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Charter Airlines With A 'scheduled Service'  
User currently offlineEnglandair From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2000, 2228 posts, RR: 3
Posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 18 hours ago) and read 1842 times:

This might not make sence but:

Which charter airlines offer the same sort of service as scheduled airlines? By this I mean they're only charters because they only fly when enough people will book seats.

From what I've read on the Caledonian Wings website, they will be a charter airline but offer a service typical of a scheduled airline (eg. wide seats, proper meals etc.).

Cheers,
Jamie.

ps. If you've no idea what I'm on about- my apologies!

9 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineJ. S. Pearson From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 1801 times:

In essence, charter airlines operate solely because of travel group connections, for example, Britannia is in existance because of Thomas Cook.

Anyway, in answer of your question, I know Air 2000 are offering increasing scheduled services, particularly from regional airports, primarily to Cyprus and the normal Spanish holiday resorts. Monarch offers a limited scheduled service network from Luton. Perhaps the main reason why such an airline operates such a service, is because of aircraft utilisation. Perhaps the aircraft would otherwise not be in use, thus they airline's using this to increase the daily usage of the aircraft.

By slightly diversifying, an airline may attract a wider audience, particularly those who prefer added comforts, for example seat spacing, better food, like though frequently found aboard scheduled airlines. The aim of this venture, is like virtually everything else: slightly altering its product, to attract a wider audience (or new market), thus increasing revenue and thus satisying its shareholders.

Hope this helps.


User currently offlineGKirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24924 posts, RR: 56
Reply 2, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1785 times:

Monarch offer scheduled flights from LTN and MAN
Air 2000 offer from MAN,NCL,GLA,BHX,BRS,LGW.



When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineJ. S. Pearson From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1780 times:

Indeed, that's why I said, "... Air 2000 is increasing its scheduled service from regional airports... Monarch operates such services from LTN." I just omitted MAN from the latter's scheduled service hubs.

User currently offlineEnglandair From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2000, 2228 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 1776 times:

Sorry- I didn't explain what I ment very well.

Are there any charter airlines that are just like scheduled airlines, except for the fact that they only fly when enough seats are sold?
For example, X Airlines offering a similar type of service to BA/UA/VS etc but only going from say London to New York when N numbers of seats have been 'sold'.

Hope this makes sence!


User currently offlineGKirk From UK - Scotland, joined Jun 2000, 24924 posts, RR: 56
Reply 5, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1771 times:

Englandair, I believe there is'nt. Not in the UK anyway.


When you hear the noise of the Tartan Army Boys, we'll be coming down the road!
User currently offlineJ. S. Pearson From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 1772 times:

I'm not too sure if that's really the case. I'm not too knowledgeable in this department, but would imagine an airline would operate a service even if one sector is below the break-even point. If the other, for instance return, sector is equally low, then perhaps the airline will not operate the service. However, if combined, the two sectors are at or above the break-even point, then perhaps they will operate it.

I'm sure however it doesn't operate like this. For example, if an airline has recently introduced a new service, a prime example was the then-new SOU-ZRH EM4-operated service, and is aware that initial loads will be low, will operate the flight regardless. The airline is anticipating a rise in passenger numbers, so this risk is perhaps justifyed in the long-term.

In conclusion, I think that, if an airline has a less-than-adequately demanded service, then the concerned airline will react accordingly. If, however, the airline has recently introduced a new and thus in reality seemingly unknown service, then it will continue as it visualises an increase in passenger traffic.


User currently offlineCeilidh From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1765 times:

Trek Airways - aka Luxavia - operated scheduled charters between JNB and LUX for many years that way - first with Constellations, then 707s, then A300s and finally B747SPs.

In part, it was to get around the IATA rules; and also it was in effect a sanctions busting operation as the aircraft were on the LX register despite blonging to SAA.

Luxembourg was one of the world's first countries to offer Open Skies, and South African pax could connect on Luxair flights as well as transatlantic services of Icelandair. Trek ceased airline operations in April 1994.

In the Caledonian Wings case, it's easier to get a charter licence than a scheduled one - and far faster!


User currently offlineFlashmeister From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 2900 posts, RR: 6
Reply 8, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 1757 times:
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Morris Air did this sort of thing before they were bought by WN - they were a "service" for a while, technically not a scheduled carrier, but they had scheduled charters. There are apparently big differences in how the FAA handles these carriers.

The FAA looked at Morris after they grew and told them that there was no way that Charter rules still applied, so Morris became a "regular" commercial scheduled carrier. Then, not long later, Southwest snapped them up.


User currently offlineCaribb From Canada, joined Nov 1999, 1637 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (13 years 7 months 3 weeks 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 1745 times:

In Canada Air Transat, Canada 3000 and Royal offer "scheduled" charters to the Caribbean, Europe and across North America. Canada 3000 & Royal have recently been given scheduled licences for some European services and in C3's case to Australia and India. Air Transat though does fly regularly across Canada and even advertises flights as if they were scheduled (ie: air only fares etc.). These carriers usually concentrate on the vacation markets (Florida, Hawaii, Caribbean (Dominican Rep., Cuba, Barbados) and Mexico... trans-Canada, & Europe (France, England, Holland, Italy & Spain.)

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