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The Airport Series Movies  
User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 2790 times:

Hello All,

Was just wondering....

I've seen all the airport series movies. I think there are 4 of them. The first one featured the Boeing 707, the second one featured the 747, the third featured another 747 in a hypothetical nonsensical situation, and the fourth featured the Concorde.

After watching these probably dozens of times, I wonder if Boeing had anything to do with these films, sort of a PR statement for their aircraft. You have all the "macho male" characters in the film talking about how great the 707 and 747 are. These quotes come to mind, "The 747 is the best aircraft in the skies. It can almost fly by itself." "Dad, you call the 747 the big pussy cat," "No son, it's a TOM CAT!" and many more others.

So did Boeing have anything to do with these movies sort of as a testament to the safety and electronic genius of the aircraft at the time?

Airport '79 was a little different with the Concorde. That thing seemed to want to fall out of the sky in some form or fashion during EVERY flight, and it eventually blows up in the end.

So what do you think? I love these movies. Especially in Airport '75 when Nancy takes control of the plane without any radio help and flies it over the mountain peak and turns to the right. Almost brought a tear to my eye. Only a plane lover would tear up at that moment. LOL. As far as plane movies, Airport '75 has some of the BEST shots of a 747 flying ever! They flew that thing with half-flaps the entire movie at low altitude and speed through the mountains.

Some of the humor I really didn't get though, and still to this day I don't. Like when the nerdy guy tells the woman who always orders "Bourbon, with a beer chaser....Jesus Christ the Boiler Maker" that she would like Salt Lake City, "Because it is very dry there..." "DRY??!?"

Or when the guy talks to the lady who's knitting and says, "Jeez, by the time you land will have a rug" and she looks at him strange.

The humor was a bit odd, but I'm guessing the humor was sort of 1970's colloquial humor. Not sure.

Of course, everyone remembers cross-eyed Karen Black and the "tongue" scene! LOL.

Anyway, what say you?

UAL

25 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMichlis From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 737 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2749 times:

Don't forget Captain Joe Patroni's (George Kennedy) comment when he moved a snow-bound 707...something to the effect of "...that's the thing about the 707, you talk to her just right and she'll do just about anything." (heavily paraphrased but memorable nonetheless.)


If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the outcome of a hundred battles.
User currently offlineBostonBeau From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 465 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2729 times:

If you have digital cable with "On Demand," the "Airport" movies are quite often featured in the "Free Movies" area. I think the original Airport and Airport 75 are on this month.

I thought the Concorde movie was the best, for inadvertently being funny: the Concorde is attacked by a missile 15 minutes after leaving Dulles airport, goes through all kinds of evasive maneuvers, and *still* continues on to Paris. Approaching Paris, it is now attacked by a fighter jet...shot at with missiles....more evasive maneuvers and depressurization...and after a quick check...Joe Patroni announces that they will be continuing on as planned to Moscow. Then, a device is placed on the plane to open the cargo door en route...they lose almost all fuel...and somehow manage to glide the plane to land in a snow field in the Alps near Munich (look at a map...a flight from Paris to Moscow goes no where near Munich). Then...the plane that was completely out of fuel....explodes...even though it was completely buried with snow and everyone had evacuated.


User currently offlineBcoz From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 372 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 2696 times:

Quoting Michlis (Reply 1):
.that's the thing about the 707, you talk to her just right and she'll do just about anything." (heavily paraphrased but memorable nonetheless.)

In the Devotion to Accuracy Department....

The mechanic sitting in the right hand seat says, "The instruction book said that was impossible."

To which Patroni replies, "Well, that's the nice thing about the 707... It can do everything but read."

Sorry... had to do it

bcoz

[Edited 2007-09-19 20:17:07]

User currently offlinePacNWjet From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 980 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2668 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
After watching these probably dozens of times, I wonder if Boeing had anything to do with these films, sort of a PR statement for their aircraft.

