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"Somebody...May Build A Factory They Won't Need.."  
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2359 times:

Just a 'throwaway' line by Mike Bair, Program Director for the 787, speaking in Paris a few minutes ago.

The rest of his comments were straight down the line - 'playing a straight bat," as fellow cricket fans would say:-

"We are where we need to be," Bair said. He added that "we have pockets that are behind," but the overall schedule for production of the 787 as laid out four years ago is on track.

"Bair said "there's nothing that we see" that will get in the way of delivering the plane on time. His staff is "tusseling" with Boeing salesmen over increasing production rates at some point, he added.

"We are actually trying to be really careful," Bair said.

"The novelty of the new carbon-fiber composites used for the first time to build the plane's body and wings may actually result in greater manufacturing efficiency than first thought, he said.

"Also new in the project, Boeing is relying on suppliers around the world to build components. Because manufacturing has gone so smoothly, he said, "somebody somewhere may build a factory they won't need."


http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/...OWJONESDJONLINE000366_FORTUNE5.htm

Must admit that I'm at a loss to understand that last comment - what do other people think that he meant by it?

[Edited 2007-06-19 15:50:27]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 12274 posts, RR: 25
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 2265 times:

The link didn't load for me.

From your quotes, he's concerned about building too much manufacturing capacity. One SARS outbreak or something worse could see a lot of the order backlog deferred or cancelled.

On the other hand, Boeing has said that the quality of the composite parts they've been seeing is better than they anticipated, so perhaps there's no need to expand capacity, the existing infrastructure is doing better than planned.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineN328KF From United States of America, joined May 2004, 6483 posts, RR: 3
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2214 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Thread starter):
Must admit that I'm at a loss to understand that last comment - what do other people think that he meant by it?

It means that he believes that efficiency is projected to be so high that there may be surplus capacity in the system. If they don't need it, then it opens that capacity up for myriad other possibilities.



When they call the roll in the Senate, the Senators do not know whether to answer 'Present' or 'Not guilty.' T.Roosevelt
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2214 times:

Sorry about the link, Revelation - works from here.

Maybe he just meant that, after years of 'keeping it in the family,' Boeing had finally realised that they can depend on overseas suppliers to meet or even better their own exacting quality standards?

[Edited 2007-06-19 16:16:22]


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineLumberton From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 4708 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2175 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Thread starter):
what do other people think that he meant by it?

Perhaps it's a plea for more capacity?  Wink



"When all is said and done, more will be said than done".
User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2108 times:

Thing is, Lumberton, it proves (to MY satisfaction anyway) that Boeing management, at this moment, are genuinely confident that they're 'on track.' It's often the indirect comments that give a better guide than the direct ones as to a given manager's state of mind.


"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlinePPVRA From Brazil, joined Nov 2004, 8929 posts, RR: 40
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 2038 times:

Perhaps he was referring to the Japanese going ahead to built that other plant (think it was a barrel plant. . . maybe wings?).


"If goods do not cross borders, soldiers will" - Frederic Bastiat
User currently offlineDAYflyer From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 3807 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1985 times:

Perhpas it means more capacity than needed for 1 line, so no more is required for a 2nd line??


One Nation Under God
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 30406 posts, RR: 84
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1967 times:
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Rumors are that Kawasaki may be building a second facility to build 787 parts, so maybe it's a hint to the Japanese to not over-extend themselves.

Spirit has enough space to build three additional Section 41s at the same time, so they're covered. Don't know how Alenia and Vought are doing for space.


User currently offlineSirOmega From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 735 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 1931 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Thread starter):


"The novelty of the new carbon-fiber composites used for the first time to build the plane's body and wings may actually result in greater manufacturing efficiency than first thought, he said.

I think that means that they'll be able to snap the pieces together quicker. Dovetailing with the announcement yesterday of the wings being nearly exactly on (zero and .0001" for right and left) less work is needed if you dont have to shim or massage anything into place.

Boeing doesnt need to build a second line if they can produce 7 or 8 planes/week.


User currently offlineXT6Wagon From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 3378 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1901 times:

I think its a clear slap at Airbus. If say Boeing does go to 20/month on the 787 line and finds it can sling them all day long at $90M or less, it is possible that their early start coupled with high production numbers could shove the A350 out of existence. I doubt it personally but its *possible*. Worse for Airbus would be getting a foot in the door, then their leg, just to have the door kicked closed. Airbus CAN'T have another A340 or A340NG style "success" after the A380 so carefully took Airbus's entire historical goodwill, credibility, and capital out back and burned it in one great bonfire.

