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Boeing Re- Commercial Question.  
User currently offlineMirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2728 times:
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So I have a pressing question. The last few nights I have been watching the National Geographic Channel. I've been seeing these commercials for the Boeing Company.

Now here is the thing. What are they advertising? I like both A and B, so that is not the issue. I just don't get it. I mean, truth be told, Boeing's only other MAJOR competition is Airbus. And its not like the CEO's of the airlines are going to be looking for commercials for advertising to help them tip their decision. And it's not as if Airbus is pumping out commercials toting their product as being better.

Those airlines are going to make their decisions of sales based on probably the airshows, right? And so if that is the case, who is the advertising aimed at? To what end? Stockholders? New Jobs?

What do you think?


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10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20375 posts, RR: 62
Reply 1, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2712 times:

Quoting Mirrodie (Thread starter):
who is the advertising aimed at?



Quoting http://www.buzzflash.com/interviews/03/01/03_Rhodes.html:

Ask yourself, why does ADM (Archer Daniels Midland) advertise? Do they want to sell you a soybean? Why does Boeing advertise? Are you gonna' buy aircraft? Aircraft parts? GE the largest defense contractor wants to sell you a light buld and/or a missile? And then there's BASF -- they don't make anything! They just make it better. Uh huh. They're buying CONTENT. Millions and millions of advertising dollars DO affect the message you get. It controls the news that is reported and the news that is NOT.



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User currently offlineMirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 2, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2670 times:
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Feel free to add your own opinion and not just cut and paste the ramblings of someone else's opinions.

So to reinterate, who do you think the advertising is aimed at? And to what end since the audience is probably not likely to buy.



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User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20375 posts, RR: 62
Reply 3, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2633 times:

Quoting Mirrodie (Reply 2):
Feel free to add your own opinion and not just cut and paste the ramblings of someone else's opinions.

That was my opinion, and as I was poking around the internet it looked like that it was confirmed by that and oher articles I found, so it was just easier to post that than have to come back after people called for a source. I guess one can't win either way. ::shrug::



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User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30553 posts, RR: 84
Reply 4, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2620 times:
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To quote Boeing Global Advertising:

Quote:
The Boeing Company is known around the world as a leading manufacturer of commercial airplanes. What's less well known is that Boeing is also a leader in space technology, defense aircraft and systems, and communication systems. Our advertising campaigns close the gap between current perceptions of Boeing and our true scope as a global aerospace company.

Boeing's advertising is actually spread across a number of their areas of expertise. There are actually three "Why We're Here" campaigns:

  • One is for Integrated Defense and Space which showcases Boeing's military systems and their use in support of US forces overseas.
  • One is for Boeing Commercial Aircraft which showcases the 787 and how it will positively impact people's travel.
  • One is about technology in general and how Boeing is a leader in applying it to aerospace.


Personally, I dislike this new campaign. I much prefer "Horizons" which intermixed the entire array of products Boeing builds - military, commercial, and space.
And even before "Horizons", Boeing had a fantastic set of commercials that really resonated with me on many levels. My two favorites was the one right after the 1991 Persian Gulf War and the one about the ISS with Sultan Salman Abdulaziz Al-Saud commenting on the first day he saw the borders of countries, but soon he only saw one Earth.

The "Horizons" campaign was one of the main reasons I joined Boeing. I wanted to work for and be part of a company that was doing so many cool things. And their earlier campaigns made me want to fly their planes. It was also one of the reasons I invested in the company as a shareholder.




I have only seen Airbus' commercial aircraft commercials and they all concentrated on how nice it was to fly in an Airbus plane.


User currently offlineMirrodie From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 7443 posts, RR: 62
Reply 5, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2609 times:
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Quoting Stitch (Reply 4):
Boeing's advertising is actually spread across a number of their areas of expertise. There are actually three "Why We're Here" campaigns:



One is for Integrated Defense and Space which showcases Boeing's military systems and their use in support of US forces overseas.

One is for Boeing Commercial Aircraft which showcases the 787 and how it will positively impact people's travel.

One is about technology in general and how Boeing is a leader in applying it to aerospace.

OK, now that is pretty interesting. But to take my point a step further, I would think that the Defense and Space and Aerospace industries would again more on internal advertising as opposed to full out commercials. As for how it will impact people's travel, I can't really see that when people's travel is going to be affected more by what the airline decides to outfit hte a/c with once they buy it.

