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Denied Even Check-inn!  
User currently offlineHorvik89 From Norway, joined Nov 2007, 79 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 11615 times:

Hey All!

Im a student in Birmingham, and recently i was booked on the 12pm CO flight from LGW-IAH flight.
I got up really early in Birmingham to catch the Nationwide Airport Express to LGW from Birmingham city at 06am. After a really long bus ride i arrived at Continental Check inn where i handed inn my Norwegian passport. A few minutes later they called me over where some concierge person told me they could not let me fly because i was using my Norwegian passport and not my US passport! I was surprised as how could they know i had a US passport?! AND, it had expired, so i could'nt really use it. Still they would'nt let me fly!

The reason they gave me was that the US government had issued regulations to all airlines flying to the US, that all American citizens have to fly on they're US passports. If not, the carrier would be fined. Is this true or at all BS?
CO being my favorite airline let me down for the very very first time. They re booked me on the flight 2 days later because i had to get my US passport renewed. I did, and also treated myself to an upgrade to BusinessFirst, which was great. I still think that the reasons they gave me to not flying were not good enough and if really they hadn't overbooked or something, i feel like that this was such a stupid reason not to let a passenger fly. Is there really such a stupid regulation that US citizens HAVE to use their US passport while flying to the US? And if so, what is the reason for it!?

Thanks


"Work Hard, Fly Right" - Continental Forever
106 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineYVRtoYYZ From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 646 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 11531 times:

Sounds more like a visa issue required to enter the US under the citizenship of a Norwegian.

I encountered the same issues years ago with my expired Canadian passport being accepted over my valid British passport simply because I did not have the required visa to enter the US as a British subject.


User currently offlineBond007 From United States of America, joined Mar 2005, 5343 posts, RR: 8
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 11522 times:

According to the US Department of State, you must use a US passport if you are US Citizen.

"...Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States..."

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1753.html

Not sure what the "most" term means ... presumably some exceptions, but most probably not you.

IMO, if you are a US citizen, you are ill advised to travel internationally without your US passport.


Jimbo



I'd rather be on the ground wishing I was in the air, than in the air wishing I was on the ground!
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 11516 times:

You don't need a visa for the US as a Norwegian citizen. Norway is one of the Vias-Waiver countries.


You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineDanny From Poland, joined Apr 2002, 3505 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 11498 times:

US citizens must travel to US on their USA passport. It is a legal requirement and CO must comply with it whether they like it or not.

User currently offlinePmk From United States of America, joined May 1999, 664 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 11502 times:

I deal with this every day, and unfortunately CO was correct. The US Department of State requires you to use a US passport to enter the US if one has EVER been issued. The only way not to use it is to renounce your US Citizen/Alien Status formally and become a resident of another country.

Not that it makes sense...it doesn't; then again it's the government so it doesn't have to.

PMK


User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7345 posts, RR: 32
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11425 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Thread starter):
Is there really such a stupid regulation that US citizens HAVE to use their US passport while flying to the US?

YES

Maybe if you were out of the US - you missed the media frenzy - the 2,326,783 threads on this forum and others along with the constant news reports. But as of Jan 2007 - all AIR travel required a US passport for US citizens - even trips to Canada or Mexico.

You are very lucky you are in a country where you can go to the US Embassy/Consulate and get it resolved. In the US, you'd have to wait two to three weeks.

"Most" means things like military personnel on official orders don't need a passport, etc.

Soon all ship travel will require passports - so the cruises from Florida and the Gulf coast to Mexico or the Bahamas will mean every person must have a passport.

In a few years, surface (car) travel across the Canada / Mexico border may require a passport. Many states are balking at the requirements for enhanced driver licenses - so passports are probably.


User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21416 posts, RR: 60
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11366 times:



Quoting Pmk (Reply 5):
Not that it makes sense...it doesn't; then again it's the government so it doesn't have to.

It makes it much easier to keep track of people entering and exiting, and identities, if you must always enter and leave o your USA passport.

Now Horvik, the only thing CO could have done was to let you board on your Norway passport and then show your expired USA passport at entry. You likely would have been admitted, but if not CO would have had to fly you back at their expense.

Why I say you likely would have been admitted is that my friend was admitted. He arrived with his Aussi passport but only because the USA hadn't gotten his renewal back to him after 12 weeks. The ICE team was actually quite friendly, questioned him a little, but knew this delay was a problem, and looked him up in the computer. Then let him enter under the USA passport information despite not even having it in hand.

