Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Air Asia Confirms It Will Buy At Least 15 A330-300  
User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 7385 times:

http://www.finanznachrichten.de/nach...ichten-2007-05/artikel-8231566.asp

In April, the company signed an order with Airbus for up to 10 of the aircraft, with an option to buy five more.

'By end of June, we will firm the order for an additional five A330-300s. Negotiations are going on now,' Fernandes said.


Until the end of the year they'll know whether to buy another 10.

Flights will start with three leased planes in September to China and Australia.

Deliveries of own planes will start Q4 of 2008.

[Edited 2007-05-13 12:24:54]

22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMoo From Falkland Islands, joined May 2007, 3884 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 7315 times:

Quoting Thorben (Thread starter):
In April, the company signed an order with Airbus for up to 10 of the aircraft, with an option to buy five more.

Thats interesting, they don't show on the Airbus order sheet for April....

Good news though, the A330 really seems to be selling recently!


User currently offlineQantasA333 From Australia, joined Jan 2007, 538 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 7244 times:

Quoting Thorben (Thread starter):
Flights will start with three leased planes in September to China and Australia.

Where to in China and Australia?


User currently offlineNimish From India, joined Feb 2005, 3213 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 7006 times:

Good - some low cost long haul competition in the region! Will definitely help growing the tourist market/economy in the region.


Latest Trip Report - GoAir BLR-BOM-BLR
User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 6978 times:

Quoting Moo (Reply 1):
Thats interesting, they don't show on the Airbus order sheet for April....

I noticed that, too. Probably not 100% firmed up, maybe they just signed an MoU or LoI or something.

Quoting QantasA333 (Reply 2):
Where to in China and Australia?

The article doesn't say that.


User currently offlineKL911 From Ireland, joined Jul 2003, 5120 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 6886 times:

http://www.answers.com/topic/airasia-x


AirAsia X is a new longhaul budget airline that will begin operations in July 2007. The new carrier is owned by FlyAsianXpress (FAX), a small airline serving rural routes in East Malaysia which franchises the brand name of AirAsia, Asia's largest low cost carrier. AirAsia X will use the parent company AirAsia's ticketing website, livery, uniforms, and management style.[1]

The first three destinations are expected to be Hangzhou and Tianjin in China; and London or Manchester in the UK. Other potential destinations are Amritsar in India, Sharjah in the UAE, Melbourne in Australia and Osaka in Japan. It is reported that the Malaysian government has given AirAsia X rights to 36 international destinations[2].


KL911



Next trip : DUB-AUH-CGK-DPS-KUL-AUH-CDG-ORK :-)
User currently offlineXA744 From Mexico, joined Mar 2004, 734 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 6368 times:

I don´t know, when I first visited Malaysia, some 15 year ago, MAS was pretty much the only option to travel to and from, and around this country. Now, just take a look at how fast Malaysia´s aviation has been developing. I know all this is going on par with the country´s tremendous growth and competitiveness, but, is there really a market that can support such an astonishing start up of carriers and increase in capacity ?

Anyways, it is wonderful to see all this fantastic developments in Malaysian aviation taking place.

Best regards

[Edited 2007-05-13 23:51:02]


No matter how you fly...just never get your wings clipped !
User currently offlineJfr From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 227 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 4970 times:

Quoting XA744 (Reply 6):
I don´t know, when I first visited Malaysia, some 15 year ago, MAS was pretty much the only option to travel to and from, and around this country. Now, just take a look at how fast Malaysia´s aviation has been developing. I know all this is going on par with the country´s tremendous growth and competitiveness, but, is there really a market that can support such an astonishing start up of carriers and increase in capacity ?

The Malaysian aviation market has suffered significant poaching from SQ over the years; because - in the past - MAS has been such a lethargic competitor. Where SQ, for instance, serves LAX thrice daily, MH has only recently started offering a 7 day per week service, with the same routings and timings every day of the week. SQ also serves SFO, JFK, EWR (MH too) and YVR. In total, SQ has eight flights per day to North America vs. 2 at MAS.

Now that Air Asia has entered the scene, and MH has better management, more flyers are traveling direct on Malaysia-based airlines. Plus the AK services are bringing significant hubbing passengers through KUL for the first time.

