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737NG Dispatch/Scheduling Question  
User currently offlinePositiverate From United States of America, joined May 2005, 1590 posts, RR: 8
Posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1789 times:

I recently flew AirTran from DCA to LAS via ATL, and a question occurred to me while on board the ATL-LAS leg: do airlines that fly the 737NG, and who are currently in the process of retrofitting them with winglet kits, try to schedule the airplanes that have been retrofitted on the longer legs to more fully realize the advantages of the winglets? On my flight to LAS, the 737 we were on did not have winglets (the one coming back did). Both DCA-ATL legs did not have winglets either. I'm hoping OPNL will weigh in, but are there any dispatchers from AA, FL, AS, or ATA who also can weigh in?

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineHikesWithEyes From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 816 posts, RR: 7
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 1769 times:

From an AS perspective:
All but 2 of our 73Gs have winglets, but there really hasn't been a concerted effort to keep the wingletted
aircraft on certain routes. I think if we had a larger fleet, say 40, and 30 had winglets, then there might be
an effort to keep the winglets on longer legs, or on SNA flights, but the way they are routed usually means that
they end up on at least a couple of long stage flights a day anyway.



First, benzene in my Perrier, and now this!
User currently offlinePositiverate From United States of America, joined May 2005, 1590 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 1728 times:

Quoting HikesWithEyes (Reply 1):
there really hasn't been a concerted effort to keep the wingletted
aircraft on certain routes.

That's kind of what I thought. I presume it's a scheduling nightmare to do so.


User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 10 hours ago) and read 1672 times:

When we first started seeing wingletted -700s here, they were routed just as they had been before, namely for maintenance considerations. I can't think of any that were routed for fuel savings, since, that aside, the aircraft still have to end up at certain overnight points for maintenance work, or be in a position to the next night or two...

User currently offlinePositiverate From United States of America, joined May 2005, 1590 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1614 times:

Quoting OPNLguy (Reply 3):

Thanks for answering my question. I happened to be on the train going from terminal D to the main terminal at LAS witht he piltos who brought us in, and asked them as well. Both of them said that it wasn't something they ever really thought about and said on the longer legs they have flown that by and large they have seen the wingletted airplanes. They also said though that it could be purely coincidence.


User currently offlineLaxintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25436 posts, RR: 49
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1606 times:

I know a larger European airline that operates a mixed winglet and non winglet 737-800 fleet. While not always posisble, there are certain longer haul or performance restricted legs that the carrier "attempts" to schedule winglet aircraft on from its hub. As more and more of the fleet gets winglets this will obviously get easier to accomplish.


From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineOPNLguy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 months 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 1588 times:

Quoting Positiverate (Reply 4):
witht he piltos who brought us in, and asked them as well. Both of them said that it wasn't something they ever really thought about and said on the longer legs they have flown that by and large they have seen the wingletted airplanes. They also said though that it could be purely coincidence.

Well, today that's certainly true. I mean, you're alot more likely to see a -700 on a MDW-LAX or BWI-PHX flight than a -500 or a -300, not just for fuel savings, but for getting the thing off the ground issues.


User currently offlineTokyoNarita From Palau, joined Aug 2003, 570 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 6 months 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 1404 times:

Perhaps the advantage of winglets can be fully realized on a B757 from TXL to EWR or B738 from IAH to ANC. However, those are the extreme examples of situations where the aircraft capabilities are stretched to the limit.

[Edited 2007-03-27 06:08:21]

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