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FL And The YX Shareholder List  
User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 23148 posts, RR: 20
Posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2535 times:

There was some (off-topic) discussion in the last FL-YX thread about FL's desire to view a copy of YX's shareholder list in advance of MEH's annual meeting. That discussion is located here:

Airtran Raising Midwest Bid Again (by Quickmover Apr 2 2007 in Civil Aviation)

I'm wondering what y'all think FL will accomplish with this list. In accordance with Wisconsin statute, they'll only receive it a few weeks before the annual meeting, and YX now has some time to send whatever propaganda it wants to shareholders. So I'm curious what will happen. Are enough YX shareholders sufficiently unaware that FL will change some minds? Or is it just more grandstanding?

P.S. So as to keep this thread from getting locked, let's try to keep the discussion to the effects of AAI's contact with MEH shareholders.


I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
13 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineSrbmod From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2519 times:

Quoting Cubsrule (Thread starter):
P.S. So as to keep this thread from getting locked, let's try to keep the discussion to the effects of AAI's contact with MEH shareholders.

And to add to this, any bashing of either airline by anyone will deleted and the user possibly suspended. Let's keep it civil and on topic please.


User currently offlineMainland From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 309 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 2386 times:

AirTran has detailed their plan for Midwest again -- it's basically the same key information from their February presentation -- addressing most, if not all, of of Midwest's concerns regarding the WBCL. They lay out their plan again and harp on the conflicts of interest within Midwest's plan -- and takes the time to swipe at Midwest for some of their market failures. Further, they detail routes that had very thin O&D numbers that were transformed into relatively thriving markets upon their entry, and how they can do the same for their proposed routes -- a topic that has been harped upon on these boards previously. (I don't think AirTran's "small communities" of Akron and Bloomington can compare with Midwest's Appleton or Escanaba....but that's just me) The letter they speak of from the mayor of Atlanta is nothing special at all -- it was scanned into the filing, so it couldn't be cut and pasted here.

Seems like a pretty smart plan from AirTran. With the higher bid, Midwest can no longer claim the bid is truly advantageous -- they can fall back on the claim that AirTran's plan for MKE was weak, doesn't take into account all stakeholders, etc.. AirTran has done a pretty good job here, IMO, of taking care of those issues.

Filing found here:
http://www.sec.gov/Archives/edgar/da...45/000119312507077188/dex99a39.htm

Here's the letter:

To: The Members of the Board of Directors of Midwest Air Group

John F. Bergstrom
James Boris
Ulice Payne, Jr.
Samuel K. Skinner
Elizabeth T. Solberg
Richard H. Sonnentag
Frederick Stratton, Jr.
David H. Treitel
Timothy E. Hoeksema

We want to take this opportunity to make clear to you and to the communities and customers served by Midwest Airlines ("Midwest") AirTran's firm commitment to offer the flight schedules and fare levels that we have discussed publicly which in turn will create the numbers of jobs that we have identified and the added value of our operations to suppliers and vendors that support your existing and our proposed expanded operations.

We make this specific and unqualified firm commitment to assist you in exercising your discretion under your Articles of Incorporation and the Wisconsin Business Corporation Law ("WBCL") to consider, along with your primary obligations to your shareholders, the measurable social, legal and economic effects of a transaction on various identified constituencies. In this regard we are addressing the concern expressed by you in your Form SC 14D9 filed on January 25, 2007, with respect to an alleged lack of a clear plan and commitment.

We believe that our proposal represents a win for your shareholders with materially positive effects for your employees, customers, suppliers and the communities that Midwest serves. Each of these constituencies benefits more from this transaction than from Midwest's continuation as is or with even a successful execution of its business plan. The best evidence of what we can do is what we have already done and few have said it as well as Atlanta's Mayor, Shirley Franklin.

Mayor Franklin in the attached April 2, 2007, letter to me commends AirTran for our "impressive" growth over the last several years and our role in keeping the Atlanta economy strong. She observes that our "every day" low fares have "stimulated traffic" and generated "tremendous savings" for the Atlanta consumers while our Boeing 737 aircraft order "has added jobs to the Atlanta economy". As to our community involvement in a city that is not our headquarters,
she calls it "inspiring". We can bring to Milwaukee and the entire Midwest network the consumer benefits, jobs and service that define our role in Atlanta.

We do not believe that the business plan announced by Midwest provides anything approaching the scope and service levels to which we are committed and have demonstrated our ability to achieve or create the number of new jobs that accompany that growth. Since joining AirTran Airways in 1999, this management team has led a financial restructuring, introduced an all new fleet, nearly doubled the size of the network, created thousands of jobs and have delivered consistent profits through one of the most challenging times in our industry.