But this was off of Qantas at LAX. Maybe EWR is less helpful...



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineFFlyer From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 732 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11334 times:

There is also this one thing that you yourself should consider: In principle, if you would enter the US with a foreign passport, you would only be given 90 days (is that the number?) maximum to stay in the country. If you wouldn't leave within that period, you would be in trouble the next time when entering the US.

User currently offlineHorvik89 From Norway, joined Nov 2007, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11320 times:

Wow, thanks for all the replies!
Yeah, now we know what the computers before check-inn are for... check your background?
Well, i eventually flew out two days late, and now know that i have to fly on my US passport whenever entering the US. Though, i think they should make it a regular question while booking over the phone with an agent. It seems like many people make this mistake.



"Work Hard, Fly Right" - Continental Forever
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21416 posts, RR: 60
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11265 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 9):
Though, i think they should make it a regular question while booking over the phone with an agent. It seems like many people make this mistake.

I assume it's in your CO record that you have a USA passport and your passport number is in the computer. So they assume you know the laws of your country. As a USA citizen, this is your country after all. And while we theoretically believe in innocence until proven guilty, ignorance of the law is not an excuse in the USA.

But had you flown another airline you had never flown before, and only given them your Norway information, you probably would have been able to enter under the Norway passport. But then you are on a guest visa waiver, and could only stay a short amount of time, and only do so a certain number of times within 5 years, etc.

Much easier to enter on the USA passport where you can stay as long as you want and ICE doesn't have to keep track of you. Less paperwork for them...  Wink



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineHorvik89 From Norway, joined Nov 2007, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11221 times:

But i never ever used my US passport with Continental before..... How did they know?


"Work Hard, Fly Right" - Continental Forever
User currently offlineSsides From United States of America, joined Feb 2001, 4059 posts, RR: 21
Reply 12, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11154 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 11):
But i never ever used my US passport with Continental before..... How did they know?

They have to give the government a flight manifest prior to departure. This was probably flagged.



"Lose" is not spelled with two o's!!!!
User currently offlineAbrelosojos From Venezuela, joined May 2005, 5014 posts, RR: 55
Reply 13, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11157 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Thread starter):
Hey All!

Im a student in Birmingham, and recently i was booked on the 12pm CO flight from LGW-IAH flight.
I got up really early in Birmingham to catch the Nationwide Airport Express to LGW from Birmingham city at 06am. After a really long bus ride i arrived at Continental Check inn where i handed inn my Norwegian passport. A few minutes later they called me over where some concierge person told me they could not let me fly because i was using my Norwegian passport and not my US passport! I was surprised as how could they know i had a US passport?! AND, it had expired, so i could'nt really use it. Still they would'nt let me fly!

The reason they gave me was that the US government had issued regulations to all airlines flying to the US, that all American citizens have to fly on they're US passports. If not, the carrier would be fined. Is this true or at all BS?
CO being my favorite airline let me down for the very very first time. They re booked me on the flight 2 days later because i had to get my US passport renewed. I did, and also treated myself to an upgrade to BusinessFirst, which was great. I still think that the reasons they gave me to not flying were not good enough and if really they hadn't overbooked or something, i feel like that this was such a stupid reason not to let a passenger fly. Is there really such a stupid regulation that US citizens HAVE to use their US passport while flying to the US? And if so, what is the reason for it!?

Thanks

= I think you are unfairly blaming Continental. As others have pointed out, it is U.S. requirement for its passport holders to travel in/out of the U.S. on their U.S. passport. As Ikraamerica has mentioned, sometimes this is overlooked if the airline has no record of your other passport.

Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 11):
But i never ever used my US passport with Continental before..... How did they know?

= Is your passport on CO or CO.COM profile? Moreover, do you live in the U.K.? If you have a residency permit, where is that on?

Cheers,
A.



Live, and let live.
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21416 posts, RR: 60
Reply 14, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 11131 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 11):
But i never ever used my US passport with Continental before..... How did they know?

that's only one way they might know. that would have been flagged from the CO side. but if the USA government knows, it would have been flagged in the computer from the ICE side and CO would have been notified in your record: "ask this man why he is not traveling according to the laws of his country."  Wink



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineHorvik89 From Norway, joined Nov 2007, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 11080 times:

A law, according to me, should be notified more often to travelers.
CO had no fault, i do agree with that, but i think that this law should be advertised a little more.

There is just one more question, was it in CO's policy to give me a new ticket, or did they just do this out of good will?



