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Future Of The Q-400?  
User currently offlineCRJ900X From Canada, joined Dec 2006, 197 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 12584 times:

Hey all,

What do you think will happen to future sales of the Q400 aircraft? Will current operators and future carriers (i.e Arik Air, Colgan, and Croatia Airlines) go through with current orders?

I know it's very early into the investigation of what's happened to the two SAS Q-400's, but I am just curious to know thoughts about the future of the Dash 8Q-400.

Cheers,

CRJ900X

79 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineKBFIspotter From United States of America, joined May 2005, 729 posts, RR: 1
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 18 hours ago) and read 12556 times:

Well, QX is staking their future on the aircraft. When they are not experiencing any mx issues, the Q400 are a very good aircraft, and can carry a good sized load. But the downside is that they are turning out to be very maintenance intensive.

Kris



Proud to be an A&P!!!
User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 23302 posts, RR: 20
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 12470 times:

What choice to carriers who need a new 70-ish seat prop have? Fair or not, I think there's still a fair bit of concern about icing and ATRs in this country (related to the MQ Roselawn crash), and that leaves the Q400 and... the Q400. In the U.S. at least, there will likely be more orders for that reason. The rest of the world, it would seem, isn't so ATR-phobic.


I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 17 hours ago) and read 12462 times:

Whats their options, Embraer and ATR surely have long delivery time for new airplanes and the 2nd hand market is limited since airplanes like SAAB2000 has been converted into military AWACS use.

User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6540 posts, RR: 54
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12312 times:

In my country I would assume that the future of Q400 is next to nil.

You know, here it is not just these two accidents within the last three days. For six years it has over and over again been a public discussion - also in the press - whether this plane is a "flying death trap" or just an immensely unreliable thing which much too often doesn't bring the customers from A to B within expected time frame.

Whether it is in reality a perfectly good plane, and all faults are with SAS mx, and everything gets fixed... It just doesn't matter. It has now gone way too far.

Also today SAS told that "we are looking at both short and long term fixes". That can hardly mean anything else but "Q400-exit" has been decided.

These latest developments just mean that passenger confidence went from "ten percent" to "minus a hundred percent".

For myself: I have enjoyed being a SAS customer hundreds of times, and flown on all SAS short/medium range planes all way from the CV-440 to the Airbus 321, Caravelle, F-27, F-50, B737, and of course every DC-9 related thing from the DC-9-20 to the MD-90. Except the Dash-8-Q400.

Every time there was chance that I could be on a Q400, then I found an alternative, another non-Q400 airline, changed shedule avoiding an otherwise possible non-stop flight, or I simply took my car. I don't think I was scared of the Q400. But due to the extensive negative press-coverage of that plane right from its introduction day one, seven years ago, then I knew that I would never feel comfortable on that plane.

And now: If I some day in the future see a Q400 at the gate, when I expected other equipment, then I will refuse to board, and they will have to retrieve my baggage. Even if that means that I will have to tear my ticket apart and buy a new one at another airline. Most pax won't act like this, most of them because they have no clue which plane type they are on. But we will be many, at least enough to be disturbing to Q400 ops.

But it won't happen. "Denmark, Q400 - exit".

What I fear mostly is that people will just "put all turboprops in one basket". That could damage our dear Cimber Air who for decades have performed perfect and very reliable service with their ATR-42/-72 fleet. BTW they were launch customer of the ATR-42 the same way as SAS was with the Q400. Former Cimber Air CEO, captain Ingolf Nielsen, even bragged that his personal ideas influenced the final design of the ATR in several ways.

He was a rather special personality. Even if he developed a quite large, regional airline, then he always kept his feet in the air, and let other people "fly the desk". There were Cimber Air flights where he was the PIC, his son was FO and his daughter was FA.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineBasefly From Denmark, joined Apr 2007, 209 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12263 times:

I wonder if there is an jet alternative to the Q400??.