We have materially increased the value of our offer to $15.00 a share in a combination of cash and stock. As proposed, our offer permits your shareholders to participate in the value enhancement that we believe will follow on the merger of our two airlines. As you know, most Wall Street airline analysts and airline industry experts share our belief in the value of this transaction and AirTran's prospects just as they see marginal value in Midwest as a stand-alone airline.

From the public filings that you have made with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"), it appears that the only third party that has evaluated Midwest's business plan are the employees of your most senior director who reported their findings to him in his capacity as Chairman of your Board Affairs and Governance Committee. The appearance of conflict, self-interest and bad faith presented by these facts, which has drawn critical comment from corporate governance experts, would not appear to support the use of that report in the exercise of your business judgment in determining the Company's future value as an independent entity or the effect of a transaction on the various constituencies. Since you have stated in your SEC filed documents that your financial advisor, Goldman, Sachs & Co. was retained to provide advice on resisting a merger with a financial incentive tied to your remaining independent, clearly even if it had opined on future value or effect on constituencies, its advice on its face is biased.

It is of interest that the airline analyst at Raymond James, the investment banker identified in your SEC filed documents as having been retained to advise you on the AirTran proposal, has published several favorable comments on the benefits of the merger. It is also of interest that since you have refused to engage in any due diligence whatsoever with respect to our proposal there would appear to be no good faith basis on which you could, as is provided in your Articles of Incorporation, look to the indebtedness arising out of the transaction in considering the ongoing viability and prospects of the merged company.

From the time of my October 11, 2006, telephone call with your Chairman and CEO to our meeting on October 20, 2006, and since then, I have set out in detail the logic of this transaction and the benefits that it offers to all the relevant constituencies. I emphasized to him in both conversations the strategic benefits presented by our Boeing 737-700 delivery schedule in expanding service options and jobs in Milwaukee and other communities. While he expressed the view that that delivery schedule was a burden on AirTran, I disagreed and stressed its importance as a growth vehicle for either a combined AirTran and Midwest or AirTran as a stand- alone carrier. Your Chairman's public comments about AirTran's supposed "desperate" need to rid itself of these aircraft make no sense. Even if true and it is not, the aircraft are now in high demand and were acquired at prices that are now well below market generating literally millions of dollars in profit if AirTran were to choose to scale back its growth plans and sell them. From what I said last October to now, my view has not changed and AirTran is able to make firm commitments on service because of the cost-efficient aircraft that we have on order.

By 2009 we are committed to growing Milwaukee to 215 daily departures -- a 34% increase over Midwest's existing operations to a total of 70 destinations. While our Milwaukee operations will be smaller than what we have in Atlanta where we presently have 242 daily departures which this summer will grow to 262, it will be a hub larger than any that would follow on Midwest's proposed plan. We have attached a presentation that we have previously disclosed publicly that identifies specific markets and flights covered by our proposed operations -- one of the claimed deficiencies that you identified in your Form SC 14D9 filing.

We anticipate creating more than 1,100 new jobs with career advancement opportunities for current employees as a result of the increased size of the combined companies. We plan to expand the Milwaukee training facilities, call center and aircraft maintenance operations and add a new marketing services center. We are committed to maintaining jobs for all current Midwest employees except officers and some headquarters positions; our proposal by any measure will result in a net increase in jobs.

With the commitment of at least 22 additional aircraft dedicated to the Milwaukee hub above and beyond the aircraft used to replace Midwest's fleet of aging MD80s, we estimate, based on the standard number of employees associated with each aircraft, that we will create no less than 264 pilot jobs, 396 flight attendant positions, 66 mechanic jobs, 315 airport service personnel positions, 50 call center agent jobs and 25 management positions. We estimate that this job growth will add over $30 million a year in new payroll with over $1.8 million annually in new payroll taxes. Our aircraft delivery schedule supports the growth of the Milwaukee hub and provides the means to achieve this objective.

Our history of growth supports the credibility of our plans for Midwest. Since 2000, AirTran has grown its network from 270 average departures per day to 30 cities to 765 average flights per day serving 56 cities by the summer of 2007. During this period we have created over 5,000 new jobs. While Midwest has claimed in letters to your shareholders and to the Wisconsin business community and elsewhere that AirTran's record for market development and service is questionable, we believe that for that assertion to serve as a decision making criteria you have to apply the same standard to Midwest's prior history as an indicator of what may be expected in its proposed business plan.