The original "Airport" movie (1970) was based on the best-selling 1968 novel of the same name by British-born author Arthur Hailey. Hailey was a pilot in the Royal Air Force during World War II. His knowledge of aviation formed the basis of his first novel Flight Into Danger (a.k.a. Runway Zero Eight) in 1958 as well as the novel Airport itself. Hailey's writing method was to spend months researching a topic to give his novels as much verisimilitude as possible. Hailey likely chose the Boeing 707 because it was one of the premier jet-powered aircraft of the time, although he probably could just have easily made the Douglas DC-8 the "protagonist" of the story.

As for the 1975 and 1977 remakes of "Airport," the writers/producers no doubt favored the 747 since it was the largest commercial passenger aircraft of the era. The writers/producers of the laughable "Airport '79" probably featured the Concorde aircraft given the then-misplaced hope that supersonic air travel would define the future of commercial passenger air travel.


User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 5, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 11 hours ago) and read 2647 times:

I'm not so sure of Boeing influence. That was a time with different standards about product placement and support.

The original book by Arthur Hailey - originally from Luton in the UK - includes some of the statements about the reliability and solidity of the 707. The book was a HUGE best seller and was quickly moved to the screen with some of the top box office draws of the day in lead roles. Yes Dean Martin really was a star who attracted thousands of fans.

It's a common movie plot device to try and humanize an inanimate object by giving it a personality and power.

When Airport came out the B707 was THE dominant long range aircraft in the world - yet the vast majority of the movie public had never seen one in person, much less flown. The two planes were important characters in the story development.

Remember also that the book and first movie were probably based upon a bomb explosion near the right rear lavatory on Continental Airlines Flt 11 in 1962 - a Boeing 707. That plane went down with the loss of all 45 on board. It was also the first known bombing of a commercial jet aircraft. Even the insurance policy plot in the movie follows the real world incident.

I remember the story about the bomb bringing down the plane, the release of Hailey's book and the movie release very clearly. The current publicity and interest in the A380 are a pale comparison to the news coverage and interest in those events.

I'm sure Douglas wanted nothing to do with a movie about an airliner with a bomb exploding and injuring and killing people - no matter how well the end result turned out.

When the second movie was in production - the B747 was new and exciting. The most distinctive aircraft in the skies.

That movie may well have required some references to the safety and reliability of the aircraft to gain the cooperation of American Airlines and Boeing in making the move.

The third and fourth movies were mainly cashing in on the previous success. While the first two tried to stay close the the real physical capabilities of the aircraft, the last two have "super planes".


User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2572 times:

Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 5):
That movie may well have required some references to the safety and reliability of the aircraft to gain the cooperation of American Airlines and Boeing in making the move.

IIRC, I think the 747 of "Columbia Airlines 409" was an ex-AA aircraft. Or was that aircraft in service at the time with AA? Anywhoo, they just painted the tail and painted blue over the red stripe of AA's livery. Isn't that aircraft carrying around the Space Shuttle now? Or is it with UPS? I can't remember.


Either way, you gotta admit that Airport 75, as quirky and campy as it was, had some BEAUTIFUL shots of the 747 in flight. Probably the BEST of any movie out there involving planes.

The "A380" in "Flight Plan" looked like it was made out of thick half-way carroded Iron, with a very weird interior. I wonder how much they spend on that A380 mockup interior?

UAL

[Edited 2007-09-19 23:54:34]

User currently offlineMtb555 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 102 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 2548 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 6):
Isn't that aircraft carrying around the Space Shuttle now? Or is it with UPS? I can't remember.

It is flying with UPS as N675UP.


User currently offlineAustinAirport From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 643 posts, RR: 1
Reply 8, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 7 hours ago) and read 2515 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
Airport '79 was a little different with the Concorde. That thing seemed to want to fall out of the sky in some form or fashion during EVERY flight, and it eventually blows up in the end.