Can Malaysia support these traffic levels? Without a doubt. I have a feeling that this is a trend which should continue for years to come, as KUL recaptures the business which SIN and BKK have been winning in past years.


User currently offlineAlangirvan From New Zealand, joined Nov 2000, 2106 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 4683 times:

The first three destinations are expected to be Hangzhou and Tianjin in China; and London or Manchester in the UK. Other potential destinations are Amritsar in India, Sharjah in the UAE, Melbourne in Australia and Osaka in Japan. It is reported that the Malaysian government has given AirAsia X rights to 36 international destinations[2].
[/quote]


Why would they need A330-300s to fly to Hangzhou and Tianjin? Great Circle Mapper shows that KL to Hangzhou is 2253 miles and Tianjin is 2690 miles. Air Asia must think that these will be very big routes if they need a wide body. The distance is suitable for A320s.


User currently offlineZKNBX From New Zealand, joined Jul 2006, 464 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 4588 times:

Hang on a minute... A320 and A330... not really a logical comparison. They are using A330s because they believe there is market demand to fill the jet. They wouldn' t order them if they didn't think they could fill em.

However, i don't see how they can be competitive in the Malaysia - London market, with an A330 compared to BA and MH nonstop service, and one-stop service on several premium service carriers of note. This may be one area where they are out of step.


User currently offlineKappel From Suriname, joined Jul 2005, 3533 posts, RR: 17
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 3 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 4484 times:

Quoting ZKNBX (Reply 9):
However, i don't see how they can be competitive in the Malaysia - London market, with an A330 compared to BA and MH nonstop service, and one-stop service on several premium service carriers of note. This may be one area where they are out of step.

IMHO this depends on the prices they will offer, if they are lower than BA or MH I can imagine a lot of people won't mind the fuel stop. I know I wouldn't, if the service and seats are ok that is...

Anybody know how many seats they will stuff in the a330's and what they will offer for IFE (if any at all), and do you have to pay for drinks and food?



L1011,733,734,73G,738,743,744,752,763,772,77W,DC855,DC863,DC930,DC950,MD11,MD88,306,319,320,321,343,346,ARJ85,CR7,E195
User currently offlineMAS777 From United Kingdom, joined Jul 1999, 2935 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 3960 times:

Quoting Jfr (Reply 7):
Where SQ, for instance, serves LAX thrice daily, MH has only recently started offering a 7 day per week service, with the same routings and timings every day of the week. SQ also serves SFO, JFK, EWR (MH too) and YVR. In total, SQ has eight flights per day to North America vs. 2 at MAS

With the North American market - don't forget that SQ has been flying to the USA since the early70s whilst MAS only obtained traffic rights to fly to LAX in 1985 - and even then - the access was very restricted.

As you mentioned SQ had previously taken almost all of the International traffic rights when MSA split (into MAS and SIA - hence the 'I' in SIA) - so it is difficult to compare the two carriers on many accounts but it does show how FAR MAS has come since starting up with a handful of F27s and 737s.

Quoting ZKNBX (Reply 9):
compared to BA

BA has not flown to KUL for years...


User currently offlineAsiaflyer From Singapore, joined May 2007, 1129 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 3940 times:

Remeber that Malaysia still is a fairly poor country, eventhough they are making great progress at moment. Alot of people has never afforded an airline ticket and will never do either. With the new LCC like Air Asia, Tiger airways, Cebu Pacific, etc there is a new world opening up for alot of people. To get the chance to go to China or Europe for a affordable price was just impopssible some years ago.
As I expect alot of Air Asia X passengers to origin from Malaysia or the surronding countries, I dont really think that an extra fuelstop in M/E on the way to europe matters that much. Ticket price is much more important.

If I was in management for MH, I would be abit concerned. What the bleeding MH does not need at moment is more competition, especially not from a LCC long haul carrier.



