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Great Picture Of Steep DC9 Takeoff  
User currently offlineKPDX From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 2749 posts, RR: 2
Posted (7 years 3 months 23 hours ago) and read 21442 times:

I just ran across this picture.


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Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Luis Tena Orozco - AeroImagenes de Mexico



Is it normal for those planes to climb that steep? I know they climb steep already, but wow.

KPDX  Smile


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38 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMPDPilot From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 993 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 23 hours ago) and read 21442 times:

I don't know if it is normal but I have always thought that the DC-9s and MD-80s have always had a very steep climbout.


One mile of highway gets you one mile, one mile of runway gets you anywhere.
User currently offlineOceansWorld From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 23 hours ago) and read 21372 times:

Quoting KPDX (Thread starter):
Is it normal for those planes to climb that steep? I know they climb steep already, but wow.

I've often seen DC-9s and MD-80s climbing that steeply right after lift-off, but I don't think this rate of climb can be maintained for long as engines thrust must be disturbed by the wings airflow. Just my  twocents 


User currently offlineLexy From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 2515 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 23 hours ago) and read 21344 times:

Good grief! Better be chewing some gum if you are on that plane.


Nashville, Tennessee KBNA
User currently offlineDrewwright From United States of America, joined May 2001, 621 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 21145 times:

The initial climb after rotation is normally steep for most aircraft for obstacle clearance, etc. Once it passes acceleration height, the nose is lowered to accelerate to climb speed.

User currently offlineBongo From Colombia, joined Oct 2003, 1863 posts, RR: 4
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 21080 times:

It looks normal to me.


MDE: First airport in the Americas visited by the A380!
User currently offlineRandyWaldron From United States of America, joined Mar 2006, 324 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 21051 times:

Quoting KPDX (Thread starter):
Is it normal for those planes to climb that steep? I know they climb steep already, but wow.

There's nothing overly strange about this picture. It's a typical DC9 climbing after rotation.



"Flaps 20, gear down, landing checklist please..."
User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 22 hours ago) and read 21030 times:

I enjoy the comment on that photo, "I would have to say the pilot was a little above the desired take-off angle."

I suppose he was in the cockpit, knew the load configuration, weather, etc to know what the desired climb out pitch was...  Wink


User currently offlineN766UA From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 8268 posts, RR: 23
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 21 hours ago) and read 20783 times:

Quoting Bongo (Reply 5):
It looks normal to me.

I second that. I don't see anything worth commenting on.



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User currently offlinePITops From United States of America, joined May 2007, 1442 posts, RR: 4
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 20588 times:

If you want to see a steep climb, come to PIT and watch the UPS DC-8 takeoff. It really has a steep takeoff.

After the DC-9 and MD-80s takeoff, they have a steep start but then seem to look like they are dropping a bit after about 20 seconds or so.



Ground Ops, Southwest Airlines, CMH
User currently offlineTrijetsRMissed From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 2353 posts, RR: 7
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 20554 times:

Nothing abnormal, the DC-9/MD-80/-90/717 all have above average steep take-offs when compared to rhe 737/A320, which is why they're fun to fly on.  Smile


There's nothing quite like a tri-jet.
User currently offlineIAHFLYR From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 4790 posts, RR: 22
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 20534 times:

Quoting PITops (Reply 9):
After the DC-9 and MD-80s takeoff, they have a steep start but then seem to look like they are dropping a bit after about 20 seconds or so.

They are most likely starting to configure for climb and retracting the flaps at 1,000" AGL or so.. That is quite apparent to all departing airline class aircraft.



Any views shared are strictly my own and do not a represent those of any former employer.
User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2823 posts, RR: 45
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 20449 times:

Quoting OceansWorld (Reply 2):
but I don't think this rate of climb can be maintained for long as engines thrust must be disturbed by the wings airflow.

The airflow to the engines is not an issue.

Quoting RandyWaldron (Reply 6):
e's nothing overly strange about this picture. It's a typical DC9 climbing after rotation.

