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Is It Airbus, Airbi, Airbuss Or Airbusses?  
User currently offlineOzTech From Australia, joined Feb 2007, 161 posts, RR: 0
Posted (7 years 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7747 times:

Well, what is the correct plural for Airbus????

Let's assume that the aforementioned object is "male" (Latin) to narrow the argument ok...
The Boeing plural is an easy one so let's not even go there ok... (Go there = American colloquialism = One of the Hilton sisters)
Your thoughts from my learned aerophiles please,


No defect too big, no defect too small, nothing in the log --- No defect at all !!
85 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineDvincent From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1745 posts, RR: 11
Reply 1, posted (7 years 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7746 times:
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A regular bus is "Buses" in plural. Airbuses is correct.


From the Mind of Minolta
User currently offlineZkpilot From New Zealand, joined Mar 2006, 4840 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (7 years 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7740 times:

Quoting Dvincent (Reply 1):
A regular bus is "Buses" in plural. Airbuses is correct.

  
However, Airbus is a name so in theory it could be Airbus's depending on what you are talking about... ie "It is Airbus's goal to beat Boeing" but "there are two Airbuses over there".

[Edited 2007-10-19 08:13:12]


56 types. 38 countries. 24 airlines.
User currently offlineCygnusChicago From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 758 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (7 years 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7710 times:

Quoting Dvincent (Reply 1):
A regular bus is "Buses" in plural. Airbuses is correct.

Hmmm, could've sworn that I read that the Chicago Transit Authority was ordering some new bi  Wink



If you cannot do the math, your opinion means squat!
User currently offlineA520 From Switzerland, joined Jun 2006, 122 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (7 years 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 7670 times:

Quoting Dvincent (Reply 1):
A regular bus is "Buses" in plural. Airbuses is correct.

It depends in which language.

In French the plural of bus is bus. So it should be Airbus!

Not sure about German, Spannish or other languages though.


User currently offlineBoeing747_600 From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 1295 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (7 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 7626 times:

It is in general incorrect to say either Boeings or Airbuses to indicate the plural of the type. The correct usage would be Boeing aircraft or airbus aircraft (note that aircraft is its own plural)

Examples:

I saw five Airbus aircraft parked on the ramp at JFK

Four Boeing aircraft took off from CDG within a few minutes of each other.


User currently offlineAeroMexico777 From Mexico, joined Oct 2005, 172 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (7 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 7626 times:

HI

In spanish would be:

Airbuses (Like aerobuses)

Regards, AeroMexico777



"When the hope of dying becomes the only reason to live..." Die Laughing (Gothic), Safe little world.
User currently offlineYOWza From Canada, joined Jul 2005, 4900 posts, RR: 15
Reply 7, posted (7 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 7584 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 2):
However, Airbus is a name so in theory it could be Airbus's depending on what you are talking about... ie "It is Airbus's goal to beat Boeing" but "there are two Airbuses over there".

Spot on. There is no need to try force Latin where it does not belong. In my experience only obnoxious, pretentious wankers do this.

YOWza



12A whenever possible.
User currently offlineFlySSC From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 7415 posts, RR: 57
Reply 8, posted (7 years 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 7573 times:

1 Airbus
2 Airbus
3 Airbus
4 Airbus
.
.
.
.
.
.
12596 Airbus.


User currently offlineCygnusChicago From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 758 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7525 times:

Well, since "Airbus" is the brand, there is not really a plural. The correct would be "Airbus aircraft", or "Airbus airplanes".


If you cannot do the math, your opinion means squat!
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 10, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7513 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 2):
However, Airbus is a name so in theory it could be Airbus's depending on what you are talking about... ie "It is Airbus's goal to beat Boeing" but "there are two Airbuses over there".

The question is about plurals - no place for apostrophes here.

Quoting Dvincent (Reply 1):
Airbuses is correct.

 checkmark 



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineDvincent From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1745 posts, RR: 11
Reply 11, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7486 times:
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I should clarify my comment; in that what I'm saying is from the perspective of a Northeast American English speaker. The point about Airbus as a brand probably stands and "Airbus Aircraft" is probably correct. However, we say "The Boeing is over there" or "The Airbus is landing." These are all proper and correct in their context. I tend not to use the manufacturer names in reference to the aircraft as much as possible - I tend to say "The 747s are landing next." I only use the manufacturer names when I don't know the specific type.

After all, it's perfectly fine for me to say "There's a line of Pontiacs over there" when I see a bunch of Pontaic cars lined up. It's perfectly valid.

As far as "It is Airbus' goal to beat Boeing" the posessive of an S does not need another S after the apostrophe. IE, The Princess' glass slipper is in that house. But that's off a different topic completely.