Are there any airliners out there that can do what the Q400 does (That are available) ??



757/777-A340/A380, Love them.
User currently offlineDanny From Poland, joined Apr 2002, 3515 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12241 times:

Quoting Cubsrule (Reply 2):
I think there's still a fair bit of concern about icing and ATRs in this country

This isssue related to early ATRs and was resolved long time ago. ATRs has beed operated succesfuly in Finland for years so certainly they could be operated in the US as well.


User currently offline9252fly From Canada, joined Sep 2005, 1403 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12233 times:

SK experience with the Q400 and it's relationship with Bombardier have been peculiar since the aircraft was introduced. What I don't understand is why it seems primarily to be SK that has constantly had problems. Could it be that they were the one of the launch customers and they received early build lemons? There are many customers worldwide that are very satisfied with their Q400's,so it makes one wonder what the real issue is. QX for example is betting it's future on the Q400. I can't help feel there is more to this story. From a safety point of view,it would appear the only issue that crops up constantly are landing gear issues. That in itself hardly constitutes an aircraft that is a death trap,especially considering that pilots are getting warning indicators prior to departure on start-up in many cases and are cancelling the flights on the apron.

User currently offlineAlessandro From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12215 times:

Basefly, Embraer170 is one option, I´m sure LOT will gain on these problems.

User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2187 posts, RR: 9
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12177 times:

Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 4):
I would assume that the future of Q400 is next to nil.

The words "I would assume..." generally mean "I have no idea about..."

Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 4):
I don't think I was scared of the Q400. But due to the extensive negative press-coverage of that plane right from its introduction day one, seven years ago, then I knew that I would never feel comfortable on that plane.

It appears you are basing your fear (or discomfort) upon "negative press coverage". Is there anything more concrete you can point to that causes your concern? Perhaps a more tangible and accurate examination of the Dash 8-400 safety record may be in order.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8768 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12141 times:

Quoting Basefly (Reply 5):
I wonder if there is an jet alternative to the Q400??.

Absolutely, the CRJ-700, 705 and 900.

They burn a little more fuel, but they are also faster and are capable of 1000+ mile trips loaded.


User currently offlineAlias1024 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 2808 posts, RR: 2
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12100 times:

Quoting Alessandro (Reply 8):
Basefly, Embraer170 is one option, I?m sure LOT will gain on these problems.

How many hundreds of pounds of fuel extra will be burned on a one hour flight? The E-170 is about the same size, but can't compete with the economics of the Q400. Neither can the CRJ 700, 705, or 900.

Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 4):
If I some day in the future see a Q400 at the gate, when I expected other equipment, then I will refuse to board, and they will have to retrieve my baggage.

That's a bit of an overreaction. The Q400 is a great aircraft to fly on. I've flown on the Q400 at least a dozen times, and every flight arrived at the destination on time. Operators like Flybe and Horizon Air operate the airplane day in and day out, completing their schedule. It's odd that the world's two largest operators of the Q400 haven't experienced all these gear issues SAS has supposedly been having for the last several years. Makes one wonder if the problem is the Q400 or SAS.



It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2187 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12100 times:

Quoting Flighty (Reply 10):
Absolutely, the CRJ-700, 705 and 900.

But they can't operate into the same airstrips as the Dash now can they?



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineGr8Circle From Canada, joined Dec 2005, 3130 posts, RR: 4
Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 16 hours ago) and read 12066 times:

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 11):
It's odd that the world's two largest operators of the Q400 haven't experienced all these gear issues SAS has supposedly been having for the last several years. Makes one wonder if the problem is the Q400 or SAS.

I haven't heard of Porter having any problems either.....and they've been flying the Q400 for over 6 months now....


User currently offlineAlaska737 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 1063 posts, RR: 5
Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 12015 times:

I love the Q-400, I have flown on it a lot on QX and I will keep flying it, its far better than a Q-200 and more comfortable than a CRJ.

