. It's called "Walking the Dog" and is best done with low powered tail draggers. Once the tail
64 Graphic : Words of wisdom garnered through experience?
65 SJC4Me : jetjack74, those are awesome videos. thanks for sharing!
66 Post contains images Mika : I do beg to differ! Thank you!
67 Glydrflyr : Yeah, but just not my own personal experience.
68 Post contains images RedTailDTW : So True! Mason
69 Robsawatsky : What is sad is that the explanation given for the physics behind lift and aircraft wings as presented in most science texts for school kids is so wron
70 Post contains links Starlionblue : Agreed. The problem with explaining lift to laypersons is that an accurate explanation requires quite a lot of math. "Common" explanations (such as B
71 KiwiTEAL : Kids are funny like that............... cool that they are so interested So good that there aren't heaps of "pull the stick back and you go up in the
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What Happens To Laid-off Pilots? posted Thu May 8 2003 05:15:14 by Dandy_don
BA ORD Incident- Near Miss During Take Off Roll posted Mon Mar 31 2003 07:39:08 by Ammunition
Your Favorite Engine Sound During Take Off posted Thu Nov 22 2001 03:29:59 by Wadha
What Happens During A/B/C/D Checks? posted Tue Nov 13 2001 16:46:46 by Flybulldog
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