"Work Hard, Fly Right" - Continental Forever
User currently offlineEWRCabincrew From United States of America, joined May 2006, 5523 posts, RR: 56
Reply 16, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 11054 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 15):
CO had no fault, i do agree with that, but i think that this law should be advertised a little more.

How about being more proactive as the traveller? Case in point: US Customs has/had a brochure about what you can/can't bring into the US called "Know Before You Go". Implying that you should know about the regulations before you leave and no excuse when you show up later at border control, bewildered.

Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 15):
did they just do this out of good will

Might have been good will as it was not a rule that CO set forth, but the powers that be.



You can't cure stupid
User currently offlineKaiGywer From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 12163 posts, RR: 36
Reply 17, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 11016 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 6):
Soon all ship travel will require passports - so the cruises from Florida and the Gulf coast to Mexico or the Bahamas will mean every person must have a passport.



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 6):
In a few years, surface (car) travel across the Canada / Mexico border may require a passport. Many states are balking at the requirements for enhanced driver licenses - so passports are probably.

Try next summer. Originally it was to take effect in a few days, but because of the huge backlog, there is no possible way to do so:

LAND AND SEA TRAVEL
The following summarizes information available on the Department of Homeland Security’s website.

JANUARY 31, 2008
U.S. and Canadian citizens will need to present either a WHTI-compliant document, or a government-issued photo ID, such as a driver’s license, plus proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate. DHS also proposes to begin alternative procedures for U.S. and Canadian children at that time.


SUMMER 2008
At a later date, to be determined, the departments will implement the full requirements of the land and sea phase of WHTI. The proposed rules require most U.S. citizens entering the United States at sea or land ports of entry to have either a U.S. passport; a U.S. passport card; a trusted traveler card such as NEXUS, FAST, or SENTRI; a valid Merchant Mariner Document (MMD) when traveling in conjunction with official maritime business; or a valid U.S. Military identification card when traveling on official orders.

The implementation date will be determined based on a number of factors, including the progress of actions undertaken by the Department of Homeland Security to implement the WHTI requirements and the availability of WHTI compliant documents on both sides of the border. DHS and DOS expect the date of full WHTI implementation to be in the summer of 2008. The precise implementation date will be formally announced with at least 60 days notice.


http://travel.state.gov/travel/cbpmc/cbpmc_2223.html



911, where is your emergency?
User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7345 posts, RR: 32
Reply 18, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 11016 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 15):
i do agree with that, but i think that this law should be advertised a little more.

It was all over the web for most of late 2006 and the first half of 2007.

US Embassies and consulates in every country had posters up and information on the changes.

After the change went into effect - there were hundreds of news stories about people having to cancel or change holiday and business travel because the US Passport office was backed up several weeks due to the volume of new passport requests.

It became such a big news story this year that President Bush had to specifically address the issue and how they were going to fix it in press conferences and speeches.

There were many posts / threads on this forum and almost every forum involving airline travel. While nost of the focus was on the NEW requirement for passports for travel to Mexico, Canada and the Caribbean - it was clear that any US citizen worldwide needed a valid passport to cross the US border.

Now I've lived outside the US for many years. Even on a US military base it is very easy to miss a 'big story' in the US.

But this requirement was publicized extensively across the world.

-----------------------
CO was being nice - but they probably would have had to refund your original ticket if they had not been able to carry you. Airlines do not purposely try to take people's money and not deliver a flight. When there are problems, in general they work it out.

They would much rather keep your money and put you on a different flight than deal with any issue about refunds.


User currently offlineHorvik89 From Norway, joined Nov 2007, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 11000 times:



Quoting EWRCabincrew (Reply 16):
How about being more proactive as the traveller? Case in point: US Customs has/had a brochure about what you can/can't bring into the US called "Know Before You Go". Implying that you should know about the regulations before you leave and no excuse when you show up later at border control, bewildered.

And where can i find this information, at any airport? Airline web sites? I cant find any....



"Work Hard, Fly Right" - Continental Forever
User currently offlineSwiftski From Australia, joined Dec 2006, 2701 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 10983 times:

FFlyer,

I have 4 US entry stamps for '07.

6 months, 1 month, plus two "undefined"

Depended on the q's they asked me, and my answers.


User currently offlineHorvik89 From Norway, joined Nov 2007, 79 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 10971 times:

I see, thanks for all answers, maybe i was ignorant. I just did'nt know...

