Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
TAM Biggest Strategic Mistake  
User currently offlineEMB195ER From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 254 posts, RR: 8
Posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3493 times:

Hi guys,

In my opinion TAM made its biggest strategic mistake in June last year when they decided not to buy RG. I have a feeling that they believed, at that point, that RG would soon desappear from the market.

Now, that GOL bought the company and, in a matter of time, will bring the international operations back JJ is desperated to get as many international destinations as they can. All of a sudden they are facing the risk of loosing their dominant position not only in the domestic market, but also in the international scene. A prove of this is their recent interest in MAD. JJ has never mentioned MAD before.

I think they know that in the international market RG is a strong competitor. With some cash and good planes, Varig can easily recover its image.

Regards,
Claudio

22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDellatorre From Brazil, joined May 2000, 1088 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3341 times:

Quoting EMB195ER (Thread starter):
Hi guys,

In my opinion TAM made its biggest strategic mistake in June last year when they decided not to buy RG. I have a feeling that they believed, at that point, that RG would soon desappear from the market.

Now, that GOL bought the company and, in a matter of time, will bring the international operations back JJ is desperated to get as many international destinations as they can. All of a sudden they are facing the risk of loosing their dominant position not only in the domestic market, but also in the international scene. A prove of this is their recent interest in MAD. JJ has never mentioned MAD before.

I think they know that in the international market RG is a strong competitor. With some cash and good planes, Varig can easily recover its image.

I don't agree with you!

TAM always has had a reputation for being a well managed airline and they tend to make decisions based on consistency, specially concerning the commence of new international destinations. TAM was already serving Paris & Miami for years and when they started new flights to New York and later London not too long ago. Their moves usually go towards opening a new market and then developing it. That is what happened with CDG, MIA & JFK.

Another thing. Back in June last year, airlines had no guarentee whatsoever that the acquisition of RG would'n bring all those debts & problems that had almost shut down RG. Remeber those airplanes parked in GIG due to disputes with Leasing Companies. RG was in total caos, and on by a "miracle" and very questionalble move by the government, RG got back on air, after being sold under the New Varig slogan.

Considering the above, TAM did the right thing!!! If they ever made a mistake, was letting RG being sold to GOL now!
Although, honestly, I don't think they were very insterested.

Also, I believe GOL+VARIG don't pose that much of a threat to TAM, speciaaly on their European & American markets. There is almost zero chance of RG competing equally with TAM in CDG, LHR, MIA & JFK. Not to mention the other airlines that are now also operating on these markets. RG's reputation is not what is used to be internationally, and premium & frequent flyer pax will probably stick with JJ.

RG only oppotunity is to increase their dominace in LAtin American markets. Al least for now, Europe & USA are under JJ, AF+KLM, TP, IB & LH+LX hands.


User currently offlineJfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8372 posts, RR: 7
Reply 2, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 6 hours ago) and read 3231 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

GOL & RG have promised to lease 767, not the best airplane to have a premuim image these days. TAM's international fleet is made up of A330-200 and soon 773ER's, two of the most advanced planes around.

User currently offlineEMB195ER From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 254 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 3045 times:

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 1):
I don't agree with you!

You made some good points, but i still stick to the fact that it was a mistake or maybe a wrong strategy. I agree that they took years to open/improve Paris and Miami, but now, all of a sudden, they are talking about FRA, MAD and LAX. This large international expansion was not in their plans at all (not at this speed at least). Otherwise, they would have planned in advance the aquisition of more wb. Don't you think so?

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 1):
RG only oppotunity is to increase their dominace in LAtin American markets. Al least for now, Europe & USA are under JJ, AF+KLM, TP, IB & LH+LX hands.

There is a very good way to compete with these airlines and do you know what it is? Price!! Have a look at the price of tickets to Europe at the moment. You can't get anything cheaper than U$800,00 and all flights are always packed. I think GOL is prepared to have small profits on these flights while they are working on RG brand and getting new airplanes.