Agreed. I have a lot of time in the DC-9 and MD-80 family, and it doesn't look excessive for a reasonable weight takeoff. Depending on the model, weight, flap setting, density altitude and several other factors, normal two engine pitch for a DC-9-30 will initially be around 15 to 18 degrees nose up. Many operators have advisories in their manuals not to exceed 20 degrees nose up for passenger comfort. At light weights the MD-80 and 90 series may accelerate well above V2+15 KIAS while holding the pitch at 20 degrees. The DC-9 and MD-80 series are quite good performers except when very heavy or at very high density altitudes.

Quoting PITops (Reply 9):
After the DC-9 and MD-80s takeoff, they have a steep start but then seem to look like they are dropping a bit after about 20 seconds or so.

At 1,000 AGL we lower the nose to accelerate, just like most other aircraft. (There are exceptions to this rule in a few situations.)

Quoting IAHFLYR (Reply 11):
They are most likely starting to configure for climb and retracting the flaps at 1,000" AGL or so.. That is quite apparent to all departing airline class aircraft.

 checkmark  Exactly!


User currently offlineDIA From United States of America, joined Jan 2001, 3273 posts, RR: 27
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 20 hours ago) and read 20430 times:

That's fiddle faddle...just try to lean forward on this one:
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Ricardo Morales Centeno - APM

Feel the G's yet?



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User currently offlinePGNCS From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 2823 posts, RR: 45
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 months 19 hours ago) and read 20285 times:

Quoting DIA (Reply 13):
That's fiddle faddle...just try to lean forward on this one:


Feel the G's yet?

Interestingly, airlines I have worked for limit the MD-80/90 series to 20 degrees nose up on takeoff for passenger comfort, while the 757 is limited to 18. There are exceptional procedures (SNA comes to mind), but in reality both will generally somewhere between 15 and 18 degrees nose up during the initial climbout.


User currently offlineType-Rated From United States of America, joined Sep 1999, 5033 posts, RR: 19
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 months 16 hours ago) and read 19998 times:

The first photo was taken at MEX in late August.
I don't know where you could go to get a higher density altitude than that!
That DC-9 had to be lightly loaded.



Fly North Central Airlines..The route of the Northliners!
User currently offlineReverseThrust From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2005, 113 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 months 14 hours ago) and read 19433 times:

Looks averagely steep to me for a DC-9 / MD-80 take off.

I have had some incredibly steep take off's in MD-80's - notbaly trips with Alitalia and Finnair.

Something that adds an additional thrill to the steep climb is the sometimes very short take-off run DC9-s and MD-80's have.

Long live these birds, both are a real pleasure to fly.

Regards,

Reverse



Flown MD11/81/82/83/87/90,B732/733/734/735/737W/738/739/742/752/753,F70/100,A300/319/320/321/332/333/343,TU134A/154M,L10
User currently offlineLufthansi From Germany, joined May 2002, 454 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 months 13 hours ago) and read 18841 times:

Seems normal imo. Would love to go on one of those. SAS is making a space shuttle like take off as well with their MDs. No matter if MD80 or MD11.


Life starts at take-off!
User currently offlineAirTran717 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 746 posts, RR: 4
Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 months 12 hours ago) and read 17841 times:

Some airports and surrounding city areas have noise abatement restrictions. This requires a steep climb out to get beyond that area quickly. Orange County is one of them. 757's take a rather extreme departure angle on climbout there due to noise abatement. But, to add to others here, I see nothing out of the ordinary from this DC-9. Try going into MDW after a short final and they clear you in NOW. Feels like a strafing run from a P-51 Mustang. Better be strapped into your seats...

User currently offlineSv2008 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2006, 622 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 3 months 12 hours ago) and read 17810 times:

what was interesting about that pic I thought wasn't the angle but that the wheels are already half retracted just off the ground!

User currently offlineBimmerkid19 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (7 years 3 months 11 hours ago) and read 17586 times:

Quoting KPDX (Thread starter):
Steep



Quoting KPDX (Thread starter):
Takeoff

Hmm... thats usually normal for DC-9´s.... I´ve flown on 9´s a lot. Well a bit off topic now... but.... back in December.. I was on KE flight 038 from ORD to ICN on 26-Dec in a B744. ... man.... we used pratically every last foot and inch of RWY 32L. I was watching signs on the side of the runway.. we still hadnt rotated after passing the 1000 foot left mark.. somewhere between the 1000 and 500 mark the plane start to tilt towards the air and bounced a bit on the runway and then got airborne very sluggishly.... and we stayed on the same heading until we were at about 18,000 feet.. and the plane took forever and a day to get to the intial cruise altitude of FL290. The jet had FOB for 19 Hours and 100% capacity.. also 338 pax. and lots of cargo...