I rest my case  Smile



"Work Hard, Fly Right" - Continental Forever
User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7345 posts, RR: 32
Reply 22, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 10942 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 19):
And where can i find this information, at any airport? Airline web sites? I cant find any....

As a US citizen - the United States State Department is your PRIMARY and only OFFICIAL source on travel document requirements.

Airlines have no responsibility to do more than deny boarding to passengers who do not have correct documentation.

Yes, many do a good job of helping potential passengers find out what is needed.

But it is and always has been the traveler's responsibility to research the GOVERNMENTS involved and find out what documentation is required.

You got a wake-up call with this trip, you learned something and though you were inconvenienced a bit - everything worked out. You missed the information in the media - that happens - no big deal.

One other point - I'd strongly recommend you keep your US passport always up to date/ valid. My son and daughter do - they haven't traveled on them since 1986 - but we never let them expire.

But remember the lesson in the future - a quick phone call to the embassy or consulate - a check of the State Department web site - those can save you a lot of trouble in the future.

http://www.state.gov/travelandbusiness/


User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7345 posts, RR: 32
Reply 23, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 16 hours ago) and read 10921 times:



Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 19):
Airline web sites?

http://www.continental.com/web/en-US...ent/travel/airport/id/default.aspx

Quote:
U.S. federal legislation requires all customers, regardless of citizenship or age, to hold a valid passport for travel by air to or from the U.S. Review the complete details.



User currently offlinePlaneInsomniac From Canada, joined Nov 2007, 647 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (6 years 3 months 4 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 10049 times:



Quoting RFields5421 (Reply 18):
Quoting Horvik89 (Reply 15):
i do agree with that, but i think that this law should be advertised a little more.

It was all over the web for most of late 2006 and the first half of 2007.

The news and information I have seen (including posters at airports and borders) pretty much only state(d) that every U.S. citizen now requires a passport to travel. It is by no means an automatic conclusion that with a dual citizenship, you require a currently valid U.S. passport. After all, a Norwegian passport is also a passport.

Still, it would certainly have been a wise move to double-check the exact regulations on some official website.