Quoting Jfk777 (Reply 2):
GOL & RG have promised to lease 767, not the best airplane to have a premuim image these days. TAM's international fleet is made up of A330-200 and soon 773ER's, two of the most advanced planes around.

Varig won't keep these 767 forever. It is an immediate solution only. GOL's CEO has already said that these airplanes will be flying until they place a new order to Airbus or Boing.

Regards,
Claudio


User currently offlineIncitatus From Brazil, joined Feb 2005, 4014 posts, RR: 13
Reply 4, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 3038 times:

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 1):
TAM always has had a reputation for being a well managed airline and they tend to make decisions based on consistency, specially concerning the commence of new international destinations. TAM was already serving Paris & Miami for years and when they started new flights to New York and later London not too long ago. Their moves usually go towards opening a new market and then developing it. That is what happened with CDG, MIA & JFK.

There is another entirely different interpretation to the situation: TAM is well managed but is very conservative - its risk averseness is damaging in the long run. TAM being #1 internationally is a mere accident, a result of Varig's demise as opposed to a well orchestrated hunt for the top stop. No wonder they are big in Paris, they avoided expanding to other cities in Europe for many years. Same for Miami.

Recently I read an interview with Bologna and I was very disappointed. Yes, he is a great bean counter. Poor or no vision whatsoever though.

TAM is bound to be an average company. Start with the name, which has been overdue for a change for about 20 years.



Stop pop up ads
User currently offlineLipeGIG From Brazil, joined May 2005, 11438 posts, RR: 58
Reply 5, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 2927 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

Quoting EMB195ER (Thread starter):
In my opinion TAM made its biggest strategic mistake in June last year when they decided not to buy RG. I have a feeling that they believed, at that point, that RG would soon desappear from the market.



Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 1):
Another thing. Back in June last year, airlines had no guarentee whatsoever that the acquisition of RG would'n bring all those debts & problems that had almost shut down RG

IMO, TAM made the mistake now as they know Gol is looking for buying Varig. As very well said by Dellatorre, at time of the auction, there are several doubts about the power of the new bankruptcy law in Brazil and now after some time and discussions, it's very clear that "New" Varig is protected against "old" Varig creditors.

Now TAM is really on a critical moment: Gol keep the frequencies they want, but now the fight is against another player with large cash flow position and also looking for international routes with an established domestic route. The fact is that, TAM took so long to begin a real international expansion, and now will face a strong and hard competitor with the rights for some very interesting markets like FRA, LHR, MXP and MEX. And as some routes does not multi-operators (mostly routes can handle only 2 operators), MAD for example is not on JJ range now as BRA and RG keep the rights. LAX is the same, Ocean Air and RG keep the designation.

And other important matter, competition will become stronger in São Paulo. With up to 10 new flights to be added soon ( EZE, SCL, MEX, MIA, JFK, MAD, MXP, LHR, FRA) i would say that fares will go down even more (this year in fact is better than the last one... you can find deals like MIA with AA for only US$ 709, JFK for US$ 760, , MUC for US$ 820, and also some interesting deals for Business Class). Also remember that Emirates, Air France, Tap (ANAC just approved their 21 weekly flights request), Taca, Ocean Air are launching new services or improving existing ones as well as the new US-Argentina bilateral will reduce the demand for US services. Yields will go down.

Felipe



New York + Rio de Janeiro = One of the best combinations !
User currently offlineSAOAP From Brazil, joined Mar 2005, 170 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 2810 times:

The truth is that TAM has known for a while now that Gol would overtake them in the domestic market (and, more importantly, throughout South America) by early 2008. But, they never dreamed that their dominance in the international market would be challenged so soon. In short, TAM didn't see the picture (they see it now though).

On a personal level, one thing that always bothered me was that even with all the success TAM's enjoyed during the last few years, they are still 'taxi aéreo minded' (locals will know what I mean). In short for non-locals: TAM started out as a small business jet company ("air taxi" concept if one can call it that). It's only obvious that the industry is quite different to commercial air transport. Many believe that while TAM has grown, it still retains that original 'way of thinking' which might just have cost them their dominance of the brazilian market.

Cheers!