Midwest, in that same period since 2000, has terminated service from Milwaukee to 10 markets; from Kansas City to 7 markets; and eliminated some 500 jobs. It has simply abandoned service in markets like Houston, New Orleans and Washington-Dulles; in places like Indianapolis, which it had in the past announced plans to develop, it has materially reduced its presence.

Midwest's newly announced growth plans primarily rely on 50-seat regional jet flying that it has outsourced to a Utah-based regional airline. The limited new flying that Midwest has announced with additional old MD-80s does not generate any significant number of new jobs. The plan as publicly described by your Chairman & CEO as adding 18 planes, 15 of which are 50-seat regional jets; 12 new routes and six new cities provides little economic benefit to the region. Midwest's actions under its business plan have had and will continue to have a negative effect on several of the various constituencies identified in the WBCL.

Whatever positive benefits may reside in the Midwest plan do not come anywhere close to those offered by commitments embedded in AirTran's proposal. On its face, Midwest's announced business plan under the best of circumstances adds fewer flights, routes and jobs than what AirTran has committed to provide. AirTran's proposal is specific in each of these areas. You may want to refer to the attachment to our February 19, 2007, letter to you in which airline analysts from UBS and Calyon Securities speak to Midwest's limited growth opportunities. We believe that third parties understand what you must consider -- that the positive effects of AirTran's proposals outweigh anything that Midwest has announced or in the near term is capable of developing.

AirTran's firm commitments stem in part from our belief that we can grow presently underserved markets and we have a public track record of success in doing so. Many of the markets that we will grow to and from Milwaukee are presently smaller than any of those that we serve out of Atlanta -- exactly the situation that we found in many of our now large Atlanta and non-Atlanta markets. Prior to AirTran's entering the Rochester to Baltimore route there were 42 passengers a day on the route each way, we now carry more than 121 passengers a day, a threefold increase; in Atlanta to Newport News there were 8 passengers a day and today there are more than 255 daily passengers; between Flint and Atlanta there were only 8 daily passengers per day and has now grown to 165. Our low costs allow us to offer low fares that stimulate and grow otherwise underserved markets -- we have done this in many markets around the U.S. and we will do the same in Milwaukee.

Based on our proven model, we estimate that more than 3.7 million additional new travelers to and from Wisconsin as a result of our lower fares and increased level of service. This increased visitor flow would drive more than $467 million a year in non-airport spending on goods and services. We also estimate that the increased level of operations will add more than $11 million annually in new airport fees and more than $18 million a year in airport concession revenue combined in the state.

We also have a record of serving large metropolitan areas like Boston, New York and Washington as well as small communities like Akron-Canton, Bloomington, Newport News and Moline. Midwest's employees, customers and the communities that we will serve will all benefit from our growth to a much greater degree than anything currently operated or being proposed by Midwest.

Our ability to profitably grow is based in large part on our cost structure and efficient operations. Using Department of Transportation ("DOT") data for all markets served from Milwaukee and Atlanta and not the selective sampling of markets standing behind the Midwest analysis in its March 20, 2007, letter to Wisconsin business leaders (Midwest used a DOT report that covers the top 1,000 markets in the entire United States that samples only 66 markets in Atlanta and 31 markets in Milwaukee), AirTran's fares are 27% lower in Atlanta markets where AirTran competes and our average fare in Milwaukee is 28% lower than Midwest's and nearly 50% lower than the industry average. Major Franklin's letter is independent testimony to the value our low fares bring to the communities that we serve. We are one of the low fare leaders and your customers and communities will benefit from that fact. Applying our standard fare model, we estimate that Wisconsin consumers will save in excess of $363 million per year in air fare savings. In contrast, we believe that Midwest's cost structure simply does not allow it to profitably match fares that we are able to offer.

While Midwest raised questions about AirTran's prior record of service in various markets in its February 28, 2007 letter to your shareholders, the response to Midwest's claims was quick from the communities that we serve. Within a day of the publication of the shareholder letter, the Akron-Canton Airport issued an unsolicited press release that started out with the words "On behalf of the 1.2 million travelers in the Akron-Canton area, the Akron-Canton Airport respectfully disagrees with the allegations about AirTran Airways made by the Midwest Air Group." The letter goes on to address what we did to grow air service in their community, lower fares, stimulate new traffic and actively participate in the business, community and charitable organizations in that area. There is a long list of our communities from Flint to Newport News to Moline, Indianapolis, Richmond, Baltimore/Washington and others that followed Akron-Canton with similar public letters of support. When evaluating claims by your management about the deficiencies in AirTran's service record, keep in mind the remarkable outpouring of support by numerous public bodies that took the time to set the record straight and to publicly disagree.