SQ,MI,MH,CX,KA,CA,CZ,MU,KE,OZ,QF,NZ,FD,JQ,3K,5J,IT,AI,IC,QR,SK,LF,KL,AF,LH,LX,OS,SR,BA,SN,FR,WF,1I,5T,VZ,VX,AC,NW,UA,US,
User currently offline9MMAR From Malaysia, joined Jul 2006, 2109 posts, RR: 18
Reply 13, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3883 times:

Quoting MAS777 (Reply 11):
MAS has come since starting up with a handful of F27s and 737s.

Actually, when MSA splitted up, SIA took all the Boeing fleets, leaving MAS with only those F27s.

MSA ceased operations in 1972, with its assets split between two new airlines; Malaysia Airlines and Singapore Airlines.

With Singapore Airlines determined to develop its international routes, it took the entire fleet of seven Boeing 707s and five Boeing 737s which would allow it to continue servicing the regional and long-haul international routes. Since most of MSA's international routes were flown out of Singapore, the vast majority of international routes were in the hands of Singapore Airlines. In addition, MSA's headquarters, which was located in Singapore, became the headquarters of Singapore Airlines.

Malaysia Airlines, on the other hand, took all domestic routes within Malaysia and international routes out of the country, as well as the remaining fleet of Fokker F27s. It began flights on 1 October 1972.

Quoting MAS777 (Reply 11):
BA has not flown to KUL for years...

I was so surprised that a lot of A.Netters in this thread still think that BA flies to KUL. BA doesn't even code share with MH on MH's KUL-LHR flights.

Quoting Asiaflyer (Reply 12):
Remeber that Malaysia still is a fairly poor country,

Again, and again, Malaysia is not a poor country. An exceprt from the CIA World Fact Book:

"Malaysia, a middle-income country, transformed itself from 1971 through the late 1990s from a producer of raw materials into an emerging multi-sector economy."

GDP stands at $12,700 in 2006 and ranked 59th in the world. I can accept if you say that Malaysia is a fairly poor country during the 70s not in 2007.

Quoting Asiaflyer (Reply 12):
As I expect alot of Air Asia X

Some of us just posted a reply without even checking their (basic) facts, the name is AirAsia Long Haul. No more 'X'.

Quoting Asiaflyer (Reply 12):
What the bleeding MH

And again, please check MH's financial status. 2 consecutive quarters of net profit and a very narrow loss for FY2006. MH is no more bleeding. 1Q2007 financial result (which is a sure fire net profit) will be announced in just about anytime.  irked 


User currently offline9MMAR From Malaysia, joined Jul 2006, 2109 posts, RR: 18
Reply 14, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 3879 times:

This thread is actually full of superseeded facts about AirAsia Long Haul. From the name, to the airline's destinations, to the starting date of operation, all are a no more valid information. There has been a lot of threads discussing this topic, so please.  no 

User currently offlineAsiaflyer From Singapore, joined May 2007, 1129 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3827 times:

Quoting 9MMAR (Reply 13):
Again, and again, Malaysia is not a poor country. An exceprt from the CIA World Fact Book:

"Malaysia, a middle-income country, transformed itself from 1971 through the late 1990s from a producer of raw materials into an emerging multi-sector economy."

GDP stands at $12,700 in 2006 and ranked 59th in the world. I can accept if you say that Malaysia is a fairly poor country during the 70s not in 2007.

I am sorry my dear friend if you got offended. I didnt mean to say anything negative about Malaysia. I love Malaysia and Malaysians.
I am trying to say how positive it is that Malaysian people get access to a long haul LCC.
But I still dont think that MH are very happy about the increased competition, just as they start to get their stuff together after their cost cutting programs.



SQ,MI,MH,CX,KA,CA,CZ,MU,KE,OZ,QF,NZ,FD,JQ,3K,5J,IT,AI,IC,QR,SK,LF,KL,AF,LH,LX,OS,SR,BA,SN,FR,WF,1I,5T,VZ,VX,AC,NW,UA,US,
User currently offlineOceansWorld From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 16, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 3595 times:

Quoting Alangirvan (Reply 8):
Why would they need A330-300s to fly to Hangzhou and Tianjin? Great Circle Mapper shows that KL to Hangzhou is 2253 miles and Tianjin is 2690 miles. Air Asia must think that these will be very big routes if they need a wide body. The distance is suitable for A320s.