"When it's dark enough, you can see the stars" - Charles A. Beard
User currently offlineJJMNGR From Brazil, joined May 2004, 1018 posts, RR: 15
Reply 7, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 2758 times:

Nothing is pure truth.

In fact TAM looked to VARIG and decided not to buy. GOL looked and bought. That´s it. Is is not a situation where TAM simply did not look to the business while the other did.

TAM has its own plans of expansion. Fact is that is was decided top grown with or without VARIG and it is being done. JFK, LHR and MXP are very good examples. TAM is not flying to these destinations replacing VARIG. TAM got its own rights to fly as new bilateral negotiations were done. FRA appears again in the scenario because StarAlliance has no presence with a member in Latin America and conversations are being in place with LH and there is a possibility to return to fly to FRA only if an agreement with LH will be in place.

VARIG was number 1 for decades and also was an accident, after what was done with PANAIR. By the way, much more than an accident, was was done with PANAIR at that time was a crime! TAM can´t be blamed for being the actual leader. And to be very honest here, my particular opinion is that this thing of be #1, #2, ...#174 is pure bla,bla,bla...to me what counts is to have a good administration and perform in the market in search of profit! Profit is the correct word and the reason why companies should exist. VARIG was #1....ok...and??? What meant be #1?

I agree that the company is very conservative, but this position was what brought the airline to the actual level. The decisions taken must be respected. If not agreed by some, at least respected.

I think that time will really tell who took the wrong decision; who bought RG or who gave up.

Cheers,


User currently offlineSAOAP From Brazil, joined Mar 2005, 170 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 2 days ago) and read 2689 times:

Quoting JJMNGR (Reply 7):

You're absolutely right - time will tell what was the right decision. At the moment it seems to me like Gol might be a big pain in the neck for TAM as they have enough cash flow for an almost immediate fleet expansion (talking about Varig's wide-body fleet now). Another thing which shouldn't be forgotten is that they have pretty good connections within the Government (as does TAM , I reckon) and an extension of the slots is something which might well be granted - you know all to well in what country we live in.

I agree and at the same time disagree with you on one point however: "profit is the correct word and the reason why companies should exist".

Sure thing, a company is no use if she's not profitable. Still, I'd like to think that there are also other issues which shouldn't be secondary: as you might well know, airlines contribute to the market development as whole - they always have. For instance, let's talk about a hypothetical flight between India and Brazil. You'll agree with me that such a flight is not viable in the beginning, on the long run however, it might well help build a bridge and help develop partnership between the two developing countries (I still have my doubts about Brazil, but that's another issue) allowing for new commercial opportunities to arise. Hence, on the long run, it could, in theory, become a very profitable route. Another example: China. China is without a doubt "the" booming market. Consequently it would, again, in theory, make perfect sense to invest in this market and create a link between Brazil and China. Sometimes you have to take chances and invest in a new market because it might well become a 'cash-cow' (both for the airline as well as for other business').

In the long run we have to remember that airlines are here to serve the public, to carry the passenger from point A to point B. Consequently, as a brazilian I'm happy to see that we might well have 3 very strong brands representing Brazil in the aviation industry.

Cheers!



"When it's dark enough, you can see the stars" - Charles A. Beard
User currently offlineDellatorre From Brazil, joined May 2000, 1088 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 2591 times:

IMHO

GOL shouldn't keep the Varig Brand coexisting with its own. There are examples in the airline industry that indicate this just doesn't quite work. This is the major problem to mee: Two aviation strong brands in Brazil that have opposite meanings. One is know by it's glamourous & imponent status of being once the national carrier and symbol of Brazil for decades, but still carries a painfull process of self-destruction on its shoulder, and another being one of the most succesful cases in the aviation industry, among the whole low cost, efficiency, at some point low fares & profitability arguments. In another words, on is the past & another the future. Can those two really walk hands together?? When I hear something about the whole acquisition I still can't pictured the too companies side by side. Even know the old Varig is dead, or almost, the real reason G3 bought it is to have all those benefits the old one once had. Gol wants to expand, go to profitable long haul markets, and the need to buy RG is totally understandable. My question is:

By keep both brands, isn't Gol putting it's own brand & future in jeopardy??? Could a sucessfull RG brand surpass Gol's and become the dominat??? Wouldn't that be putting to much at stake???

