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Can I Be A Commercial Pilot If I Am Colour Blind?  
User currently offlineDeaphen From India, joined Jul 2005, 1428 posts, RR: 1
Posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 23308 times:

I dont need to say more.. i think i am colour blind, i have tried a few online tests and cant see some numbers in the circles.

Is it a complete bar? is there anyway around it?

I havent got tested oficially yet... but just wondering!

regards
nitin


I want every single airport and airplane in India to be on A.net!
15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNosedive From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 23300 times:

Google says....

User currently offlineJlk From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 184 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 23230 times:

Quoting Deaphen (Thread starter):
Is it a complete bar? is there anyway around it?

Can u get ur driver's license first?  confused 


User currently offlineGeorgiaAME From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 1000 posts, RR: 6
Reply 3, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 23141 times:

You will not be eligible for Class 1 medical status, and that will eliminate you from flying commercially. You can fly if color blind, but in the FAA's language, you will be restricted as follows: "Not valid for Night Flight or by color signal controls." Those 2 restrictions will eliminate you from Class I commercial pilot status with say Delta or Continental. However, you can obtain a Class 2 medical, which would allow you to charge for transportation within the private sector. Again, you won't be allowed to fly at night, nor will you be allowed to use airports with color signals guidance systems. And as an aside, I don't know if you are familiar with the X-Chrome contact lens. It is a deep red lens that increases the contrast between red and green, which in turn lessens the impact of being color blind. They are not allowed by the FAA, so if you are color blind, and normally use an X-chrome on the ground, it still won't be valid for flying, in either Class II or Class III.

Hope this helps.



"Trust, but verify!" An old Russian proverb, quoted often by a modern American hero
User currently offline777DEN From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 124 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 23055 times:

I t depends, if you can distinguishthe red/green light gun colors you can get you license and medicals. My brother-in-law is colorblind and fails the paper tests but was able to tell the difference between the R/G colors when tested at the airport and got his licenses

User currently offlineSean-SAN- From United States of America, joined Aug 2002, 772 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 22876 times:

I just got my 1st class renewed 2 weeks ago... normal color blind paper slides were used...

User currently offlineJamesJimlb From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1023 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 22849 times:

uh-oh i took the online test and failed, i guess i'll have to take the real test


The sky is no longer the limit, but the mere minimum
User currently offlineRwy04LGA From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 22715 times:

NO!

That's why I'M not a commercial or military pilot! My Dad flew -17s in WWII and then -29s and ended with -52s. I wanted to fly C-5s SOOOOO bad. I went for my USAF medical and the doctor said matter-of-factly 'Well, that's that!!' I felt as though my heart had been ripped out and stomped on. I walked out of the office in a daze, not believing what I had just heard. If you've seen the movie 'Little Miss Sunshine' you'll understand some of the emotion involved'



Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlineRwy04LGA From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 8, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 22710 times:

You might get a 'Demonstrated Waiver' that will allow you to fly at night.


Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offline2175301 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1085 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 22595 times:

I researched this question in depth years ago.

The full answer is "it depends."

There are many versions of color blindness. The most common is red-green - and what the vast majority of people think of when they hear the term "color blind".

If you are substantially red-green color blind you will not be able to fly as a commercial pilot.

On the other hand, if you have one of the rarer versions of color blindness that affects other colors (like maybe you can't see brown) - then you would probably have no problem in becoming a commercial pilot.

There are many versions of color blind testing. The fullest version that I know of uses several hundred cards - and it's the one that can sort out all the rarer forms of color blindness (and I've taken that test - it takes a while).

Most color blind testing uses a range of 10 to 30 cards. They test well the most common forms - and the sets used for pilot physicals are cover the specific colors that a pilot must be able to distinguish.

Computer color blind testing may not be accurate because of poor color control on what the computer monitor is showing you.

Get the testing done by someone who uses the card set for pilots.

When I was in the Navy they had a light test that you took (I passed that). I'm not sure how accepted the light test is for commercial pilots.


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8371 posts, RR: 23
Reply 10, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 22577 times:

Quoting Rwy04LGA (Reply 7):
NO!

That's why I'M not a commercial or military pilot!

Okay, uh, that's wrong. You absolutely can get a 1st class medical certificate and a job with the airlines even with a color deficiency. With the FAA they'll put you in a parking lot at flight standards and shoot a light gun at you. If you can distinguish white from green from red, you're set. It's called a statement of demonstrated ability. I'm red/green colorblind but I can distinguish red/green/white/amber as used in aviation with no difficulty. So, short answer is yes, it's absolutely possible.



This Website Censors Me
User currently offlineSixtySeven From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 344 posts, RR: 3
Reply 11, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 22536 times:

READ THIS!!!!

The first thing you have to do is actually figure out if you are color blind or not. I fly 767's for AC, and was initially told I could never fly because I was colorblind. I fought it.

When you initially go to an AME, they will give you a color test with the Ishihara Color Test. It is the test that has a bunch of multi-colored dots and you are supposed to be able to see a number. If you are color "perfect" you will see a certain number. If you have a deficiency you will see other numbers.

Now. I know what I am talking about here because I have Cat 1 medicals in the US and Canada so the same standard applies to both countries.