In exercising your permissive authority to consider the effects of a transaction on your customers, employees and the communities that Midwest serves, I would also remind you of the comments by a respected airline analyst from Prudential Securities, Robert McAdoo, that we mentioned in our February 19, 2007, letter to you. He noted in detail that the merger of the two airlines would materially improve service for Milwaukee business travelers by adding new destinations in the west and northwest; provide travelers from small communities presently served by Midwest with connecting opportunities to far more cities than are presently available to them; and, offer low-cost/low-fare service to a wider range of customers who are now traveling to the Chicago area airports to find affordable service to their desired destinations. His independent comments comprehensively address the criteria that underlie the non-shareholder constituency concerns that are identified in your Articles of Incorporation, the WBCL and in your own Form SC14D9.

Midwest's customers will also benefit from the quality of service offered by AirTran. Within the last week, the well respected joint University of Nebraska/Wichita State University Airline Quality Rating Report for the third year in a row ranked AirTran among the top three U.S. airlines in overall quality. We have the youngest all-Boeing fleet in the nation with a two class service offering free XM Satellite Radio. Unlike Midwest, our model introduces Business Class service in all jet markets. We recognize the value of Midwest's service product and would expect to include elements of it in our product.

We respect what your Chairman & CEO has accomplished over the last twenty-five years in creating a safe, well-regarded airline. As I have said from the time of our first discussions now almost two years ago, we believe that we can take the best of each of our airlines and create a unique national low-fare carrier.

We can bring to the communities that you presently serve easy access to a nationwide network of destinations that on its own is beyond Midwest's reach. AirTran this year will have the lowest non-fuel unit costs in the industry and as soon as next year we believe that we may be the all-in cost leader as well. With this cost structure we will be able to offer your customers lower fares and greater service than anything that Midwest can provide on its own -- exactly what we have done in Atlanta. These are measurable economic effects not open to real dispute. We have consistently delivered low cost and quality service by any metric.

We expect to be fully engaged in the communities that Midwest presently serves and to play an active role in charitable and civic affairs. While we are headquartered in Orlando, we are deeply involved in community affairs in Atlanta to a degree that Mayor Franklin calls "inspiring". Outside of Atlanta our role is as strong. Akron-Canton Airport in its press release disagreeing with comments made by Midwest specifically notes that AirTran is active in business, charitable and community affairs as we are in all the communities that we serve. Once again, you need not look just to our assurances but rather to what the communities that we serve have said about us publicly. Any consideration of this "social" effect as one element under your Articles of Incorporation cannot ignore what AirTran actually does in the many communities that we serve -- these are facts, not subjective judgments.

For your employees, the combined airline offers greater job security in the future and expanded opportunities for promotions and career development. Under the best of circumstances Midwest's long term prospects are dubious given the way in which the industry is evolving and your employees' interests should be considered. When we look at pay, it is clear that many of your employees would benefit from AirTran's higher pay rates. For your pilots, the combined carrier opens the way to captain upgrades sooner and with a greater number of opportunities. In fact, all employees will enjoy enhanced career opportunities flowing from the larger combined company -- a measurable economic effect.

Your vendors will obviously benefit from an expanded level of operations at Milwaukee and throughout the existing Midwest network. Airports and taxing authorities will also realize increased revenue by virtue of the size of the combined airline -- a measurable economic effect.

Your shareholders who have invested their money to become owners of Midwest will clearly benefit from our $15.00 offer and the equity that they will retain in a profitable, low cost, quality national airline.

In our view, the proper exercise of your fiduciary obligations directs you to begin the process of completing this transaction. By any measure all of the affected constituencies realize value in the combination of our two great companies and our track record demonstrates our ability to perform on our commitments.

For all of these reasons I believe that the time has come for us to set aside rhetoric and begin the work of creating a great airline that can be an integral part of the evolution of our industry. Let us work together and begin the process of creating jobs and economic development which will benefit all of our shareholders, employees, customers, suppliers and the communities that we serve. Let the WBCL and your Articles of Incorporation become a reminder of what we can do for all interested constituencies and not a subject of dispute for the courts to decide.