From the Mind of Minolta
User currently offlineUSADreamliner From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7452 times:

Quoting AeroMexico777 (Reply 6):
In spanish would be:

Airbuses (Like aerobuses)

Disagree with you.

"Cinco Airbus" is correct. NOT "Cinco Airbuses".


User currently offlineMasseyBrown From United States of America, joined Dec 2002, 5497 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7427 times:

Quoting RussianJet (Reply 10):
The question is about plurals - no place for apostrophes here.

Apostrophes are correct with single letters or acronyms. Examples: There are two t's in letter. The flight crew included three FA's.



I love long German words like 'Freundschaftsbezeigungen'.
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 14, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7393 times:

Quoting MasseyBrown (Reply 13):
Apostrophes are correct with single letters or acronyms. Examples: There are two t's in letter. The flight crew included three FA's.


Yes, but not with Airbus - which, correct me if I'm wrong, this thread is about.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineBrianDromey From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 3922 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7368 times:

Quoting Zkpilot (Reply 2):
Airbus is a name so in theory it could be Airbus's depending on what you are talking about...

I think it would be Airbus' surely?

What I am far more confused by is the name of the aircraft itself is it:

Airbus A320 or Airbus 320, what do Airbus aircraft have on the certification documents?

Assuming the A is a shortened form of "Airbus" do we really want to say, "Airbus, AirbusA320", as in "Airbus 320, manufactured by Airbus" i.e. if Embraer ever manufactured the A320 would the we call it the "Embraer A320" as in "the Airbus 320, manufacturered by Embraer" ?

Cheers,
Brian.



Next flights: MAN-ORK-LHR(EI)-MAN(BD); MAN-LHR(BD)-ORK (EI); DUB-ZRH-LAX (LX) LAX-YYZ (AC) YYZ-YHZ-LHR(AC)-DUB(BD)
User currently offlineBirdbrainz From United States of America, joined May 2005, 468 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (7 years 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 7342 times:

Quoting A520 (Reply 4):
In French the plural of bus is bus. So it should be Airbus!

Only if you're writing in French. If you're writing in English, it should be "I saw three Airbuses and five Boeings parked at Terminal E."

Btw, saying "Airbuses" and "Boeings" is just as correct as saying, for instance, "There were three Volkswagons, two Porsches, and five Ferraris parked in front of the store." I don't think anyone would dispute that sentence. Oh wait, I'm on A.net, where everything (including whether a tire is round or not) is disputed.
 duck 



A good landing is one you can walk away from. A great landing is if the aircraft can be flown again.
User currently offlineUSADreamliner From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (7 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 7278 times:

Airbus is a name, a brand.

you can say: I saw five airplanes. But, no need to say : I saw five Airbuses. Just say: I saw five Airbus.


User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25419 posts, RR: 86
Reply 18, posted (7 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 7266 times:
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Quoting YOWza (Reply 7):
There is no need to try force Latin where it does not belong. In my experience only obnoxious, pretentious wankers do this.

Or people with a sense of humor.  Smile

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineRussianJet From Belgium, joined Jul 2007, 7714 posts, RR: 21
Reply 19, posted (7 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 7266 times:

Quoting USADreamliner (Reply 17):
Airbus is a name, a brand.

you can say: I saw five airplanes. But, no need to say : I saw five Airbuses. Just say: I saw five Airbus.

What, so you would say "there are six Ford in that garage?" Of course not, you'd say there were six Fords.



✈ Every strike of the hammer is a blow against the enemy. ✈
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27118 posts, RR: 60
Reply 20, posted (7 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 7248 times:

Quoting BrianDromey (Reply 15):
I think it would be Airbus' surely?

What I am far more confused by is the name of the aircraft itself is it:

Airbus A320 or Airbus 320, what do Airbus aircraft have on the certification documents?

LOl... I would say Airbus.

They bought 29 Airbus A340's

They bought 29 Airbus aircraft.


User currently offlineSEPilot From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 6960 posts, RR: 46
Reply 21, posted (7 years 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 7223 times:

Why not make it Airbeese (as in geese)? After all, why be constrained by precedent?


The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
User currently offlineMadameConcorde From San Marino, joined Feb 2007, 10906 posts, RR: 37
Reply 22, posted (7 years 6 days 12 hours ago) and read 7108 times:

Is It Airbus, Airbi, Airbuss Or Airbusses?

I had a good laugh with this one!! Or is the plural Airbii?  Big grin

Makes me think of Olympus. Should we say 4 Olympus engines (as on Concorde) or 4 Olympii?

What is the plural in Latin (grammatically speaking)?