Jesus tell me about it!!  Yeah sure

Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
Some of the humor I really didn't get though, and still to this day I don't. Like when the nerdy guy tells the woman who always orders "Bourbon, with a beer chaser....Jesus Christ the Boiler Maker" that she would like Salt Lake City, "Because it is very dry there..." "DRY??!?"

Yeah I didnt get that either. LOL
Garrett



Whoever said you can do anything you set your mind to has obviously never tried to slam a revolving door!!!
User currently offlineRwy04LGA From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 3176 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2470 times:

Patroni wore a TWA hat as part of a deal to use TWA cabin mock-ups. TWA used 707s instead of DC-8s, so that may have been part of the rationale. Of course, most viewers would never be able to tell the difference.


Just accept that some days, you're the pigeon, and other days the statue
User currently offlineAviateur From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 1360 posts, RR: 11
Reply 10, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 5 hours ago) and read 2451 times:

Quoting UAL747 (Reply 6):
Either way, you gotta admit that Airport 75, as quirky and campy as it was, had some BEAUTIFUL shots of the 747 in flight. Probably the BEST of any movie out there involving planes.

That's a good point. You're right.

Airport '75 was a decent movie in that the premise was at least plausible, and the executions wasn't too campy. Airport '77, on the other hand, was totally ridiculous. As was Airport '79 -- complete with amateurish special effects showing a Concorde being stopped by giant rubber bands.

Airport '77 comes to mind every time I hear the phrase "water landing." I wrote about the movie, and about the facts and fallacies of water landings, in this article....

http://www.salon.com/tech/col/smith/2004/03/19/askthepilot71/

- PS



Patrick Smith is an airline pilot, air travel columnist and author
User currently offlineEXAAUADL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2379 times:

"Airport 93" was the worst, when the Comjet CRJ had that big issue,

User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 2367 times:

Quote:
IIRC, I think the 747 of "Columbia Airlines 409" was an ex-AA aircraft. Or was that aircraft in service at the time with AA? Anywhoo, they just painted the tail and painted blue over the red stripe of AA's livery. Isn't that aircraft carrying around the Space Shuttle now? Or is it with UPS? I can't remember.

The 747-123 was actually loaned to the movie company by American Airlines. In the beautiful air-to-air shots, you can clearly see the registry of N9675. American was phasing them out of their fleet (several ended up with Pan Am), and I think this was one of the first. It was even loaned out to TMA of Lebanon and registered OD-AGM for a while in 1976 and 1977.

If you go to http://www.airfleets.net and type in the registration of either N9675 or N675UP, you will find that this graceful beauty is now retired and stored at Roswell as of 2005.

Quote:
As far as plane movies, Airport '75 has some of the BEST shots of a 747 flying ever! They flew that thing with half-flaps the entire movie at low altitude and speed through the mountains.

 checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark   checkmark 

Nothing has ever equalled it. Watch the movie by skipping the interior shots and just stick to the air-to-air cinematography.

Quote:
I thought the Concorde movie was the best, for inadvertently being funny: the Concorde is attacked by a missile 15 minutes after leaving Dulles airport, goes through all kinds of evasive maneuvers, and *still* continues on to Paris. Approaching Paris, it is now attacked by a fighter jet...shot at with missiles....more evasive maneuvers and depressurization...and after a quick check...Joe Patroni announces that they will be continuing on as planned to Moscow. Then, a device is placed on the plane to open the cargo door en route...they lose almost all fuel...and somehow manage to glide the plane to land in a snow field in the Alps near Munich (look at a map...a flight from Paris to Moscow goes no where near Munich). Then...the plane that was completely out of fuel....explodes...even though it was completely buried with snow and everyone had evacuated.

A couple of questions:

  • Wasn't there an overnight delay in Paris before continuing? As I recall, the French co-pilot set Patroni up with a hooker...they talked about their sons both being in med school...and I remember thinking, "hmmm...Joe's son was 10 in 1975 (one year older than I was at the time) and now four years later he's in med school...how did THAT happen?"