Yours truly,

Joseph B. Leonard



You don't need a passport to know what state you're in...
User currently offlineJetpixx From United States of America, joined Jul 2004, 867 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 2342 times:

I am a shareholder in MEH...do you think I'll receive any sort of contact from either company, or am I too small of a fish. I hold about 100 shares. Probably just a small fish, eh?

I am just curious to see what will happen. I like both airlines and their product, but hope to see them remain separate entities.


User currently offlineMainland From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 309 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 2319 times:

Quoting Jetpixx (Reply 3):
I am a shareholder in MEH...do you think I'll receive any sort of contact from either company, or am I too small of a fish. I hold about 100 shares. Probably just a small fish, eh?

You're not too small of a fish. It all depends on when you purchased the shares, not how many you own. Depending on when you bought the shares you should definately be receiving a proxy & information on Midwest's annual meeting in the coming weeks. You should also receive a proxy (of different color) from AirTran for their Board of Director nominees -- as well as, possibly, further information on the tender offer or how to tender your shares.



You don't need a passport to know what state you're in...
User currently offlineDeltaDAWG From United States of America, joined May 2006, 776 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 2301 times:

I hold shares in both companies, appx. 460 with YX and appx. 835 of FL. $15 per share seems fair and for those that bought their YX shares back in '04-'05 $15 per share represents a fairly substantial return on their investment. I personally am for the merger both from a monetary view as well as what the future airline could be. FL has done nothing but grow organically and yes, they have dropped out of markets when it was unprofitable. But overall, FL has provided sound service to both large and small communities and just do not see the armageddon in MKE that so many believe will happen should this deal go through. FL has continuously moved forward and progressed over the past 6-7 years. I saw recently where they ranked #3 for lost luggage, yet another step forward.

In the end YX shareholders need to listen to each side and make their minds up. To me, expansion with someone else's CRJ's is not organic growth but a stop gap measure. The YX BOD needs to propose a new plan. One with a real answer for replacing older equipment and what do they intend to do about new a/c since they cannot get anymore 717's? Two, what truly is an expansion plan with the CRJ's out of the picture - could YX move into new markets with a/c besides the CRJ's? Well, they cannot really until they answer the first question. Giving expansion to regionals is giving up organic growth job opportunities in MKE & MCI, is it not?

Now to the all important question that will determine if the whole deal is made or not - Cookies on the a/c. No, FL does not have ovens on the a/c so yes if they serve cookies I am sure it will be pre-packaged and not as good as the pre-made frozen "baked on board" sensationally fabulous, make or break deal cookies that YX serves. Also, it could mean that someones wife would have to find a real job instead of mixing up cookie batter.

Getting a hold of the YX shareholder list will give FL to make their pitch personally to some of the large investors and hopefully sway enough of the larger investors to tender the shares. We shall see.



GO Dawgs, Sic' em, woof woof woof
User currently offlineQuickmover From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2494 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2264 times:

Quoting Cubsrule (Thread starter):
YX now has some time to send whatever propaganda it wants to

One thing I have noticed after the most recent bid increase is a lack of propaganda from MEH. After the first couple of offers, the MEH spin machine was in high gear. We have heard very little this time around. Maybe it's still coming, but aside from Tim's comment about the FL hiring ads, nothing.

My guess is they are finally talking behind the scenes and trying to work something out. Perhaps enough institutions are saying this deal can't be ignored any more.


User currently offlineKnope2001 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 2947 posts, RR: 30
Reply 7, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2250 times:

Quoting Quickmover (Reply 6):
One thing I have noticed after the most recent bid increase is a lack of propaganda from MEH. After the first couple of offers, the MEH spin machine was in high gear. We have heard very little this time around. Maybe it's still coming, but aside from Tim's comment about the FL hiring ads, nothing.

In yesterday's Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel they had 1/2 page four-color ads on three consecutive pages (top to bottom on the right half of pages 5, 7 and 9), each with a title something like "What have we done for you lately". The first talked about the three added nonstop cities, the second about several markets with flight increases and the third about several markets with aircraft upgrades. I suspect they know a lot of their shares are held locally and they want to make sure locals know of their service increases.


User currently offlineTVNWZ From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 2398 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2237 times:

Quoting Jetpixx (Reply 3):
I am a shareholder in MEH...do you think I'll receive any sort of contact from either company, or am I too small of a fish. I hold about 100 shares. Probably just a small fish, eh?
I am just curious to see what will happen. I like both airlines and their product, but hope to see them remain separate entities.

Call, or e-mail them your information and see what they send. One name off their list. Report back what they send you.

