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Why Is The 777-300ER Called The 77W?  
User currently offlineCba From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 4531 posts, RR: 3
Posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24152 times:

Does anybody know what the W is supposed to stand for? I find it odd because both the 762ER and 763ER are coded as 762 and 763 respectively. Same with the 772 and 772ER, so why the change in this standardization with the 773?

34 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24140 times:

The 77L and 77W are physically different than their precesessors, unlike the 762 and 763. They're about 14 feet wider, if I'm not mistaken, so classifying them differently could be valuable to ground controllers as well as the company employees on the ground.

NS


User currently offlineIADCA From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 1373 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24134 times:

I believe it's for the Boeing-given "Worldliner" nickname. Is that right?

User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24121 times:

The worldliner is the 777-200LR, which is abbreviated 77L.

NS


User currently offlineIADCA From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 1373 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24063 times:

Quoting Gigneil (Reply 3):

That's what I thought...but it seemed too logical to pass up...


User currently offlineCba From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 4531 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24063 times:

Quoting Gigneil (Reply 1):
The 77L and 77W are physically different than their precesessors, unlike the 762 and 763. They're about 14 feet wider, if I'm not mistaken,

14 feet wider? That can't be true, and the different 772 and 773 models have the same respective lengths. The only difference I could find is that the longer range 777's (77L and 77W) have a slightly larger wingspan (60.9 vs. 64.8 meters).

Would the difference in wingspan be enough to have the plane classified as a different code?


User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31412 posts, RR: 85
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 24053 times:
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Quoting Cba (Reply 5):
Would the difference in wingspan be enough to have the plane classified as a different code?

Yes, as it can affect ground ops. So the (almost) 14 foot wider wingspan of the 772LR and 773ER would mean they might not be able to as easily squeeze through an opening compared to the 772, 772ER or 773. So it would be helpful for Ground and the Tower to know they're dealing with a wider (via wingspan) plane.


User currently offlineGigneil From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 16347 posts, RR: 85
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 23790 times:

13ish feet, sorry.  Smile

NS

[Edited 2007-05-13 23:57:14]

User currently offlinePHKLM From Northern Mariana Islands, joined Dec 2005, 1198 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 23701 times:

777 - Boeing 777-all pax series
772 - Boeing 777-200 or Boeing 777-200ER
77L - Boeing 777-200LR
773 - Boeing 777-300
77W - Boeing 777-300ER

I stand corrected...


User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4757 posts, RR: 25
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 22256 times:

So no one has answered the question... What does "W" and "L" stand for?


Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
User currently offlineJumboforever From Japan, joined Jul 2005, 200 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 22103 times:

The L stands for LONG range (from LF)
The W stands for the raked WINGTIPS of the 777-300ER

Regards,

JumboForever


User currently offlineCarpethead From Japan, joined Aug 2004, 2977 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 22019 times:

So most carriers seem to use '77W' for the 773ER but it seems NH doesn't abide by these rules and uses the generic code 777 for all of its int'l 777 ops.
On domestic schedules, '772' is used despite the fact that most flights are not 772ERs and 777-381s are '773.'


User currently offlineMilesDependent From Australia, joined Sep 2001, 862 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 21860 times:

Quoting Jumboforever (Reply 13):
The L stands for LONG range (from LF)
The W stands for the raked WINGTIPS of the 777-300ER

This makes sense - but is this you using logic or has this been publicly stated by Boeing somewhere?

mD


User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21582 posts, RR: 59
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 21748 times:

Quoting Cba (Reply 5):
Would the difference in wingspan be enough to have the plane classified as a different code?

Yes. The original 777s were "200 foot" planes, fitting in just a hair under 200 feet width.

The 777 longer range aircraft (77F, 77L, 77W) have the same wingspan (roughly) as the 744.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineOGGFBORefueler From United States of America, joined May 2007, 70 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 21670 times:

200 feet width or 200 feet length?

I'm guessing everyone is talking about wingspan and/or fuselage length.

Aloha!
Keone

[Edited 2007-05-14 06:22:20]


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User currently offlineRemcor From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 358 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 21264 times:

Along the same lines, where did 73G come from? This refers to the 737-500 and -400 right?

User currently offlineAJO From Netherlands, joined Jan 2005, 577 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 21206 times:

Quoting Remcor (Reply 19):
Along the same lines, where did 73G come from? This refers to the 737-500 and -400 right?

737-400 = 734
737-500 = 735
737-700 = 73G

They probably chose 73G for the -700, because "737" already means 737 - all series, and the G is the seventh letter of the alphabet. FYI, 737-800 = 738, and in the same logic as 73G, the wingletted 737-800 is known as 73H.



bla
User currently offlineTrijetsRMissed From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 2398 posts, RR: 7
Reply 17, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 21165 times:

Quoting OGGFBORefueler (Reply 18):
I'm guessing everyone is talking about wingspan and/or fuselage length.

The original 772's are:

length: 209 ft.
width (wingspan): 199 ft.



There's nothing quite like a trijet.
User currently offlineSA7700 From South Africa, joined Dec 2003, 3431 posts, RR: 26
Reply 18, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 5 days 1 hour ago) and read 21134 times:
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HEAD MODERATOR

Quoting Remcor (Reply 19):
Along the same lines, where did 73G come from? This refers to the 737-500 and -400 right?