In another thread, I used the data from GCM for the OOL-HKG route, which said it is 3790nm long. Zeke corrected me by saying that the designated airway is more like 4042nm. So I wonder how much can we rely on Great Circle Mapper data.

Quoting 9MMAR (Reply 13):
Actually, when MSA split up, SIA took all the Boeing fleets, leaving MAS with only those F27s.

Actually, when MSA did split up, SIA took all the B737-112s leaving two B737-212s with MH. But that wasn't a big problem for Malaysia as the airline got seven brand new B737-2H6 between July and October 1972 while the split up was official as of September 30th that same year.


User currently offlineKaran69 From India, joined Oct 2004, 2885 posts, RR: 18
Reply 17, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3536 times:

Quoting Asiaflyer (Reply 15):
But I still dont think that MH are very happy about the increased competition, just as they start to get their stuff together after their cost cutting programs.

No one is happy about competition, but in MHs case they do whatever they can even if it meant denying two Indian carriers Air Sahara and AIX from overflight operations, which they thought would dilute the market

Karan


User currently offlineAirbazar From United States of America, joined Sep 2003, 8241 posts, RR: 10
Reply 18, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3488 times:

Quoting Alangirvan (Reply 8):
Why would they need A330-300s to fly to Hangzhou and Tianjin? Great Circle Mapper shows that KL to Hangzhou is 2253 miles and Tianjin is 2690 miles. Air Asia must think that these will be very big routes if they need a wide body. The distance is suitable for A320s.

Distance has nothing to do with it. Within Asia it's not unusual to see widebodies on such relatively short sectors. I've seen SQ operate 744's between SIN and KUL, a mere 300mi route  Smile


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 8883 posts, RR: 75
Reply 19, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3450 times:

Quoting OceansWorld (Reply 16):
In another thread, I used the data from GCM for the OOL-HKG route, which said it is 3790nm long. Zeke corrected me by saying that the designated airway is more like 4042nm. So I wonder how much can we rely on Great Circle Mapper data.

Generally the distance alone the airways is only about 5-10% more than the great circle track, however in this case flying from KUL-TSN you would need to take up a bit of a dogleg, north through Thailand then across China, going direct over Hong Kong is not allowed.

KUL-TSN direct 2338 nm, via airways 2543 nm
KUL-HGH direct 1958 nm, via airways 2101 nm

That is still without the arrivals and departures built in, anything over 2000 nm is starting to get a bit long for a 320, widebodies start making it cheaper to operate as the fuel payload in the 320 starts getting to fairly high ratio compared to the passenger (money generating) payload.

I have plotted both the direct great circle route, and the route via airways in GCM for you to compare.



http://gc.kls2.com/cgi-bin/gc?PATH=2...&MAP-CENTER=22d18m32sN+113d54m53sE



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineOceansWorld From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3410 times:

Quoting Zeke (Reply 19):
I have plotted both the direct great circle route, and the route via airways in GCM for you to compare.

Thanks for that. Very interesting.

Quoting Zeke (Reply 19):
going direct over Hong Kong is not allowed.

Why is that ?


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 8883 posts, RR: 75
Reply 21, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3402 times:

Quoting OceansWorld (Reply 20):
Why is that ?

Just the way the airspace is setup over the pearl river delta, they don't like to have over flights, just inbound/outbound flights.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineAlangirvan From New Zealand, joined Nov 2000, 2106 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (7 years 2 months 2 weeks 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 3242 times:

It is starting to look as though Air Asia to Australia will happen after all, and it looks as though it will happen sooner rather than later. Once again, this article says that Avalon is the preferred airport. I think this is because the Malaysian Government does not want AirAsia to fly to an airport already served by Malaysia Airlines. Apparently Adelaide is OK. This is Malaysian policy. If Avalon is not available as soon as Air Asia wants, will they give up on Melbourne, or will the Malaysian Government allow them to serve Tullamarine? If Avalon does become an international gateway, then it would be available for flights to NZ as well. Other airlines who might serve Avalon once it is available might include Viva Macau, Oasis Hong Kong, Freedom. In addition to AirAsia Malaysia, there are branches in Thailand and Indonesia. Although it seems the A330s are intended for the Malaysian part, there is no reason why the other two parts should not consider flights to Australia eventually.