User currently offlineNAV20 From Australia, joined Nov 2003, 9909 posts, RR: 36
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1869 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 6):
Perhaps he was referring to the Japanese going ahead to built that other plant (think it was a barrel plant. . . maybe wings?).

Just can't see Bair (or any other Boeing manager) kicking one of their own loyal suppliers/partners in the teeth, PPVRA?



"Once you have flown, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards.." - Leonardo da Vinci
User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13005 posts, RR: 12
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1821 times:

Perhaps a sub-contractor will build additional capacity beyond that potential future advances in making the manufacturing process more efficient and as experience over time will lead to. They may think there is a need for capacity at first as the flow may be slower than later after more experience in the manufacturing process to keep up with the demand for the 787 and the planned delivery schedules. Of course, changes in the world's economy, oil prices and the like may affect demand and spread out delivery schedules, which could shift demand down to sub-contractors for as much capacity.

User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6056 posts, RR: 29
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1731 times:
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Quoting NAV20 (Thread starter):
"somebody somewhere may build a factory they won't need."

It has happened before. Chrysler built a plant near Pittsburgh they never used and later sold it to VW. It was a disaster to VW (very low quality Rabbits) and now it is a Sony TV plant.

Miller Brewing Company built a plant in Trenton, Ohio in the early 80a and it took ten years for production to get to a level where they actually needed it.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 1):
From your quotes, he's concerned about building too much manufacturing capacity

I can see why that would be important. Look at the excess capacity in many US manufacturing operations, particularly in the auto sector. 10 years ago there was massive amounts of excess capacity in the US brewing business. I think he wants to avoid that in the aircraft business.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 1):
One SARS outbreak or something worse could see a lot of the order backlog deferred or cancelled.

It is hard to plan for that sort of thing. But if that were to happen..... The international market would shrivel.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12281 posts, RR: 47
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1720 times:
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Quoting XT6Wagon (Reply 10):
I think its a clear slap at Airbus.

I'm surprised. But then again, maybe not.

However, I thought Boeing didn't play "games" like these? scratchchin 



Time flies like an arrow, but fruit flies like a banana!
User currently offlineAminobwana From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1703 times:

Quoting NAV20 (Reply 11):
Just can't see Bair (or any other Boeing manager) kicking one of their own loyal suppliers/partners in the teeth, PPVRA?

Possibly, even if not probably, he wants to avoid that the suppliers build up an excess capacity referred to Boeings needs, which later could benefice Airbus. But this do should not refer to Barrels, unless Airbus finally make the switch from panels to barrels.

aminobwana


User currently offlineJwenting From Netherlands, joined Apr 2001, 10213 posts, RR: 19
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 21 hours ago) and read 1660 times:

Quoting Revelation (Reply 1):
From your quotes, he's concerned about building too much manufacturing capacity. One SARS outbreak or something worse could see a lot of the order backlog deferred or cancelled.

No. He seems to mean that production capacity of factories is higher than envisioned so they may have a surplus with the planned factories.



I wish I were flying
User currently offlineDEVILFISH From Philippines, joined Jan 2006, 4770 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 1393 times:

Quoting PPVRA (Reply 6):
Perhaps he was referring to the Japanese going ahead to built that other plant (think it was a barrel plant. . .



Quoting Stitch (Reply 8):
Rumors are that Kawasaki may be building a second facility to build 787 parts, so maybe it's a hint to the Japanese to not over-extend themselves.



Quoting NAV20 (Reply 11):
Just can't see Bair (or any other Boeing manager) kicking one of their own loyal suppliers/partners in the teeth,

Well, there is this bit of news......

http://www.flightglobal.com/articles...launches-regional-jet-concept.html

Quote:
"Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries is showing off a full-scale mock-up of the cabin of its proposed Mitsubishi Regional Jet (MRJ). MHI has been working on the possible launch of a 70-90 seat regional jet as a project within the country’s New Energy and Industrial Development Organization (NEDO).

The concept calls for the aircraft to have an all-composite airframe, the first of its kind in the regional jet market. The ultimate aim of the effort is to build and test an aircraft incorporating the new control and material technologies developed during the project."



"Everyone is entitled to my opinion." - Garfield
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