Am I cured? Slept 5 hours on last long-haul flight...
25 PlaneInsomniac : See, that is exactly the problem. This statement does not automatically imply that with a dual citizenship you need a U.S. passport, even if you have
26 Bond007 : Which is why those with 'dual' citizenship should make sure they know what they're doing. As far as travelling to/from the USA, it is only sensible t
27 Abrelosojos : = Do you have a U.S. visa though? For visa waiver countries, its always 90days,unless the person has another visa. VERY FEW countries on earth active
28 Zvezda : I've never heard of this. How many times in 5 years can one enter the States under the Visa Waiver Program?
29 Bond007 : The import part is "Review the complete details". Clicking through to the Department of State website gives you the sentence I quoted earlier: "Most
30 RIXrat : Being born in Latvia many moons ago, when I came back here from the U.S., the Latvians foisted a Latvian passport on me by telling me that it was much
31 Post contains images Acheron : It's your name James Bond, by any chance?.
32 Post contains images Bond007 : Wrong one Jimbo
33 N757KW : My understanding is that the U.S. only recognizes a few countries citizens as having dual citizenship, U.S. and the other country. The one I know abou
34 BALHRWWCC : I know that my partner was born in USA but is dual nationality USA/UK they will not issue a visa in his uk passport. The USA are getting strict.... fi
35 Bond007 : AFAIK they 'recognize' that US citizens might have dual citizenship. No specific countries are mentioned. The fact that bthe USA 'recognizes' this, m
36 BALHRWWCC : easy choice uk. The passport is widely accepted worldwide without requiring a visa. Cos i work for a airline it just means cant travel to the US beca
37 Post contains links Nickofatlanta : This is actually common practice in other countries too. Australia has the same rules for their citizens: http://www.immi.gov.au/media/fact-sheets/95d
38 DFW13L : By "most" passengers, I think they are probably referring to the compliance regulations of submitting APIS. The airline has to be in 97% compliance of
39 Horvik89 : Yeah, CO did'nt deny me because they wanted to ( i hope ). I wonder though, when will CO upgrade their BusinessFirst product? DOes anybody have any in
40 AR385 : True. During the late 80's my mother, who is from Argentina, but a naturalized Mexican citizen travelled to Argentina and they would not let her in w
41 Jafa39 : Well if you'd been living in rural NZ ...or even AKL, you would not have heard of this, I think it is very arrogant of a country to make a law change
42 Bond007 : I found all the information I posted, sitting in front of my PC. I assume they also have telephones in rural NZ, where you might ask the airline, or
43 ADXMatt : Welcome to the era of "big brother watching you". Oh wait ... it's called the Patriot Act. The immigration service must have your other passport in i
44 Horvik89 : I know, seems like CO is used to these things happening and rebooked me free of charge for a later flight.
45 Analog : It's a lot easier to learn something that you're supposed to know when you're actively looking for it. Of course that pretty much requires knowing th
46 Post contains images Horvik89 : Is it free phone or is it one of those, "please hold" at 0.50$ a minute.... I JK
47 Mir : Foreign nationals can't stay in the US indefinitely - they have to be out by a certain time. If he were to enter the US on his Norwegian passport and
48 Aerofan : Quoting Horvik89 " Is this true or at all BS? CO being my favorite airline let me down for the very very first time. They re booked me on the flight 2
49 Avek00 : I dare say most USA citizens would intuitively present their USA passports if trying to enter the USA. I'm at a loss of logic to understand why a USA
50 Zvezda : The OP made that quite clear -- his American passport was expired. Another reason why someone might chosen to travel on a European Union (I'm aware t
51 Avek00 : None of this excuses an American not having an American passport when going to America.
52 Analog : For a few more days it's okay, as long as you fly to Canada or Mexico first. Permanent Residents can stay indefinitely. In fact they get in trouble i
53 Jafa39 : You'd be right but there is a flaw in your arguement..........what if you didn't know there had been any changes? I have a UK passport and if going t
54 Avek00 : Having a citizen enter on a foreign passport presents a host of legal difficulties.
55 Mir : Correct, of course. That hadn't crossed my mind. And them getting in trouble if they stay away too long is one of the many immigration rules that don
56 Horvik89 : Believe it or not, but, at least here in Norway from what i see, it does really seem like the Bush admin has made it dangerous to travel around as an
57 Post contains images Bond007 : Ummm, whose argument is flawed?? We have to do it every time we travel. Please don't tell us that it's OK to be ignorant about travel restrictions an
58 Horvik89 : Actually, i have triple citizenship, let that blow your minds..... Father norwegian, mother italian, and born in the US.
59 Post contains images Bond007 : Then it's ridiculous to assume that anyone but yourself is responsible for checking the documentation you need to travel. If that's too tough for you
60 Horvik89 : The thing is, i seem to always have gotten away with it, and i travel a lot, and well, i never knew this policy existed. I do check regulations etc, b
61 Zvezda : Norwegian citizens with a valid Norwegian passport have the right to show up at a US border checkpoint and request entry under the Visa Waiver program
62 Bond007 : If that's what he wants, then let him rescind his US citizenship ... solved. No, it doesn't limit it at all, if he has the required documentatiion. A
63 Post contains links Danny : Most U.S. citizens, including dual nationals, must use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the United States. Dual nationals may also be required by t
64 Kiwiandrew : Australia actually does the same thing - I remember as a travel agent being absolutely astounded to discover this from a colleague who had both NZ and
65 Analog : Renouncing US citizenship it not easy. Nor is it always legal. The whole problem with the idea that people should know the law is that there are alwa
66 Post contains images Horvik89 : Wow, no reason to act up a storm here. I understand now the seriousness of rules and regulations now, and will ofc course look more into what is requi