Interesting points Stitch, esp. regarding Horizons. So I can see the end being fulfilled there as being that of jobs (wanting to be a part of it) and perhaps even stockholders.



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User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20375 posts, RR: 62
Reply 6, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 2591 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 4):
To quote Boeing Global Advertising:

That message from Boeing's website pretty much reinforces that they're buying perceptions, which you were influenced by, not encouraging direct purchases from the general audience they're advertising to on television.



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User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30553 posts, RR: 84
Reply 7, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2530 times:
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Quoting Mirrodie (Reply 5):
But to take my point a step further, I would think that the Defense and Space and Aerospace industries would again more on internal advertising as opposed to full out commercials.

Well I think you would agree that "supporting the troops" is viewed as a positive thing to do here in the States, so Boeing noting that they, too, support the troops - and in a very direct way - would probably be seen by BGA and management as a way to generate "goodwill" towards Boeing as a company and influence the general public to follow the old saw - "If it's not a Boeing, then I'm not going".

Quoting AeroWesty (Reply 6):
That message from Boeing's website pretty much reinforces that they're buying perceptions, which you were influenced by, not encouraging direct purchases from the general audience they're advertising to on television.

Which makes perfect sense, as only a relative handful of folks who see that commercial would be in the market for a BBJ.  Smile However, by generating and reinforcing a positive view of Boeing in my mind, I become more inclined to select Boeing when I do have a choice or just a general sense of "Boeing is a good company so I want to invest in them".


User currently offlineAeroWesty From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 20375 posts, RR: 62
Reply 8, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 4 days ago) and read 2496 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 7):
However, by generating and reinforcing a positive view of Boeing in my mind, I become more inclined to select Boeing when I do have a choice or just a general sense of "Boeing is a good company so I want to invest in them".

Or giving them more airtime or column inches when they have news, since they're a company that's providing part of a newspaper's or broadcaster's revenue stream. I would venture a guess that there are very very few decision makers for 787 engines who've been swayed by seeing a GE ecomagination commercial on TV, but the ads give a reason for people to think that GE is a good company, which buys them enormous amounts of goodwill across many lines, and at very little cost.



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User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9490 posts, RR: 52
Reply 9, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2440 times:

Stockholders

Boeing does a lot of its advertising to raise its stock price. People get to learn about how great of a company it is and how diverse it is. In exchange, they might just purchase Boeing stock. If the price of the stock goes up, everyone's happy. The company is worth more money. It can borrow funds more easily. Employees get larger paychecks via stock options. The net effect is that the company is worth more if you invest in it.

The company that really annoys me is United Technologies. It is a parent ownership company. You will never find a product that is branded United Technologies, yet they advertise to push up their stock price. For those that don't know, United Technologies is the parent company of Pratt & Whitney, Hamilton Sundstrand, Otis Elevators, Carrier Air Conditioners, Sikorsky Helicopters, and UTC fire and security.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineBrenintw From Taiwan, joined Jul 2006, 1610 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (7 years 2 months 1 week 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 2414 times:

Boeing advertises because that's how they sell perceptions -- that's how they influence Joe Public's ideas.

A good few months ago, I attended a marketing seminar (I can't remember who the speaker was unfortunately). In the course of the seminar the speaker asked "why do Harleys sound the way they do?" -- he then answered himself with an interesting observation: "because their engines are crap!"

Whether you agree or disagree with his assessment, you can't deny that Harleys have a unique sound.

He then went on to quote a former Harley executive (and I'm going to paraphrase this, because my memory isn't everything my boss makes it out to be). His starting point was essentially "if the engines are so out-dated, why do people still buy them? Why not buy a new Japanese bike?"

The answer lay in the former exec's assessment: "Harleys sell because they allow a 40-something accountant to drive through a small town in middle-America, and the people are afraid of him." Harley doesn't sell a motorcycle -- Harley sells a feeling (of power).

Boeing's advertising isn't to sell products to viewers -- it's not even to convince viewers to fly on Boeing aircraft. Boeing's advertising is to sell "goodwill" -- that intangible that can, and does, have an enormous effect on a company's worth.



I'm tired of the A vs. B sniping. Neither make planes that shed wings randomly!
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