User currently offline777236ER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 15 hours ago) and read 11904 times:

Quoting Prebennorholm (Reply 4):
Whether it is in reality a perfectly good plane, and all faults are with SAS mx, and everything gets fixed... It just doesn't matter. It has now gone way too far.

Also today SAS told that "we are looking at both short and long term fixes". That can hardly mean anything else but "Q400-exit" has been decided.

These latest developments just mean that passenger confidence went from "ten percent" to "minus a hundred percent".

For myself: I have enjoyed being a SAS customer hundreds of times, and flown on all SAS short/medium range planes all way from the CV-440 to the Airbus 321, Caravelle, F-27, F-50, B737, and of course every DC-9 related thing from the DC-9-20 to the MD-90. Except the Dash-8-Q400.

Every time there was chance that I could be on a Q400, then I found an alternative, another non-Q400 airline, changed shedule avoiding an otherwise possible non-stop flight, or I simply took my car. I don't think I was scared of the Q400. But due to the extensive negative press-coverage of that plane right from its introduction day one, seven years ago, then I knew that I would never feel comfortable on that plane.

And now: If I some day in the future see a Q400 at the gate, when I expected other equipment, then I will refuse to board, and they will have to retrieve my baggage. Even if that means that I will have to tear my ticket apart and buy a new one at another airline. Most pax won't act like this, most of them because they have no clue which plane type they are on. But we will be many, at least enough to be disturbing to Q400 ops.

But it won't happen. "Denmark, Q400 - exit".

I don't understand this at all. You've been very anti-Q400 on here before, which makes me suspicious that you have an agenda other than simply refusing to fly on an unsafe aircraft.

Why wouldn't you fly on the -Q400, but would fly on the aircraft you've listed? Most of them are significantly older technology, with higher cycles. The 737 has had serious problems over its life, never forgetting the rudder issues and the slat bolt issue. F-27s crash all over the place, it has a huge w/o rate, the Fokker 50 is just a warmed up version of it. The ATRs have had serious icing problems etc.

A rudder hard over is much more serious than an unlocked landing gear. Furthermore the incidence of two right landing gear unlocked incidents in two days with the same type and the same airline suggests dodgy airline practices just as much as it does aircraft faults.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 26005 posts, RR: 22
Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 13 hours ago) and read 11782 times:

Quoting Flighty (Reply 10):
Quoting Basefly (Reply 5):
I wonder if there is an jet alternative to the Q400??.

Absolutely, the CRJ-700, 705 and 900.

They burn a little more fuel, but they are also faster and are capable of 1000+ mile trips loaded.

But the majority of routes operated by CRJs and other regional jets are much shorter than 1000 miles, and for anything up to 500 miles or so, turboprops are much more economical due to their lower fuel consumption, especially at current and projected fuel prices. That's why orders for both Bombardier and ATR turboprops have been up significantly over the past couple of years. There's also very little difference in block times vs. RJs, especially when comparing the Q400 which is significantly faster than the similar-size ATR-72.


User currently offlinePrebennorholm From Denmark, joined Mar 2000, 6540 posts, RR: 54
Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 11673 times:

Quoting 9252fly (Reply 7):
From a safety point of view,it would appear the only issue that crops up constantly are landing gear issues. That in itself hardly constitutes an aircraft that is a death trap,especially considering that pilots are getting warning indicators prior to departure on start-up in many cases and are cancelling the flights on the apron.

No, it is definitely not landing gear problems alone. In fact SAS told us Sunday night after the first crash that it was the FIRST landing gear problem they encountered on the Q400.

On the other hand the Danish CAA received sixteen problem reports from SAS from Feb to Jul this year.

The Q400 is said to have produced around fifty safety landings every year at CPH alone. Two of them on Monday, the day before yesterday, right between the two accidents 58 hours apart. None of those two safety landings were gear related.