  • Was the Concorde taking a southerly route to Moscow because of weather?

  • Is Patchekoppel a real ski resort area?

  • Didn't the plane have a bit of fuel left in its tanks when it hit the snow? Unfortunately, we have seen that just a small bit of fuel vapor can cause a devastating explosion (TWA 800).

    Thanks for the trip down memory lane!!  cloudnine 



  • Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
    User currently offlineEMBQA From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 9364 posts, RR: 11
    Reply 13, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2347 times:

    Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):

    It had to do with the popularity of the aircraft at that time. When the first Airport came out the B707 was state of the art for long distance travel. When the second and third came out, the 747 was king... when that last came out in 1979 you could not turn on the TV and not see or hear about the Concorde.



    "It's not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog"
    User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
    Reply 14, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2320 times:

    Quoting UAL747 (Reply 6):
    I think the 747 of "Columbia Airlines 409" was an ex-AA aircraft. Or was that aircraft in service at the time with AA? Anywhoo, they just painted the tail and painted blue over the red stripe of AA's livery. Isn't that aircraft carrying around the Space Shuttle now? Or is it with UPS? I can't remember.

    It was 2 to 3 year old active AAL aircraft during the movie filming - and stayed active with AAL in pax service for a few years, then was converted to AAL freight service. Yes, it did go to UPS, but for the last two years has been stored at Roswell.


    User currently offlinePerspicax From United States of America, joined May 2004, 18 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 15, posted (7 years 3 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2314 times:

    Quoting UAL747 (Thread starter):
    Some of the humor I really didn't get though, and still to this day I don't. Like when the nerdy guy tells the woman who always orders "Bourbon, with a beer chaser....Jesus Christ the Boiler Maker" that she would like Salt Lake City, "Because it is very dry there..." "DRY??!?"

    "Dry" in this case refers to a city/county/state that does not allow the sell of alcohol. Sid Caesar was quoted as saying he never drank, whereas Myrna Loy enjoyed boilermakers (quaintly calling them "bourbon, with a beer chaser"); his character would think it was good to stop drinking, while her character would find the idea unpalatable.  Smile


    User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
    Reply 16, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2180 times:

    I wonder if the name "Columbia Airlines" came from District of Columbia. I find it odd that they named it Columbia Airlines in the movie. Everytime I played captain as a kid, I was always Captain Stacey, Columbia 409. Ahh, the memories!

    I don't remember how I stumbled onto the movie, but Airport 1975 was the first plane movie I remember seeing, even before Airplane. It had to be around 1985/86 because my grandparents had just returned from Europe and they gave me my first model airplane, which was a Landor Schemed British Airways 747-200. I also got a United 70's-80's colorscheme 747-200. When my grandparents went on BA on the Concorde they brought me back my first Concorde in the Landor BA scheme as well.

    When I used to watch Airport '75 I would always hold my plane up and do the turns with the plane on TV. In fact, I still have that VHS tape sitting next to my desk as I type LOL.

    There's also a great view of a NW Orient DC-10 (-40 i think?) sitting at the bar before the flight at Dulles.

    Then there's Gloria Swanson as herself...stating about her beauty, "Well, I just don't eat poisoned food! It's not healthy for anyone!" And god, the nuns, what's her face, from Pete's Dragon, singing that folk music on the plane to little Linda Blair....was that before or after her head spinned around in "Exorcist"?

    And is it just me, or does George Kennedy's bloodpressure look extremely high in all of these movies? I was just always waiting for him to have a heart attack!

    UAL


    User currently offlinePacNWJet From United States of America, joined Sep 2000, 980 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 17, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 2151 times:

    Quoting UAL747 (Reply 16):
    I wonder if the name "Columbia Airlines" came from District of Columbia. I find it odd that they named it Columbia Airlines in the movie.