There was a better way to fly it was called Concorde
User currently offlineSpeedyGonzales From Norway, joined Sep 2007, 733 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (7 years 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 6995 times:

Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 22):
What is the plural in Latin (grammatically speaking)?

The latin plural would be Airbi/Olympi. Airbii would be the plural of Airbius.



Las Malvinas son Argentinas
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 25419 posts, RR: 86
Reply 24, posted (7 years 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 6986 times:
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Quoting MadameConcorde (Reply 22):
What is the plural in Latin (grammatically speaking)?

Oh, Madame, that's the can of worms that started the joke.

Generally, Latin nouns ending in "us" take "I" as the plural. So there is one hippopotamus, but two hippopotami.

So some people claim that the true plural of "omnibus" should be "omnibi" - others say it isn't, because "omnibus" is already a plural (it involves verbs used as nouns and the dative case ).

Anyhoo, a couple of language experts, playing language games, wondered if Airbi is the plural for Airbus. They decided it wasn't, but others took it more seriously.

Despite the "us" ending, "Airbus" is not a Latin word - it is an invented name - so the Latin rules don't apply. But language people play games all the time.

Example: "Guy" means literally, men, but somehow it has become generic and now applies to women as well, as in "you guys".

But that raises the question: if a woman's a guy what's a doll? And should the Broadway musical be renamed "Guys and Guys", which would give it a whole other meaning.  Smile