The main problem with the Q400 in SK service is that it simply much, much too often doesn't bring the passenger from A to B in the expected time frame. Delays, re-routings, getting stranded, that's what has eroded passenger confidense to a minimum long time before the accidents happened. In this country those accidents are considered "only" the icing on the cake.

I did not say that it is a death trap. I reported that the public and the press over six years have discussed whether it is a death trap or just an extremely unreliable plane. No technical facts, the only fact being that that discussion has taken place.

Quoting 777236ER (Reply 15):
F-27s crash all over the place, it has a huge w/o rate, the Fokker 50 is just a warmed up version of it. The ATRs have had serious icing problems etc.

These days F-27s are flown into mountains by third world operators which are banned from EU air space. That has nothing with plane reliability to do. All those three types have done sterling service in this country with very fine dispatch rates, ATR still does in quite large numbers. Never heard about an icing problem on ATR in this country, never experienced a delay on an ATR flight. That's very modest statistics of course. The only fact I can tell is that ATR and Q400 in this country are considered placed at two different ends on the reliability scale.

Quoting 777236ER (Reply 15):
Why wouldn't you fly on the -Q400, but would fly on the aircraft you've listed?

Well, thinking in a rational way I wouldn't avoid the Q400 because I'm afraid of crashing. But two reasons:
1. When I travel, then it has a purpose and a time schedule. Arriving late or being stranded some strange place is a great inconvenience, to me, and to colleagues who rely on me doing my work.
2. When on a plane or a train or boat, I relax, read a book, work on the laptop or whatever. I couldn't do that on a Q400 because I would be constantly alert for sounds or vibrations which could indicate a problem. It's probably not rational, but that's how it is.

I have no idea where the faults are. If it's purely within SAS or something else. I only report the general feeling in this country, that after seven years this old story has now gone way too far, and if SAS wants to continue to be a significant airline, then they must rely to that in a way which their customers understand. How on earth that can be anything else but "Q400-exit", that's beyond my imagination.

But first the minister of transport will have to read all Q400 snag-reports from seven years of ops from the speaker's stand in the parliament. Then there is a whole bunch of politiciant stumbling over each other to make the Danish CAA monitor SAS Q400 ops AT LOT more closely.

You live in another country, and you look upon these technical issues as solveable technical problem, and that's of course exactly what they are.

But I live here in Denmark where it is a political problem, a customer confidense problem, a survival problem for an airline. It's an entirely different animal. You have to see it in that perspective, or you won't understand what I have written. I do not tell that it is rational that it is so, but that's the way it is.



Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs, Preben Norholm
User currently offlineFreshlove1 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 11 hours ago) and read 11643 times:

I believe the future will be ok for the Q400. No aircraft is perfect and unfortunatly along the way you will run into unforseen issues like we have here. I am sure they will go back to the drawing board and fix this issue so it does not continue to happen.

User currently offlineAeronut From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 138 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 11571 times:

Is there a future for the Q400, it is a successful part of many airlines fleets.I beleive when this problem is investigated, you'll discover there is a maintenance element to the two recent accidents and Bombardier and their suppliers will get to share the blame with SAS. Would I fly on a 400, I have and I will continue to. Will I fly on SAS, probably not. I get a kick out of all these discussions. Do you really think ATR (or any other manufacturer for that matter) is really any better than Bombardier? Not likely, all aircraft manufacturers go through these issues from time to time. Its not like the automobile industry, there are only (2) turboprop manufacturers!

It is obvious however that Q400 can now not be part of SAS fleet. Public perception has killed Q400 Scandanavia.


User currently offlineAleksandar From Serbia, joined Jul 2000, 3236 posts, RR: 32
Reply 20, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 11544 times:

The good thing for those Q400 incidents is that there were no fatalities. It gives future to the whole Q400 programme. Even if it is not the case, and airliner industry saw that too, too much money and effort was already invested not only by Bombardier, but by airlines as well. I already mentioned it in another post and I will do it again. Do you know what problems DC-10s had in late 1970s? Or 737 Classic after British Midland crash and few other incidents? Or not very promising start of A320?

