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What Aircraft Is This - Mexicana  
User currently offlineBrissie_lions From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 5 hours ago) and read 1810 times:

I got this card the other day from Mexico. From the reverse of the card I am able to date it to the early-mid 1920s. However, I don't know what type of aircraft it is. I think it is either a Ford or a Fokker aircraft.

Can someone please verify for me, what aircraft it is, and also what dates this aircraft was operated by Mexicana de Aviacion.

Cheers

Scotty



5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineStarship From South Africa, joined Nov 1999, 1098 posts, RR: 14
Reply 1, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1737 times:

Scotty, your picture is not downloading and I was unable to access it at geocities either. It is probably too big - perhaps you didn't resize it during the scanning process?

Anyway, some research in the Mexicana website produced the following.

During the early 1920s, Compañia Mexicana de Transportacion Aerea (CMTA) operated 10 Lincoln Standard biplanes on the Mexico City to Tampico route via Tuxpan.

In 1924 CMTA became CMA and two years later in 1926 George Rihl went into partnership with Sherman Fairchild and together they bought four metal-bodied single-engine Fairchilds with space for four passengers, and the first airmail contract over the same route.



In 1929, after PanAm bought CMA for $150,000, the company began its first international flights to Brownsville and Guatemala City with Ford three-engine planes. In these, 13 passengers were served by a single flight attendant. The first trip between Brownsville and Mexico City was commanded by the famed pilot Charles A. Lindbergh. During the thirties, flights were opened to the capitals of El Salvador, Costa Rica and Cuba, as well as to Los Angeles, where it was the first foreign airline to have flights further than the border area.

CMA gradually expanded its operations at the same time as it acquired more modern aircraft such as Douglas DC-2, DC-3, DC-4, DC-6 and DC-7. This eventually led to the jet age in Mexico.

So perhaps the aircraft you are referring to is either a Lincoln Standard Biplane (if it was early twenties) or a Fairchild (mid twenties) or a Ford Tri-motor (late twenties). Without a picture it's a bit difficult to tell!




Behind every "no" is a "yes"
User currently offlineRojo From Spain, joined Sep 2000, 2443 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1715 times:

The aircraft on the picture is a Fairchild 71 / Fairchild FC-2, with one Pratt & Whitney Wasp engine (520 hp). Two Pilots and 6 passengers could travel on it.

CMA Compañía Mexicana de Aviacion operated 4 Fairchild FC-2 and 7 Fairchild 71 in 1926 because Sehrman M Fairchild adquired a 20% stake in CMA.

Hope this info helps!

Rojo


User currently offlineBrissie_lions From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 1702 times:

Starship

Here is the direct link

http://www.geocities.com/brissie_lions/mex.jpg

Mexicana's website was the first place I looked actually. Not a very detailed history they provide there unfortunately.

Rojo

Thanks for your help there.

Can I just ask a quick question. What is the significance of Anahuac? I think it is a place in Mexico right? Would Mexicana have actually named their aircraft way back then?

Cheers

Scotty


User currently offlineStarship From South Africa, joined Nov 1999, 1098 posts, RR: 14
Reply 4, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 1692 times:

Anáhuac is a place in Mexico, situated south west of the city of Chihuahua.

I finally got your pic to download, even though I had the link. I think I must take your advice and upgrade to 256 MB Ram, as 128 is clearly not enough for my current needs.

Now that the aircraft has been identified as the Fairchild 71, here is some more info



Listed below are specifications and performance data for the "Wasp" powered Fairchild "Model 71";


Wing span 50'2", chord 84", wing area 332 sq. ft., airfoil Gottingen Mod., length 33' height 9'4".
The following weights are for the earliest version, empty wt. 2700, useful load 2500, payload 1427, gross wt. 5200 lb..
Max. speed 138, cruise 110, land 52, climb (420 h.p.) 980, ceiling 15,500 ft.,
Gas cap. 148 gal., oil 12 gal., range 650+ miles.

Most of the Model "71" however were as follows; (landplane), empty wt. 2930, useful load 2570, payload 1500, gross wt. 5500 lb.,
Max. speed 135, cruise 110, land 57, climb(420 h p.) 900, ceiling 15,300 ft..
Gas cap. 148 gal., oil 12 gal., range 650+ miles.

As a seaplane with Fairchild" pontoons; empty wt. 3270, useful load 2230, payload 1160, grc>ss wt. 5500 lbs..
Max speed 129, cruise 105, land 57, climb 875, ceiling 15,000 ft., range 630 miles.

Price at the factory as landplane was $18,900., price as seaplane was $22,400.
Standard equipment included metal prop, wheel brakes, inertiatype engine starter, and cabin heater.
The latest and heaviest version weighed as follows; empty wt. 3130, useful load 2370, payload 1240, gross wt. 5500 lbs.
Max. speed 138, cruise 110, land 57, climb (450 h.p.) 1000, ceiling 16,000 ft.
Gas cap. 160 gal., oil 15 gal., range 770 miles.

The fuselage framework was built up of welded chrome-moly steel tubing, faired to shape and fabric covered. The wing framework was built up of spruce box-type spars and spruce and plywood truss-type ribs, also fabric covered.

Fuel tanks were mounted in the wing. The fabric covered tail-group was built up of welded chrome-moly steel tubing, the fin was ground adjustable and the horizontal stabilizer was adjustable in flight. The baggage area was in the cabin aft.

There are some other interesting pictures at the website from which the above specs were obtained. Take a look at this ground up restoration of N2K

http://www.moxon.org/aircraft/f_71.htm






Behind every "no" is a "yes"
User currently offlineRojo From Spain, joined Sep 2000, 2443 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (13 years 6 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 1693 times:

Brissie_Lions

You are right, Anahuac was the place where the aztecs established their home called Tenochtitlan.
It was called Valley of Anahuac because it is a very extensive territory and today Mexico City stands in the former Valley of Anahuac. Although we don´t call it like that anymore. If you take a look to our flag, you´ll see an eagle eating a snake standing in a cactus, that cactus with the eagle and the snake was found in the Valley of Anahuac. So it is quite important for our culture.

It has been Mexicana´s tradition to give its airplanes the name of a region, place or city in Mexico´s territory. So I´m pretty sure that airliner was named Anahuac, starting the tradition.

Rojo


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