mariner



aeternum nauta
25 Post contains images RussianJet : Because that would just be silly
26 Post contains images OHLHD : Good questions. I always use Airbus not Airbusses since it is the manufactures name and not actually a " bus ". So one should actually say 3 Airbus a
27 Tdscanuck : Officially, even in North American English, you shouldn't plural it at all. Airbus as a noun refers to the company, of which there is only one so the
28 BrianDromey : Finally! A clear answer, it has been bugging me for a bit! I guess we could have an Embraer A320 then! Cheers, Brian.
29 Carls : You are right. Because Airbus is not the subject, it is the brand, so the plural should be Airbus Airplanes. Technically: In Spanish Cinco es plural,
30 Post contains images Wukka : Negative. Aircraft is one of those words in the English language that is both singular and plural. There is no such word as "aircrafts"; therefore it
31 Post contains images OHLHD : You learn something new everyday. I did not know that actually. Thanks for that.
32 Post contains images Lrdc9 : You could say: See the planes over there; all 3 three are airbus A318s. I like these ideas more though. Sometimes I say airbii like, 'I'm thinking Ai
33 Post contains images Jerald01 : I can see the news flash now: "Two Airbus Airbusii Collide In The Sky! Two Airbus Airbuses collided in the sky over the city today, with large pieces
34 Tdscanuck : If the plural of cactus is cacti, shouldn't the plural of bus be bi? And here we go down the rabbit hole... Tom.
35 NEMA : In reality, the French dont really have a say in anything, well being a True Brit thats my thoughts. Neither is anyone else Yep, my first thoughts to
36 TCFC424 : This is a fun thread, thank you, OP. I realize what everyone here has said already, about Airbus being a brand (noun) and all of that. I also know as
37 Post contains images AirframeAS : Here in the states, we call it 'Scarebus'.   [Edited 2007-10-19 22:54:21]
38 Post contains images Rampart : It's tyre, being originally an English word, and tyres may or may not be round, depending on how you are driving. -Rampart
39 Post contains images MadameConcorde : I like Scarebus. Thinking I will be on a Scarebus inaugural next week! This is a fun thread!
40 BA1978 : Ford, just like Boeing and Airbus is a brand and therefore there is no plural, we only have one Airbus, like we only have one Coca-Cola. When there i
41 NEMA : Nah, i aint having that... you would say that theres a Ford in that garage oh and by the way, there are five more too.
42 David L : It's not entirely invented, though. It comes from "bus", which itself comes from the Latin "omnibus", meaning "for everyone". So it comes from Latin
43 Post contains images Farrhad : i agree since airbus is French it should be Airbus Airbusses also does not sound wrong.......................
44 Breiz : It is maybe time to remind that Airbus ASA is formally a Dutch company, and that due to its shareholders and assembly plants, it is really an Europea
45 SEPilot : And you have a problem with that?
46 RussianJet : "How many cokes did you want?" Asked the barmen. No I wouldn't. ....no, but you have the wrong spelling - it's Airbuses.
47 Post contains images RussianJet : Naturally I do! I would never say or write anything silly!
48 Jamincan : Of course, the big 'but' here is the fact that you're talking about the English language, which shirks convention at every opportunity. While there a
49 Post contains images Door5Right : It is Boeing - never Airbus!
50 Airtrainer : I agree, it's a brand so there's no plural, like for a family name. So two Airbus, two Boeing, two Porsche, two Aston Martin, two Fiat............
51 Post contains images RICARIZA : Hmm, let's see: Airbus, Boeing, Embraer, etc. are brands (I agree with "USADreamliner") , I think we could all agree on that. And if that is the case,
52 Ba1978 : My point exactly, language evolves into slang. Coke is an adaption of the company brand to make a new word, it doesn't mean to say it's grammatically
53 ANother : buss (with 2 esses) is a kiss. So an Airbuss is a air-kiss (trois foix a Geneve, quatre fois a Paris!). In Vancouver, on the Granville St. bridge, th
54 Sxmna : In dutch is 1 bus -- 2 bussen hence Airbussen.
55 Post contains images SEPilot : I feel sorry for you-you must lead a very dull existence, then.
56 Post contains images Mariner : I love that. And I note that no one has questioned the plural (in English) of octopus (not Latin), but by which we could arrives at Airbopodes.   ma
58 SpeedyGonzales : Airbusen would be 'the Airbus' (definite singular) in Norwegian.
59 BrianDromey : But Airbus is not bloody French, or at least it did not start out that way....It was an integrated alliance of aircraft manufacturers from the UK, Ge
60 N53614 : Nope. "FA" is an abbreviation for "Flight Attendant". "FA's" would only be correct if you were referring to a possessive, like the FA's work schedule
61 Tdscanuck : FA is an acronym...first letters of "Flight" and "Attendant". As noted by MasseyBrown in Reply 13, it's proper to use apostrophes to denote the plura
62 RICARIZA : You are absolutely right on that...
63 IADCA : The problem is that "Airbus" is manifestly not a French word. The words "air" and "bus" are the same in both English and French, so let's assume we'r
64 N53614 : "Flight attendant's" is not OK when referring to more than one flight attendant. MasseyBrown is wrong.
65 David L : Um... Airbodes, surely?
66 Post contains images Oldeuropean : In German the plural of "Bus" are "Buse", so here it's "Airbuse". In English it's simply "Airbuses"! What? Are you sure? Don't let this hear the Germa
67 Asturias : Hm in Spanish I would say 'Los Airbus' for plural. saludos Asturias
68 Cedars747 : Un Airbus,deux Airbus,troix Airbus ect........................ Alex!!!
69 Asturias : You are right, that Airbus is not French any more than English or German. It is a convenient name that is easy to spell and pronounce in most Europea
70 Cedars747 : But i guess in Spanish it should be Aerobus and los Aerobuses for plural...si o no ? Alex!!!
71 Asturias : Bueno, es 'dos autobuses' p.ej., pero Airbus es un nombre propio. So yeah, aerobús and aerobuses - but as a brand I'd say 'dos Aerobús' . Like I wo
72 Cedars747 : I totally agree with Asturias .Un Mercedes, dos Mercedes ect......so one Airbus ,two Airbus would be right Saludos Alex!!!
73 Breiz : No, the Airbus word is not "bloody French" (thanks Brian). It is actually German. It was coined in '65 by German industrialists who wanted to look in
74 Post contains images MadameConcorde : I have decided on "one Airbus two Airbii" not that it is right (I know it isn't) but just for the fun of it.
75 Gbfra : Don't know about English, but this would be correct in German. Yes, "Airbus" is of German origin, although it isn't really a German word. ("Air" isn'
76 Post contains images David L : Then the singular would have to be Airbius. Otherwise, where did the second "i" come from? People make the same mistake with the bogus plural of "vir
77 Post contains images MadameConcorde : Oh I know it is not right... I have had my share of years of Latin in school. It's only because I find Airbii very funny!
78 Post contains images Toast : I always say 'Airbuses'. The fact that it's a brand doesn't prevent from forming a plural. Five Fords, five IBMs, five Parkers, five Airbuses. Other l
79 Alphascan : I second that! Now that you have pointed that out, from now on I'm saying, "Toyoti" using the same "for the fun of it" principle.
80 Tdscanuck : All four of those are incorrect grammer. You can't properly plural a brand (in English, anway). The fact that we do all the time doesn't make it righ
81 Post contains images Toast : If people do this all the time, it becomes standard grammar. Language evolves. This particular case is so widespread (dare I say, 99% of people do it
82 Jamincan : As far as I know, there is no such thing as an Académie Anglaise, so people can happily go about doing whatever the hell they want and it is just as
83 Post contains images David L : Ah, fair enough. Just checking.
84 Birdbrainz : Depends on which side of the pond you're on. Over there, it's tyre. Over here, it's tire. One is no better than the other, and I'd never tell anyone
85 Post contains images MadameConcorde : This is pretty good too! I would never have thougth of it!
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