At the moment, I really doubt SAS will get rid of its Q400 fleet. First, at this moment, I doubt they would find anyone they could sell those planes to. Second, do they have enough money to buy something else to replace Q400s (ATR-72s come to my mind).

As for other carriers, Austrian Arrows has a large fleet of Q300s and Q400s. Same as SAS. Luxair is very new user. Qantas Link, too. I don't know what is going on with Royal Jordanian fleet. Any news from them?

As for future users, the ones who have Q400s ordered, Croatia Airlines might pull out but not only because of recent problems with the planes, but because they already have ATRs.

Finally, somebody asked if there is a jet alternative to Q400s. In terms of capacity, of course there is. In terms of fuel consumption, the answer is no.



R-E-S-P-E-C-T
User currently offlineFarzan From Sweden, joined Jul 2007, 180 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 11528 times:

The Swedish news media menoronline today states that Bombardier has decided to stop the production of the Q400 until further notice. News media and aviation always make me sceptical especially as it also states that Bombarier has grounded all delivered Q 400's. I was not aware that they could even do that.

Sorry in Swedish only.

Produktion av olycksplan stoppas
2007-09-12


Bombardier har beslutat upphöra med tillverkningen av olycksdrabbade flygplanet Dash 8-400 tills vidare.

Flygplanet har varit inblandat i en rad incidenter, bland annat de som flyger åt SAS. Den senaste olyckan inträffade i Litauen, den liksom alla andra tillbud beror på att landningsstället brustit.

NU HAR DEN kanadensiska tillverkaren Bombardier bestämt att sluta tillverka planet och bolaget har belagt alla befintliga Dash 8-400 med flygförbud.

Flygplanstypen har två turbopropmotorer och används för matarflyg på korta distanser. Det fraktar främst passagerare men också lättare flygexpressgods.


User currently offlineACJAZZAME From Canada, joined Aug 2005, 47 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 11510 times:

[

Quoting 777236ER (Reply 15):
Why wouldn't you fly on the -Q400, but would fly on the aircraft you've listed? Most of them are significantly older technology, with higher cycles. The 737 has had serious problems over its life, never forgetting the rudder issues and the slat bolt issue. F-27s crash all over the place, it has a huge w/o rate, the Fokker 50 is just a warmed up version of it. The ATRs have had serious icing problems etc.

Couldn't say it better mayself.

Quoting Aeronut (Reply 19):

You are bang on with that.

I might put my neck on the chopping block to say this but it comes from good sources. SAS is the worst company to a launch customer. Thier MX unions are so strong that their maintenance workers can refuse to work on the Q400 if they want. I know that one Q400 came in with a sang to change some light bulbs that were burnt out and they refused to work on it for 3 days until the Bombardier rep replaced it himself. Their Maintenance dept has no interst on working on the Q400. Maybe the Q400 is too advanced for them.

Just remember there are always 2 sides to every story. There is no doubt that the Q400 is safe as are the other turboprops flying around. Furthermore don't compare RJs to turboprops. The ability to perform many cycles a day is far more demanding than the hours it flys.

I also remember one of the early SAS Q400s had it's tail damaged by a very hard landing. Maybe their pilots have some role to play in this??