67 Bond007 : You can try and use this very silly argument, OR you can just Google something like "travelling to from USA citizen" and low and behold, the FIRST 2
68 Post contains images Horvik89 : (Just had to ruin my Happy X-Mas Post)..... LOL, lets not argue more on the topic.... I greatly appreciate all your comments and helps Meerrryyyy X-Ma
69 Post contains images PlaneInsomniac : That is exactly what I am thinking. I am wondering whether all the people here, who claim that it's the most obvious thing to do, search the entire w
70 Bond007 : It isn't what he thought ... he didn't have a valid US passport. Jimbo
71 Post contains images AC772 : That is amazing that this is only their first time letting you down! It is awkward that you would have to get a new passport. Best wishes for you in t
72 Post contains images Jafa39 : Boo hoo, I feel soo sorry for the US Immigration dept. Dude, He did not have a US passport, it had expired as he was living in Norway, you can keep g
73 Avek00 : I sure as heck do, EVERY time I travel. Why? Becuase the responsibility for having proper documentation rests with ME and with NO ONE ELSE. Not the a
74 Post contains images Lufthansa747 : It's silly to say that the OP should have known. Even Timatic which is the IATA thing for entry regulations doesn't list the requirement. The followin
75 PlaneInsomniac : And that is a good idea - I (almost) always do that, too. But there are cases when it just does not seem necessary at all. To repeat my example from
76 NYC2theworld : Lets say this again: (bold added for emphasis) He had a US passport, didn't use it when establishing travel because he knew it was invalid. He tried
77 Post contains links Nickofatlanta : Hello all - First of all, happy christmas to all! As a point of fact before starting: i am a dual eu / us citizen. I happened to know about the regul
78 RFields5421 : Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to everyone. One point about dual citizenship - that doubles your obligations, paperwork and the complexity of ever
79 Bond007 : I didn't. I dared suggest that if he thinks the regulations are so damn difficult for HIMSELF, because he chooses to have dual-citizenship, then perh
80 Mariner : Who is claiming that? I live in rural New Zealand, I hold dual citizenship - two passports - and neither is New Zealand citizenship or passport. I wa
81 Trintocan : What an interesting discussion. Horvik, may I say that what happened is that you made a mistake. You should not be criticised for making this mistake
82 Post contains images Jafa39 : So...a US passport...even an INVALID US passport, invalidates all other passports you may hold if entering the US???...utter BS....oh its true, I'm n
83 Zvezda : It seems like the logical solution to this problem is to have each country issue its passport with a different name, date of birth, and place of birth
84 Mariner : Why is it arrogant for a country to expect its citizens to produce proof of citizenship when they want to enter the country? I would never consider g
85 NYC2theworld : It becomes an offense when you travel abroad, let it expire abroad, do not get it renewed at a Consulate or Embassay, and then try to use another pas
86 Post contains images Lufthansa747 : Again, Timatic, the IATA interface mentions NOTHING when you input US-US or NO-US. This is the system the check-in agents use. Aparently a traveller c
87 Trintocan : Actually some countries will admit a citizen with an expired passport as long as they can validate that the person concerned is still a citizen - the
88 Jafa39 : Because he is also a Norwegian citizen and was travelling as such....not hard to work out if you try. As people enter a country they do need to produ
89 Mariner : And as such, he could have been denied entry. Not hard to work out if you try. The people at Continental don't know what the US INS at the point of e
90 Bond007 : AND he was a US citizen. He didn't decide to travel as a US or Norwegian citizen .... that's not a decision, since he is always a citizen of both cou
91 Zvezda : The OP's identification was not in question (based on his current Norwegian passport) and his US citizenship was not in question (based on his expired
92 Analog : It seems pretty absurd when you put it that way. If they know you're a citizen, why are they demanding proof thereof? If they don't know you're a cit
93 Mariner : There are two separate issues. The statement made was that he was a Norwegian citizen - and travelling as such: As such, he has no automatic right of
94 Jafa39 : So the visa waiver programme means nothing???? I had no automatic right of entry to any of the countries I have visited but they always let me on the
95 Zvezda : But the OP did have an automatic right of entry. So long as identity is not in doubt and US citizenship has not been repudiated, an expired US passpo
96 Mariner : Yes. But it is a well-advertized requirement of the Federal department in charge of these matters that he have a valid passport as proof of that auto
97 Zvezda : No, a current US passport is not a requirement for entry to the States. It is only a requirement for some forms of transportation to an entry point.
98 Par13del : To be sarcastic, it is unfortunate that the US is finally coming out of the dark ages and getting into step with most "progressive countries" and doin
99 Bond007 : But he didn't. He was a US citizen travelling by air, required a US passport and didn't have one . Jimbo
100 Post contains images Analog : If a baby is born before customs & immigration upon arrival in the US, it's an American citizen. Will the US turn the kid away because he/she doesn't
101 Mariner : It is one of the requirements. At any entry point you will have to satisfy immigration that you have right of entry into the US - a valid passport is
102 SBBRTech : wow, Horvik, only 2 days for a passport renewal? Was that too damn fast or what? You got lucky, in most places you'd have postponed your trip at leas
103 Jafa39 : Well said!!
104 LH423 : Actually, these requirements are separate of WHTI. WHTI only stipulates that travellers regardless of nationality have a passport to enter the US. Th
105 Zvezda : So, you don't find it absurd that the OP could have flown to Canada on his Norwegian passport, then with a separate ticket, entered the US at a Canad
106 Bond007 : As I've said before ... nobody needs to know "every nuance of the law". This really isn't complicated guys. If you have more than one passport, I don
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