I know this is a bit hypotherical, but to mee it just doesn't feels right.

ANy thoughts???


User currently offlineSAOAP From Brazil, joined Mar 2005, 170 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 2542 times:

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 9):

Both brands complement each other: 1 premium carrier and 1 no frills carrier. This exists elsewhere...

Lufthansa + Germanwings

Seems to work just fine.



"When it's dark enough, you can see the stars" - Charles A. Beard
User currently offlineETA Unknown From Comoros, joined Jun 2001, 2077 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 2479 times:

If TAM thought Varig's route authorities were worth the asking price, I'm sure they would have submitted a bid. The fact they stayed clear of Varig was probably a good move- besides, thre re plenty of international destinations TAM can still expand to even if Varig's rights are to more prestigious destinations.

User currently offlineEMB195ER From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 254 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2374 times:

Quoting ETA Unknown (Reply 11):
thre re plenty of international destinations TAM can still expand to even if Varig's rights are to more prestigious destinations.

This is the biggest problem of TAM, they don't want to open new markets. They want to explore markets already established. In terms of profitability it makes sense, but sometimes airlines have to take some risks. See for instance TAP, they assumed many risks when they started their flights to cities like SSA, REC, FOR and NAT. Nowadays we know these flights are all profitable, but were they profitable when they started???

Also, who in the past imagined an airline successfully flying between Central America and Brazil?? Today Copa has 4 flights to Brazil and all seem to be going very well. Again, another example of an airline that took some risks.

Finally, we have the example of Air China flying to GRU. Initially it sounded very akward, people were critisezing, saying that the stop in MAD would kill the flight and that there were more convenient alternatives in the market. However, according to an article published at Folha de Sao Paulo today, their load factor is around 85%. In my opinion it is quite good. Obviously, we have to consider that they are flying only twice a week, but it is a very good start.

A long time ago I read an interview with Mr. Ozires Silva, ex RG's CEO. He was saying that opening a new route is not only having an airplane flying to that destination, but there are huge investiments like advertising the new flight, establishing relationships with local business, etc... If I am not wrong, he was saying that a new international destination needs something around 2 years to start generating some revenue.

But going back to JJ topic, with a good relationship with KLM or SN Brussels, Amesterdam or Brussels could, for instance, after 1 or 2 years become very interesting destinations. Or even a flight GRU-LIS-AMS or GRU-LIS-BRU, with 5th freedom could be interesting in my opinion.

Anyway, only my thoughts...  Smile


User currently offlineJJMNGR From Brazil, joined May 2004, 1018 posts, RR: 15
Reply 13, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 2317 times:

SAOAP,

You are right when you say that airlines also develop other markets, but in my opinion the opening of new routes like the example you gave, must have also a Governmental compromise in give funds to the airline, if the airline is not a Governmental company. It is not the case of airlines in Brazil. They are 100% private and money can´t be trowed through windows,


User currently offlineDellatorre From Brazil, joined May 2000, 1088 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 2301 times:

Quoting SAOAP (Reply 10):
Both brands complement each other: 1 premium carrier and 1 no frills carrier. This exists elsewhere...

Lufthansa + Germanwings

Seems to work just fine.

Sorry this comparison just doesn't work!!! Germanwings has never been the main carrier in Germany, like RG once was in Brazil. My point is more in terms how will the market see RG& GOL as two independent companies, which are going to compete with each other. That's not happening. Even though they will coexist in both domestic & international markets, I hardly doubt their image will be much different from one another. GOL has gotten the routes they wanted, why keep Varig???

This whole speech of two different airlines just doesn't cut it. If that really worked, why didn't AA keep TWA brand alive?? It was known worldwide and domestically, specially for the city of ST. Louis.

When a big airline such as LH or IB create a low cost division is one thing. The other way arouns is much more complex. I wonder why Ryanair deal to buy Aer Lingus fell short???