    Universal Pictures, which released the movie, tried to palm it off on rival Columbia Pictures  devil 


    User currently offlineL1011Lover From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 989 posts, RR: 14
    Reply 18, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 2126 times:

    Quoting UAL747 (Reply 16):
    I wonder if the name "Columbia Airlines" came from District of Columbia. I find it odd that they named it Columbia Airlines in the movie. Everytime I played captain as a kid, I was always Captain Stacey, Columbia 409. Ahh, the memories!

    Well Columbia Airlines flight 409 called "The Red-eye Special" was a nonstop cross-country flight from Washington Dulles to Los Angeles... Dulles Airport serves the city of Washington D.C. - The "District of Columbia"! Obviously the crew was based at IAD... it was Columbia´s home-base, headquarters, hub (if you could call it a hub at all back in 1974/75) so I don´t find it odd or weird at all but rather quite comprehensible and logical that they called the fictive airline "Columbia Airlines". Also don´t forget that "Columbia" is an early poetic name for America in reference to Christopher Columbus. I always liked the name and especially that airline's logo on the tail! Definitely a lot better than AALTO Airlines in "Flightplan"! Well my personal theory was that AALTO would stand for "American Air Lines Trans Oceanic"   Maybe Oceanic Airlines (Executive Decision) merged with TransCon Airlines (Turbulence) to create the new mega carrier AALTO!!!  

    Best regards

    L1011Lover

    [Edited 2007-09-21 02:05:01]

    User currently offline777gk From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1641 posts, RR: 18
    Reply 19, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 2059 times:

    Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 12):
    #


    # Is Patchekoppel a real ski resort area?

    Patscherkofel is a real (beautiful) ski area near Innsbruck in Austria.

    Quoting UAL747 (Reply 16):

    And is it just me, or does George Kennedy's bloodpressure look extremely high in all of these movies? I was just always waiting for him to have a heart attack!

    I always noticed this as well. Hell, I can't believe the guy is still around. Even more unbelievable is his interesting career path through the series, from hotshot mechanic in 1970, to airline VP in 1975, to who-knows-what his title was in '77, and finally as a Concorde captain in 1979. I know a lot of people that say the '70s were a hell of a ride, myself included, but Joe Patroni's run really takes the cake!


    User currently offlinePhllax From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 447 posts, RR: 0
    Reply 20, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2044 times:

    Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 12):
    A couple of questions:


    Wasn't there an overnight delay in Paris before continuing? As I recall, the French co-pilot set Patroni up with a hooker...they talked about their sons both being in med school...and I remember thinking, "hmmm...Joe's son was 10 in 1975 (one year older than I was at the time) and now four years later he's in med school...how did THAT happen?"

    Didn't the plane have a bit of fuel left in its tanks when it hit the snow? Unfortunately, we have seen that just a small bit of fuel vapor can cause a devastating explosion (TWA 800).

    There was an overnight stop in Paris after the leg from IAD.

    The plane exploded due to a bomb being onboard. The premise was to have the cargo door open mid-flight and then have the bomb go off shortly after to make it look like structural failure.


    User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
    Reply 21, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2030 times:

    Quoting Phllax (Reply 20):
    The plane exploded due to a bomb being onboard. The premise was to have the cargo door open mid-flight and then have the bomb go off shortly after to make it look like structural failure.

    Are you sure there was a bomb on board? As I recall, and it's been a while since I've seen this movie, it was just structural failiure due to a cargo hatch automatically opening itself during supersonic flight. If I remember correctly, the airline was called "Federation World Airlines" and the owner of the airline was on the flight. During cruise the plane started "stretching" and it showed the carpet tearing as the cargo door opened.

    BTW, is that a fictitious cargo door? Does it really have a code?

    And that missile thing that went after it, it was because the guy who owned the aerospace company was in hot water and his girlfriend journalist had the documents with her that would send him to jail that she was going to make public. Remember her recording her voice on the flight as the plane took a plunge down into the Atlantic as all four engines somehow shut down and had to be restarted 1 by 1?