User currently offlineStburke From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 96 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 11494 times:

I strongly believe the Q400 has proven itself, and still has even more to prove. With the start of F9's Lynx I look forward to flying on them, just wish they'd start flights to FAR or GFK.


aaaand it's gone.
User currently offlineAleksandar From Serbia, joined Jul 2000, 3236 posts, RR: 32
Reply 24, posted (7 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 9 hours ago) and read 11489 times:

Another Q400 operator announces flight cancellations for today. This time it is FlyBe which will cancel 30 flights today due to further inspections.

http://www.flybe.com/news/0709/13.htm



R-E-S-P-E-C-T
25 Post contains links Viscount724 : The aircraft manufacturer can only make recommendations. It's up to the government regulatory authorities of the countries where the aircraft are reg
26 Flighty : Sure, I agree with all that. Despite that, the CR9 continues to sell well... For 500 miles and less, the Q400 is the best tool for the job, no questi
27 Post contains images T prop : Ok, there's a clue to what the problem could be. It may be possible that the retract actuator jam nut is coming loose and changing the stroke length
28 F9Animal : We do not know the exact cause of the incidents involving the Q400. Let's wait till the investigation is complete. It could be a million things, inclu
29 Qantas787 : Qantas has temporarily grounded 7 of their 400's pending some work. I don't know why really, but there you go.
30 EK413 : With QantasSunstate operating a strong fleet of the Q400 type and placing an order for a further 2 to be delivered early next next I feel the Q400 has
31 Gilesdavies : I don't think the current issues with the Dash 8-Q400 is anything for Bombardier to be worried about... Many aircrafts have over their life span have
32 EK413 : correction next year EK413
33 Teme82 : Back here AY has been flying with ATR in the past and winter time, temps bellow -15 celsius. And no problems at all. And now FC uses ATR's in here.
34 BlueSky1976 : ATRs don't have icing problem anymore. The issue has been fixed looooong time ago.
35 Maersk737 : I have to agree a little with Prebennorholm. Every time I travel from AAL to CPH, I avoid the Q400 if it's possible, not because I'm afraid, but becau
36 EMA747 : In Scandinavia is it the Q400 that people are 'scared' of or is it the dash 8 in general? If it's just the Q400 could SAS not lease a few Dash 8-300s
37 Boeing77W : The Q400 is an excellent aircraft compared to other aircraft within the same size market. It's highly efficient, has a good range and can get into som
38 Post contains images BrianDromey : Yes, but they are also the most dramatic, from a media reporters standpoint. If I were a 'normal' traveller and a Q400 was at the gate, I would certa
39 Degenfly : Widerøe has flown Dash-8s for many years in Norway, and also have a few Q400s, and they've never been considered problem/unsafe-aircraft here. I dou
40 Post contains images Nwarooster : Remember the DC-10? Well it is still flying. Problems fixed.
41 JoeCanuck : I was about to post that very thing. There is a long list of plane crashes where people died and the planes continued to serve in airlines. Nobody di
42 Post contains images OHLHD : That is true. Economics are quite good on these aircrafts. Funny nobody mentioned LH. I hardly doubt they will replace them. As for OS they will keep
43 DYflyer : My thoughts too. Maybe SAS Norge can trade their F50s for some Q400 from SAS Danmark.
44 Post contains links and images OHLHD : NO I want to fly them next year. See here: SAS F-50 Routes (by OHLHD Sep 9 2007 in Aviation Polls & Prefs)
45 CPH757 : I agree with you on some of your analysis, but not your point. It has been spun here in Denmark as as big issue, but the truth is that the media have
46 Cainanuk : Where on earth did you hear that bit of nonsense? BE have exactly SIX airframes grounded. That's it! Get your facts straight before posting mate!
47 JoeCanuck : The media is interested in any story involving bad things happening to planes...it's always so DRAMATIC...the talking heads on the news get to make t
48 BAe146TOM : I hear flybe have grounded some of their Q400's is this true?
49 Qantas744ER : All blame is being put on the Q400 and we dont even know 100% what the cause was... Im sorry but SK may just have internal MX problems with the plane