User currently offlineSAOAP From Brazil, joined Mar 2005, 170 posts, RR: 3
Reply 15, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2291 times:

Quoting JJMNGR (Reply 13):

JJMNGR,

I understand what you mean and happen to know for a fact that some airlines really do receive money to keep flying to certain destinations (either from the originating country - i.e. their own Government - or the destination country). This of course doesn't apply to all airlines/routes. Many have to be financed by the airlines themselves. However, this is the result of some (several, sometimes) years of study and is also considered to be a long term strategy for the airline (i.e. keymarket for the future, etc.).

Happy Landings!

Marcelo



"When it's dark enough, you can see the stars" - Charles A. Beard
User currently onlineC010T3 From Brazil, joined Jul 2006, 3703 posts, RR: 19
Reply 16, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2171 times:

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 14):
This whole speech of two different airlines just doesn't cut it. If that really worked, why didn't AA keep TWA brand alive?? It was known worldwide and domestically, specially for the city of ST. Louis.

When a big airline such as LH or IB create a low cost division is one thing. The other way arouns is much more complex. I wonder why Ryanair deal to buy Aer Lingus fell short???

Sorry, but I have to say the same thing about your comparisons. First of all, both TWA and AA enjoyed similar brand recognition figures by the time of the acquisition. They were both prestigious carriers. You can't say that the average American flyer without FFP membership would prefer one carrier over the other, if you had the hypothetical situation of AA and TWA flying the same route, offering the same fare and with departure and arrival at the same time. Now imagine, if the same situation applied to an average Brazilian flyer having to chose between Varig and Gol. The person wouldn't even hesitate to chose Varig. TAM used to face the same problem before the codeshare with Varig. I must say, Gol won't regret keeping the brand. Brazilians forgive and forget easily. Am I wrong? Brazilians like to brag, they like the superfluous and amenities. Why was Gol never able to part themselves from the cereal bars? Because not receiving anything in a flight is unacceptable in the mind of a Brazilian. There is a stigma towards Gol, it is known as the cereal bars airline and that clearly affects its acceptance by the upper middle class and lower upper class. Not to mention that it would have a real hard time positioning itself in the intercontinental market.
I wonder how Ryanair's attempt to buy Aer Lingus has fallen short, since Ryanair still holds 25,2% of Aer Lingus shares. The verdict of the European Commission doesn't come out until June 13. The Open Skies agreement can still change things... Besides, hasn't Aer Lingus morphed into a kind of LCC after 9/11?


User currently offline787KQ From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 549 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2024 times:

Quoting Incitatus (Reply 4):
TAM is bound to be an average company. Start with the name, which has been overdue for a change for about 20 years.

Aren't both names regional in their basis? If so, what's wrong with TAM? It caught on in Brazil and can catch on internationally.


User currently onlineC010T3 From Brazil, joined Jul 2006, 3703 posts, RR: 19
Reply 18, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 2001 times:

Quoting 787KQ (Reply 17):
Aren't both names regional in their basis? If so, what's wrong with TAM? It caught on in Brazil and can catch on internationally.

I think the problem is not Marília, but the fact that it sounds really odd when you pronounce it.


User currently offlineA388 From Netherlands Antilles, joined May 2001, 9819 posts, RR: 11
Reply 19, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 1946 times:

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 1):
Their moves usually go towards opening a new market and then developing it. That is what happened with CDG, MIA & JFK.

CDG, MIA & JFK are not exactly "new" markets as RG served these markets long before JJ did (at least from the major Brazilian cities which is where the money is for JJ as well).

A388


User currently offlineDellatorre From Brazil, joined May 2000, 1088 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1879 times:

Quoting A388 (Reply 19):
CDG, MIA & JFK are not exactly "new" markets as RG served these markets long before JJ did (at least from the major Brazilian cities which is where the money is for JJ as well).

When TAM first started these flights they were new markets for them!!!