User currently offlineImperialEagle From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2597 posts, RR: 22
Reply 21, posted (7 years 3 months 11 hours ago) and read 17559 times:
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Quoting DIA (Reply 13):
Feel the G's yet?

That photo is wonderful! Reminds me of take-offs in the Boeing 720B.  bigthumbsup 

As for the DC-9 photo---looks normal. Of course with a full load on a hot day-----just because it has the angle does not mean it will climb like a rocket.
In the 1970's ATL was a bastion of DC-9's and there were plenty of hot summers days when one could observe DC-9's of all series struggling to gain some altitude after take-off.

Ever watched a heavy -50 on a hot day. Lead sled man.  eyepopping 



"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough!"
User currently offlineFlyingchoirboy From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 281 posts, RR: 4
Reply 22, posted (7 years 3 months 10 hours ago) and read 15923 times:
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Quoting ImperialEagle (Reply 21):
In the 1970's ATL was a bastion of DC-9's and there were plenty of hot summers days when one could observe DC-9's of all series struggling to gain some altitude after take-off.

AirTran Airways B717s have (to some extent) taken over that role, and their climb is not too shabby, having seen plenty take off from there.

Scott



Flyingchoirboy: He sings, he flies, and sometimes he does both at the same time.
User currently offlineJamesJimlb From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1023 posts, RR: 2
Reply 23, posted (7 years 3 months 8 hours ago) and read 13741 times:

looks like my take offs on fs2004 with everyplane.  Smile


The sky is no longer the limit, but the mere minimum
User currently offlineShane From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 180 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (7 years 3 months 8 hours ago) and read 13378 times:

Is it true that Mexican pilots are known for their, uh, how shall I put this...

"spirited" or rather "balls to the wall" flying? If so, I'm booking only Mexican carriers on my next trip south!


25 Post contains images KPDX : I kinda already said I know they climb pretty steep, just the AoA looked kinda high, maybe just when I first looked at it, it looked steeper. But than
26 PGNCS : I have done simulation instruction for both Mexicana and Aeromexico, and they both have very professional, by the book cockpit crews. There is a degr
27 CRJ900 : I have had many steep take-offs with SAS MD80s but their MD90 was less steep. Due to the extended fuselage maybe?
28 CPHGuard : I don't beleive SAS ever had any MD11's Cheers
29 DeltaDC9 : Roller coasters and DC-9s, two of my favorite thrill rides. Looks like a run of the mill takeoff to me.
30 Post contains links and images OtnySASLHR : As it's been already said that looks a fairly normal DC9 take off. However the most impressive were the SAS DC9-21 or as the crews called them "DC9 Sp
31 Post contains links and images Captaink : Quoting MPDPilot (Reply 1): I don't know if it is normal but I have always thought that the DC-9s and MD-80s have always had a very steep climbout. I
32 Post contains images N243NW : We see a lot of MD-80s into and out of MKE...when they're taking off away from you and they rotate thousands of feet down the runway, it looks like t
33 GEEDO : Hey dude, you should watch the UPS 767 that pulls out of here around 5:15 PM. I drive north into Vancouver every night on I-5, and that flight is alwa
34 Post contains links and images JumboJim747 : I think most rear engined aircraft tend to rotate at a more extreme angle might have something to do with the tail plane mounted so high View Large Vi
35 Andaman : I have had same experiences, unfortunately Finnair hasn't any MD-80s left anymore, just A320's and E170/190's.
36 SkyexRamper : It's all in the wing. The DC-9 features super critical airfoils ie: swept wings designed for high speed flight. This requires a higher deck angle that
37 MotorHussy : Looks normal to me. 737's out of WLG are often climbing at a more acute rate than that.
38 Post contains images Ghost77 : I was there right next to Tena the day the picture was taken, it sure is impressive, but issue here, or at least, what i helped, is the high level it
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