    She was like, "OH MY GOD, WE'RE FALLING, WE'RE GOING TO HIT THE OCEAN"

    Then the plane magically pulls up seconds from disaster.

    There was also another plot going on where that black woman was taking a human heart on board the Concorde to her son for transplant I believe and it kept trying to fall out of the "refigerator" it was in.

    UAL


    User currently offlineAustinAirport From United States of America, joined Feb 2007, 643 posts, RR: 1
    Reply 22, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2011 times:

    Quoting Aviateur (Reply 10):
    As was Airport '79 -- complete with amateurish special effects showing a Concorde being stopped by giant rubber bands.

    I hate that part it looks so fuckin' fake.

    Quoting EXAAUADL (Reply 11):
    "Airport 93" was the worst, when the Comjet CRJ had that big issue,

    Never Seen it.

    Quoting Perspicax (Reply 15):
    "Dry" in this case refers to a city/county/state that does not allow the sell of alcohol. Sid Caesar was quoted as saying he never drank, whereas Myrna Loy enjoyed boilermakers (quaintly calling them "bourbon, with a beer chaser"); his character would think it was good to stop drinking, while her character would find the idea unpalatable.

    Ohhhh that makes sense. LOL

    Quoting L1011Lover (Reply 18):
    (Turbulence)

    Speaking of Turbulence, i saw that on TBS and LOVED it. I thought most it was pretty fake but whatever.



    Whoever said you can do anything you set your mind to has obviously never tried to slam a revolving door!!!
    User currently offlineF9fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 703 posts, RR: 3
    Reply 23, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 3 hours ago) and read 2005 times:

    The original "Airport" movie pretty much started the whole disaster genre, giving us such classics as "The Poseidon Adventure," "Earthquake," and "Towering Inferno," not to mention the sequels mentioned here. After the commercial disaster of "Airport '79," the whole genre died out until "Executive Decision," which was, IMHO, a horrible movie ("Airport '79" was a lot more plausible), but a commercial success. Now, thanks to the advances in special effects, we have been treated to a rebirth of the disaster movie genre thanks to movies such as "Daylight," "Independence Day," and "Poseidon."

    User currently offlineUAL747 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
    Reply 24, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 1992 times:

    Quoting F9fan (Reply 23):
    The original "Airport" movie pretty much started the whole disaster genre, giving us such classics as "The Poseidon Adventure," "Earthquake," and "Towering Inferno," not to mention the sequels mentioned here.

    You are right, in the 80's it was mostly science fiction adventure movies, with the likes of Steven Speilberg. Not to mention that the cold war had a big influence on our "space age" attitude back then.

    UAL


    User currently offlineL-188 From United States of America, joined Jul 1999, 29836 posts, RR: 58
    Reply 25, posted (7 years 3 months 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 1969 times:

    Quoting 777gk (Reply 19):
    Hell, I can't believe the guy is still around

    George Kennedy was also a licensed pilot, I don't know if he still has his medical or not.

    Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 12):
    Quote:
    IIRC, I think the 747 of "Columbia Airlines 409" was an ex-AA aircraft. Or was that aircraft in service at the time with AA? Anywhoo, they just painted the tail and painted blue over the red stripe of AA's livery. Isn't that aircraft carrying around the Space Shuttle now? Or is it with UPS? I can't remember.

    The 747-123 was actually loaned to the movie company by American Airlines. In the beautiful air-to-air shots, you can clearly see the registry of N9675. American was phasing them out of their fleet (several ended up with Pan Am), and I think this was one of the first. It was even loaned out to TMA of Lebanon and registered OD-AGM for a while in 1976 and 1977.

    The 707's in the original movie where provided by Flying Tigers. The final sceen where they intentially ground loop wasn't in the original script, the pilot operating the aircraft during the filming actually lost braking action and had to groundloop it to keep it out of the approach lights.



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