Anyways,

Getting back to the topic, I don't think JJ did wrong by letting GOL have RG. Varig didn't have much to offer for JJ, despite some rights in Latin America & in the shuttle service between CGH-SDU. Aparte from that, i don't see why JJ would invest around 400 USD for it.

As many of you pointed out, JJ is very conservative, but on the other hand, they have been strong in key markets such as MIA, JFK, CDG & LHR. They also dominate in Argentina and keep good performance in Chile.

The question is: Can GOL+VARIG be sucessful on their new international venture?? Europe is now ruled by JJ and it's partner AF+KLM, along with TP. Others such as IB and LH also have increased their presence lately.

I wonder how will GOL face competition on these markets.

TAM is probably going after FRA if they can get LH on their side, and AMS+ZRH could be a possibility, specially if they have code share agreements with KL & LX.


User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8964 posts, RR: 39
Reply 21, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 1832 times:

Quoting EMB195ER (Reply 12):
A long time ago I read an interview with Mr. Ozires Silva, ex RG's CEO. He was saying that opening a new route is not only having an airplane flying to that destination, but there are huge investiments like advertising the new flight, establishing relationships with local business, etc... If I am not wrong, he was saying that a new international destination needs something around 2 years to start generating some revenue.

Imagine all that, economic uncertainties, plus the uncertainty of the industry itself. TR collapsed, VP collapsed, RG (massive market share then) in some intangible situation in regards to their future. Then you have GOL rapidly expanding with their LCC model.

In short, I do believe TAM has been a bit too conservative, but it isn't completely unjustified.

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 14):
My point is more in terms how will the market see RG& GOL as two independent companies, which are going to compete with each other.

Remember RG will go for frills versus no-frills.

Perhaps they'll offer a business class between high-yielding markets.

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 14):
GOL has gotten the routes they wanted, why keep Varig???

Brand, domestic & international recognition. . . politics?

Quoting C010T3 (Reply 16):

 checkmark 

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 20):

I'm not sure to what extent, but IMO GOL would be wise to seek partnerships asap.


Cheers!



"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineEMB195ER From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2004, 254 posts, RR: 8
Reply 22, posted (7 years 5 months 2 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1701 times:

Quoting Dellatorre (Reply 20):
I wonder how will GOL face competition on these markets.

IMO there are two ways that GOL can use to face competition:

01 - Price

02 - Offering a good service. When JJ started MIA or CDG they were totally new on these markets and nowadays they are major players. Same thing applies for GOL. They will have to do a very good job at the beginning to prove VARIG is back and is reliable again.

I think because our passition for aviation we are always very impatient and we want the best solution since the beginning. I think GOL will need some time to recover Varig brand in the market, but definitely there is space for RG and JJ.

Quoting C010T3 (Reply 18):
I think the problem is not Marília, but the fact that it sounds really odd when you pronounce it.

There are worse names than TAM, look at BRA. Have you ever checked in a dictionary what it means?  Smile

Claudio


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
I Just Made The Biggest Mistake Of This Vacation posted Mon Jul 11 2005 22:13:24 by Zweed
Branson: Not Starting UK No-frills Biggest Mistake posted Fri Oct 18 2002 11:23:56 by Capt.Picard
Airbus's Biggest Mistake posted Sat Sep 1 2001 15:50:27 by NorthwestMSP
Boeing`s Biggest Mistake? posted Fri Aug 31 2001 19:58:34 by Tristar4ever
TAM: FRA, LAX & CCS On Sight posted Fri Mar 23 2007 23:40:08 by LipeGIG
TAM Anticipates 4Q06 Results Release posted Tue Mar 20 2007 04:31:16 by TACAA320
IAH-TAM Diverted To MFE. posted Fri Mar 16 2007 03:03:20 by Xaapb
Viewing TAM Flights On FlightAware posted Mon Mar 12 2007 01:04:47 by PresRDC
TAM To Fly GIG-MIA Non-stop posted Sun Mar 11 2007 20:13:26 by LipeGIG
TAM Fleet Reaches 100 Aircraft (more Is Coming!) posted Thu Mar 8 2007 16:55:38 by LipeGIG