73G = Boeing 737-700 pax
73H = Boeing 737-800 (winglets) pax
73W = Boeing 737-700 (winglets) pax
734 = Boeing 737-400 pax
735 = Boeing 737-500 pax

From: http://www.airlinecodes.co.uk/arctypes.asp


Rgds

SA7700



When you are doing stuff that nobody has done before, there is no manual – Kevin McCloud (Grand Designs)
User currently offline777law From Monaco, joined Jul 2006, 203 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 20353 times:

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 13):
The original 777s were "200 foot" planes, fitting in just a hair under 200 feet width.

As I understand it, though, the "200" in 777-200 does not refer to the width / wingspan of the aircraft, it refers to the passenger capacity. Thus, 772's (ER & LR ) can carry 200+ passengers while 773's and 77W's can carry 300+ passengers.

That is where the numbering designation originates, correct?



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User currently offlineOroka From Canada, joined Dec 2006, 913 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 19671 times:

Quoting 777law (Reply 19):
That is where the numbering designation originates, correct?

Dont think so. Following that logic, the 747-8 can only carry 8 passengers and the 747-100 can carry 100 passengers?

-100, -200, -300, -400 is simply a way to differentiate between models. When there are varying versions of specific models (like 777-200, 200ER, 200LR) they user letters (ie 77L). Most airline configuration gets even more specific, for example some of Qantas's 747s are 747-438. For handling purposes it will be refereed to as a 744, but internally it is a 747-438.

[Edited 2007-05-14 12:15:14]

User currently onlineMEA-707 From Netherlands, joined Nov 1999, 4358 posts, RR: 35
Reply 21, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 19625 times:

Quoting 777law (Reply 19):
That is where the numbering designation originates, correct?

Adding to Oraka's explanation, after the 747, Boeing skipped the -100 series as these were seen as the less efficient versions with toothing problems. Now it's all messed up even more, that both Airbus and Boeing start their newest models A350, A-380 and 787 with -8 or -800 versions instead as 8 seems a lucky number.



nobody has ever died from hard work, but why take the risk?
User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 20 hours ago) and read 19583 times:

Quoting MilesDependent (Reply 12):
This makes sense - but is this you using logic or has this been publicly stated by Boeing somewhere?

Boeing doesn't determine this. The determination is made by IATA who publish an annual "Coding Directory" that incorporates all of this and more.

The "W" and "L" in the 77W and 77L don't stand for anything particular. Similarly the "H" in 73H or numerous other examples. These were selected by a committee who probably used similar logic to what was mentioned here when coming up with them, but officially are just random selections.


User currently offline777law From Monaco, joined Jul 2006, 203 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 19 hours ago) and read 19067 times:

Quoting Oroka (Reply 20):
Dont think so. Following that logic, the 747-8 can only carry 8 passengers and the 747-100 can carry 100 passengers?

-100, -200, -300, -400 is simply a way to differentiate between models. When there are varying versions of specific models (like 777-200, 200ER, 200LR) they user letters (ie 77L). Most airline configuration gets even more specific, for example some of Qantas's 747s are 747-438. For handling purposes it will be refereed to as a 744, but internally it is a 747-438.



Quoting MEA-707 (Reply 21):
Adding to Oraka's explanation, after the 747, Boeing skipped the -100 series as these were seen as the less efficient versions with toothing problems. Now it's all messed up even more, that both Airbus and Boeing start their newest models A350, A-380 and 787 with -8 or -800 versions instead as 8 seems a lucky number.

I guess I should have better explained my point. . . I realize that my comments don't make sense when applied to the entire Boeing and Airbus fleets. But I was not saying that Boeing relied on passenger numbers when designating all aircraft like the 747-8 or 737-9 -- obviously the 739 doesn't carry 900+ passengers. My comments were limited only to 777 designations. I recall reading that Boeing decided to use aircraft capacity when designating the 772 and 773.



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User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31412 posts, RR: 85
Reply 24, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 18803 times:
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The -100 models for the 757, 767 and 777 were reserved for future shrinks of the "baseline" -200 configuration, but the economics never worked out so they never were formally developed. In the case of the 777, the 777-100 would have been a shrink designed for ULR missions and this role was taken by the 777-200LR.

[Edited 2007-05-14 14:19:21]

25 MilesDependent : Well there you go - that I did not know. Learn something knew every day. Thanks!
26 DeltaDC9 : I have been waiting WEEKS for a thread as informative as that single post.
27 YULWinterSkies : Well, in this precise case, it only means that it is a 744 initially delivered and configured for QF by Boeing. If QF gets a second-hand 744 from, le
28 ManchesterMAN : Yeh, but its lucky for all those airlines who got cheap A330s because of it!
29 ConcordeBoy : Uh, no. Has nothing to do with either of those. The "2" is used because the initial plans for a 777-100 were scrapped, and "00" is Boeing's productio
30 United787 : What is the 77F?
31 SA7700 : 777 freighter model Rgds SA7700
32 Post contains images Aircellist : Even if it was set by IATA... ... how about 77Large and 77Wide??? (keeping in mind that "wide" means "large" in french)
33 LY777 : I I read somewhere that the 777-200ER code was 77E
34 Clickhappy : Boeing does append a second letter (Wx) for use on their internal docs and flight numbers.
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