50 Boeing77W : I was told by an FO, they had to carry out essential maintenance checks due to the recent accidents.
51 Post contains images OHLHD : Yes, 6 of them. OS is btw flying 2 birds with registration: OE-LGI and LGJ. They seem to be the younger ones. I guess it is because the SAS as well a
52 CPH757 : Exactly my point, or at least close to. There is no doubt that the one should be very critical to any information written by the media at this time,
53 Cubsrule : Y'all didn't read what I said very carefully. What I said (and I stand by it) is that there is still a concern about ATRs and icing in this country.
54 Rikkus67 : Although the incidents with the SAS Q400's have been serious, we must realize that the actual manufacturer of the landing gear assembly is not Bombard
55 Prebennorholm : Investigation board has released first info. It was corrosion which made a bolt get lose or fall off. Edit: Corroded threads. That such a degree of co
56 AirPacific747 : I agree... It seems a little paranoid to state something like that.. I would feel perfectly safe flying in the Q400!
57 Cainanuk : Yes, to 6 aircraft... Not the entire fleet. My money has always been on SAS MX on this issue as they seem to be the ones having the probs. BE seem to
58 Post contains images Pohakuloa : So what does an airline delaying a flight and re-routing a flight or aircraft have anything to do with the performance of a certain aircraft as oppos
59 RIXrat : Could you please pass on the text of that preliminary investigation board info, even if it is in Danish. I'm sure a lot of us are just dying to know
60 Prebennorholm : Agree Cainanuk. And I think there is a good chance that you are right on spot when you mention deicing as a contributing factor. Denmark probably has
61 Prebennorholm : I haven't found anything myself. I only heard it on the radio new 50 minutes ago.
62 Post contains links Prebennorholm : For those who read Danish: http://epn.dk/handel_service/transport_logistik/article1087224.ece I will bring translation later.
63 Prebennorholm : Danish Newspaper Jyllands-Posten: "Corrosion Caused Emergency Landing in Aalborg Danish CAA (SLV)will on Friday decide whether gounding of Q400 can be
64 RIXrat : Here is the preliminary statement from the Danish Accident Investigations Commission regarding the first landing gear failure at Aalborg, Denmark, and
65 Prebennorholm : No, that's correct - not wrong way around. It also puzzles me. Seven years of service with 29 planes, and rust isn't discovered until it makes a plan
66 DABZF : ... is the punctuality really so bad compared to other SK types? When living in CPH and later in ARN I took Q400 flights to BLL and to RIX and VNO ve
67 RIXrat : From the above preliminary report -- just speculation now -- could the pin have been made of stainless steel, but the holding ring/pin been made out o
68 LTU932 : Because LH doesn't operate themselves the Q-400, as they're all operated by IQ.
69 Tdscanuck : The blade wants to go forward...I think the row in front of the propeller plane is probably worse than the one directly even with the propeller. Tom.
70 Boeing77W : I was aware that there were already 6 aircraft out of service for checks, that's why they chartered two aircraft from Air South West to try and reduc
71 Aleksandar : Unfortunately, that's true. You can hardly ever find a valid and good article or report in mainline newspapers and TV channels. All they give is half
72 Cainanuk : The Air Southwest (of which there is only one, G-WOWD) was brought in before the grounding.
73 Aeronut : BINGO
74 Post contains links LTU932 : According to this article, IQ grounded three of them. http://www.airliners.de/safety/nachr...n/artikelseite.php?articleid=13063 (German only)
75 Aleksandar : Thanks. Now it only remains to be seen what is going on with RJ's Q400s. I checked their website yesterday and the departures to SSH, BEY and ALP wer
76 Post contains links and images Viscount724 : And going back another 20 years, some may recall the Lockheed L188 Electra which had far more serious problems than the Q400, with 2 fatal crashes 6
77 86J : So, which aircraft manufacturing company do you work for? Sheesh, you sound like the Sean Hannity of Aerospatiale or Embraer! I didn't know they allo
78 EMAlad : Which a/c have Flybe taken out of service?
79 Prebennorholm : As can be seen on the AAL accident plane the centrifugal force is so great that it goes straight in. Once inside the cabin prop blade parts may bounc
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