There are three tests available to candidates that can determine color "efficiency." The problem is, most AMEs do not know this. Most AMEs only have the "dot" test because it is the most cheap test available to doctors. It's just a little flip chart. The next test, which is actually the "gold standard" when it comes to color "blindness" is the Farnsworth D-15 color saturation test. This comprises of 15 pastel "pucks" that are numbered 1-15. The doctor mixes them up and you match the closest shade to the baseline shade. This test will actually tell the examiner if you are colorblind or not. The Ishihara test will only tell the examiner if you have a color deficiency.

The last test is the FAA and TC basic test. In Canada they call it the lantern test. Two shades of green lights, a white and a red light. If you can tell the difference between them, you pass.

I am color deficient. But I pass the Latern and Farnsworth but the Ishihara says I have a major deutan (?) blue/green defiency.

I reserached this like crazy and I hope you read this because that goddammed Ishihara test prematurely ended more possible aviation careers than you could imagine. Where it stems from is the second world war. Everyone wanted to be a pilot and they were looking for any reason to weed people out. Despite the other tests being relevant, medical examiners in the USAAF used the most restrictive test as there were ample "able" candidates to fill the demand.

The problem is, this practice carried on. My older brother was told he could never fly because he failed the Ishihara test. I came along and failed it to but would not take no for an answer. I had to call all sorts of AMEs in Canada and finally found these other two tests buried in their manuals. I had to drive four hours to an AME who had the Farnsworth test and passed it easily. The sad thing was years later my older brother took the farnsworth test and passed. He could have flown for a living but took the doctors word for it.

If there is one thing I could ever do, I ask you make them prove your color blindness. Don't take no for an answer. Too many people in the past have been told this and never knew there were options. I have always wanted a forum to tell this story and I hope as many people with this problem read it. Best of luck, and I hope you pass!!!!!

Sixty.



Stand-by for new ATIS message......
User currently offlineGateHold From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 22470 times:

Yes, in America it's possible to receive a waiver from the FAA. I know somebody in the States who is both color blind and has a Class-1 medical certificate. But the question is from a user in India. I don't know about Indian or ICAO rules.

J


User currently offlineSixtySeven From Canada, joined Nov 2006, 344 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 22459 times:

Further to the above.

Education and not rumor is the key here. How many times I have been asked by people if pilots required 20/20 vision? How many times people said "do I have to be good at math?"

I remember as a young lad visiting cockpits thats what they said. Why? What else are they going to say? It sort of makes sense but at the end of the day it has nothing to do with anything. A doctor said I was color blind because he bought the cheapest test required to be an AME. If you were a MD and wanted to be certified as an AME and you needed a color test, you're likely to purchase the one for $19.95, right? Not his fault, but it would have been nice to know I had another choice before being told my dream of flying airplanes was shattered.

My company didn't have the other tests and after I was done probation I MADE them spend the 100 bucks to get the farnsworth test. If it helps one person, I am glad.

At the end of the day it's all about aptitude and common sense. If you have it, you can fly. I am saddened by someone who had 20/100 vision and was told he could never fly and he took the persons word for it because "everyone knows pilots have to have perfect vision.". Who was he to second guess them, they were pilots!!!

Fight for what you want.



Stand-by for new ATIS message......
User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9229 posts, RR: 76
Reply 14, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 22456 times:

Quoting Deaphen (Thread starter):
I dont need to say more.. i think i am colour blind, i have tried a few online tests and cant see some numbers in the circles.

Firstly, you are not supposed to see all the numbers in the circles (Ishihara Test), they have a few in the sequence that you can only read if you are color blind.

Secondary, some of the on-line tests are scanned images from books, so they in themselves defective.

Quoting Deaphen (Thread starter):
Is it a complete bar? is there anyway around it?

By all means no, in India you would be more like the British standards, you should be able to do a Farnsworth Lantern Test (FALANT).

Quoting Deaphen (Thread starter):
I havent got tested oficially yet... but just wondering!

Get a full class 1 medical done before you invest into a flying career.



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offlineRwy04LGA From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (7 years 7 months 1 week 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 22417 times:

Quoting N766UA (Reply 10):
Okay, uh, that's wrong. You absolutely can get a 1st class medical certificate and a job with the airlines even with a color deficiency. With the FAA they'll put you in a parking lot at flight standards and shoot a light gun at you. If you can distinguish white from green from red, you're set. It's called a statement of demonstrated ability. I'm red/green colorblind but I can distinguish red/green/white/amber as used in aviation with no difficulty. So, short answer is yes, it's absolutely possible.

Where were you when I needed you in 1975? I also can distinguish those colors. But, I was told that neither the USAF nor the airlines would accept a 'Demonstrated Waiver'. And I have been told that by MANY people.


Quoting SixtySeven (Reply 11):
The next test, which is actually the "gold standard" when it comes to color "blindness" is the Farnsworth D-15 color saturation test. This comprises of 15 pastel "pucks" that are numbered 1-15. The doctor mixes them up and you match the closest shade to the baseline shade. This test will actually tell the examiner if you are colorblind or not.

I failed this test perfectly!!! The sequence was SUPPOSED to be 1-2-3-4-5-6-7..... I got 1-15-2-14-3-13-4-12-5-11.....On a pattern vaguely similar to a clockface, my lines went in a zigzag pattern instead of the sequential circular pattern.

Please don't tell me that after all these years that I could've been living my dream. I'm now 50, so if I hurry I Might make right seat in a C-5 or 744 before I turn 60.

I gotta go...wish me luck!



Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
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