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Third And Final 787 "Crash Test" Planned For Today  
User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31004 posts, RR: 86
Posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3618 times:
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http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...space/2003849110_boeingtest23.html

Quote:
Boeing is set to perform a crash test today on its 787 Dreamliner — by dropping a section of the fuselage from the height of a second-story window.

Boeing has not done crash tests to get previous jets certified to fly. It's necessary this time because the 787 is the first airliner built largely out of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, which is more brittle and less shock-absorbent than metal.

(T)he test isn't designed to simulate a full-tilt fall to Earth. Rather, it replicates the vertical impact of an emergency landing in which the plane hits the ground harder than normal — often referred to as a crash landing.

Today's vertical drop will be Boeing's third and final crash test on the Dreamliner.

While none of these tests are "pass-fail", both previous tests matched the mathematical models Boeing used and were considered successful. Boeing officials expect this test to also match the models.

6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3582 times:

Quoting Stitch (Thread starter):
While none of these tests are "pass-fail", both previous tests matched the mathematical models Boeing used and were considered successful. Boeing officials expect this test to also match the models.

Yes, you're right. These tests will be used to verify FEA-models.


User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31004 posts, RR: 86
Reply 2, posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3551 times:
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Quoting 777236ER (Reply 1):
Yes, you're right. These tests will be used to verify FEA-models.

Yup.

And before somebody speaks up about using computer models instead of physical tests to certify the Dreamliner, FEM modeling has been used for a long time in many industries. And the A388's wing received certification when FEM showed that the additional strengthening Airbus would apply would make up the 3% needed to reach the 150% load before failure requirement.

Also, it is a given that the A350, as well as the 737RS and A320RS, will all be certified in a similar manner using extensive FEMing to the Dreamliner.


User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 9105 posts, RR: 75
Reply 3, posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3551 times:

Quoting Stitch (Thread starter):

Sorry, I also posted the article in the tech ops discussion we had about this recently....



We are addicted to our thoughts. We cannot change anything if we cannot change our thinking – Santosh Kalwar
User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 3475 times:

Quoting Stitch (Reply 2):
And before somebody speaks up about using computer models instead of physical tests to certify the Dreamliner, FEM modeling has been used for a long time in many industries. And the A388's wing received certification when FEM showed that the additional strengthening Airbus would apply would make up the 3% needed to reach the 150% load before failure requirement.

Also, it is a given that the A350, as well as the 737RS and A320RS, will all be certified in a similar manner using extensive FEMing to the Dreamliner.

It's a much better way of doing things. If you have verified finite element models you can get much closer to the physicality of what's going on, instead of just increasing the thickness/diameter of a part until it stops failing.

Then again, I'm not a structures engineer, thank god.


User currently offlineDAYflyer From United States of America, joined Sep 2004, 3807 posts, RR: 3
Reply 5, posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 3281 times:

Wow, droping airplanes from 20ft up. How cool is that?


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User currently offlineStitch From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 31004 posts, RR: 86
Reply 6, posted (7 years 1 month 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 3184 times:
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Quoting Zeke (Reply 3):
Sorry, I also posted the article in the tech ops discussion we had about this recently....

Ah. I was surprised nobody had posted about it before I opened my Seattle Times this morning.

For those interested, the thread can be found here - 787 Crashability (by Faro Aug 18 2007 in Tech Ops) and it has some good observations by a number of a.net members.

[Edited 2007-08-23 16:35:11]

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