Quoting DeltaDAWG (Reply 5):
Getting a hold of the YX shareholder list will give FL to make their pitch personally to some of the large investors and hopefully sway enough of the larger investors to tender the shares. We shall see.



Quoting Quickmover (Reply 6):
One thing I have noticed after the most recent bid increase is a lack of propaganda from MEH. After the first couple of offers, the MEH spin machine was in high gear. We have heard very little this time around. Maybe it's still coming, but aside from Tim's comment about the FL hiring ads, nothing.

My guess is they are finally talking behind the scenes and trying to work something out. Perhaps enough institutions are saying this deal can't be ignored any more.

They have been very active locally. The MKE Business Journal has two big articles...not available online for some reason. One article quotes analysts for and against the merger. but, the big article is an interview with Hoeksema who takes a couple of swipes at AirTran. the biggest swipe was calling AirTran desperate to place all those airplanes someplace and have decided to target Midwest because they thought the airline would be an easy target. If they don't find a place for the planes, they are othe ones in trouble as evidence by their sliding stock price and loss of investor confidence that represents. He also compared the Midwest Airlines Culture to Southwest--hardworking, friendly etc. It was a pretty good interview. Too bad it is not online.

Behind the scenes, I know MHI has been very active with the institutional investors, making sure support is not eroding. And it appears it is not.

Again, AirTran knows who they have to convince to make the deal work. If they don't, they need to fire their financial institutions.


User currently offlineDeltaDAWG From United States of America, joined May 2006, 776 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2237 times:

Quoting Knope2001 (Reply 7):
The first talked about the three added nonstop cities, the second about several markets with flight increases and the third about several markets with aircraft upgrades. I suspect they know a lot of their shares are held locally and they want to make sure locals know of their service increases.

But what about the cancelled cities - Houston, DC, etc.? What about the markets that have taken a reduction in service? What about the job growth from adding new a/c - oh, wait SkyWest is being used, not actual YX a/c - no real job growth! More talk.



GO Dawgs, Sic' em, woof woof woof
User currently offlineQuickmover From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 2494 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 2234 times:

Quoting Knope2001 (Reply 7):
In yesterday's Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel they had 1/2 page four-color ads on three consecutive pages (top to bottom on the right half of pages 5, 7 and 9), each with a title something like "What have we done for you lately". The first talked about the three added nonstop cities, the second about several markets with flight increases and the third about several markets with aircraft upgrades. I suspect they know a lot of their shares are held locally and they want to make sure locals know of their service increases.

Well, I guess it starts again.

I will say this though. If MEH turns down the deal and succeeds with their plan, all will be ok. If MEH turns down the deal, and for whatever reason fails and the stock goes back to the $5-7 range, the class action lawyers will come out of the woodwork. These lawyers will not be interested in any excuses why A, B, or C didn't happen. They will only be interested in signing up as many disgruntled shareholders as they can so they can have their 30-40% cut of any settlement.

I keep reading about how these "local people" only care about saving the airline, but money is money . I would suspect that many attitudes about cookies could change with a big drop in the share price.


User currently offlineSideflare75 From United States of America, joined May 2005, 613 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 2217 times:

Quoting Quickmover (Reply 6):
One thing I have noticed after the most recent bid increase is a lack of propaganda from MEH. After the first couple of offers, the MEH spin machine was in high gear. We have heard very little this time around. Maybe it's still coming, but aside from Tim's comment about the FL hiring ads, nothing.

Remember also that the MEH board has yet to make it's recomendation to the shareholders. I don't think the company can say much right now until that takes place. It is due by this Friday the 13th.


User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 23148 posts, RR: 20
Reply 12, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 2147 times:

Quoting DeltaDAWG (Reply 9):

But what about the cancelled cities - Houston, DC, etc.? What about the markets that have taken a reduction in service?

That's one thing I think is disingenuous, because FL has closed cities (GSO) and cut routes too. It's just an example of spin like (unfortunately) a lot of what we are hearing from both carriers with respect to this merger.

FL is (still) yet to articulate a workable plan, and it seems like in many ways, YX has run out of defenses. Perhaps that explains the lack of propaganda that Quickmover mentioned. I don't know.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineN917ME From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 730 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (7 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2120 times:

Quoting Cubsrule (Reply 12):
FL is (still) yet to articulate a workable plan, and it seems like in many ways, YX has run out of defenses. Perhaps that explains the lack of propaganda that Quickmover mentioned. I don't know.

Actually MEH can not comment to much until the a recommendation is made to the shareholders. After that its game on.


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