Alan Girvan





Air Asia eyeing Adelaide, Melbourne

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

SMH May 17, 2007 - 5:59PM
Asia's biggest low cost airline - Air Asia - is eyeing Adelaide and Melbourne as new destinations for its new medium to long haul carrier.
Air Asia X will announce its entry point into Australia in July.
An offshoot of the highly successful, no frills, high frequency Air Asia brand - it will begin flights between Australia and Malaysia in September, Chief Executive Officer Tony Fernandes said on Thursday.
"My two favourite routes are Adelaide and (Avalon) Melbourne," Fernandes said.
"Maybe we will go to both.
"I would love to repay their faith in us, especially South Australia."
The new carrier will fly from Malaysia to Australia, Japan, Korea, China, Europe and the Middle East.
"Our philosophy is to get the fare as low as possible," he said at his airline base in Setang Airport.
"We are not appealing to the corporate market, we are appealing to the market that has never flown."
The company, due to announce its new chief executive next week, has ordered 15 new Airbus A330 aircraft which are due to be on line from September next year.
"There's no turning back," he said.
"We have launched that (Air Asia X), we have got staff, we have got one plane, 15 planes (on order), we are actively looking for routes."
Fernandes expected return flights between Australia and Malaysia would cost around 800-900 Malaysian Ringgit (A$285-320) return, with two flights daily.
He said his preferred first flight for the new carrier would be to Australia.
"If we get the pricing right there is no reason why we can't do two (flights) a day from KL (Kuala Lumpur)."
Australia's low cost carriers were "kidding themselves" with their fares saying they were "not really low cost," he said.
Since its launch in 2001, Air Asia has flown more than 20 million passengers around the region for prices as low as US 99 cents.
"We want to be the lowest cost product," he said.
"I don't see the fares being particularly low (in Australia).
"I would imaging that to Australia we will be doing an airfare of 800-900 ringgit return."
He explains that the Air Asia X medium to long haul flights would be a "different experience," with only limited seating allocations and passengers likely to pay for food and baggage requirements.
Fernandes said the South Australian government had approached the company about its plans to fly to Australia, which he expected would open the country up to 600 million South-East Asians for travel.
"Over 600 million South-East Asian people will be flying ... to KL then catch X to Australia," he said.
"They will fly from Cambodia, they will fly from Vietnam."
He ruled out Sydney Airport as a potential destination.
"I think Kingsford Smith is an expensive airport... I'd look at Newcastle before I go to Sydney."
Battling the effects of the tsunami, skyrocketing fuel prices and terrorism, Fernandes has turned the company into a 4.5 billion ringgit ($A1.6 billion) success, after buying a debt-laden Air Asia five years ago for just 36 Australian cents.
The former music industry businessman bought the airline three days before the September 11 terrorist attack in the US.
"It was a great introduction because from that day there has been nothing but strife," Fernandes said


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Air Asia Xpress Has Chosen The A330-200 posted Mon Apr 2 2007 12:22:24 by FCKC
First A330-300 For Air Madrid posted Sat Oct 1 2005 01:28:31 by AlitaliaMD11
Air China With A330-300 On Order? posted Fri Sep 30 2005 11:13:56 by JetMaster
Air Caraïbes A330-300 Order? posted Fri Jun 17 2005 18:57:47 by A388
Korean Air A330-300 To Prague – Restrictions? posted Fri Mar 18 2005 16:57:39 by Udo
Air Transat A330-300 Down To Port Of Spain posted Thu Apr 10 2003 19:23:53 by BWIA330
1ts Pics Of Air Luxor A330-300 CS-TMT posted Sun Dec 22 2002 18:18:04 by Alpha
Lufthansa Confirms Order For 10 Airbus A330-300 posted Wed Jul 31 2002 11:48:22 by Vfw614
Air France To Buy 10 A330-300 posted Sun Oct 29 2000 13:26:36 by L'espace18
A330-300 For Iran Air posted Fri Sep 15 2000 18:53:33 by Airmale