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How Much Does It Cost To Fly A Body?  
User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6095 posts, RR: 28
Posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 159247 times:
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Sounds like an odd thread, but This morning I found out one of my good friends died, unexpectedly. He lived in Detroit and his family lived in Sullivan, Illinois. His mother was going to have him flown home. That got me wonder how much it would cost to fly a body from one place to another. I know that kind of thing happens on a regular basis, but I have never known anyone that had to do it before.

Since you wouldn't buy the ticket with advanced notice would it be like buying full fare Y class? Would a body have to be flown on a mainline aircraft? I would think a CRJ would be a bit small.


My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
63 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineStylo777 From Germany, joined Feb 2006, 2972 posts, RR: 12
Reply 1, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 159224 times:

so awful and terrible it sounds they (the bereaved) get charged like cargo and not as a passenger.

I'm pretty sure that the casket doesn't fit into the hold of regional aircrafts such as CRJ, ATR or BAE so they need at least mainline planes.


User currently offlineCanadianNorth From Canada, joined Aug 2002, 3390 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 159220 times:

Well I occasionally see "hummers" sitting on the cart when I pass through Cargo, so I'd imagine they would be shipped/charged similar to cargo.

And yeah, they do look a little big for the CRJ (the ones I see go on 737s).


CanadianNorth



What could possibly go wrong?
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 159186 times:

We did that when my maternal grandmother died. She was living with us in Tennessee, but the family home was in northern Pennsylvania. Typically the arrangements are made by the funeral director, so there may be some different charge that is not public. There might be some possibility of a body being transported on a regional aircraft, dependent on the size of the body and the size of the casket. If the director were concerned about the size/weight of the casket, they can arrange to send the body in a smaller, lightweight fiberboard shipping casket and have the receiving funeral director arrange for the other one. I suppose that if the remains could be fitted into the smaller cargo hold, they might have to bump some passenger bags and/or other lower priority freight.


"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineVictorKilo From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 312 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 159100 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Thread starter):
This morning I found out one of my good friends died, unexpectedly.

Condolences on your recent loss.

I live in Detroit but grew up in East Central Illinois. It's only about eight hours by car from Detroit to Sullivan. I'm wondering if there is a reason why the body would be shipped via air instead of via ground.


User currently offlineCV580Freak From Bahrain, joined Jul 2005, 1033 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 159060 times:

Sad to hear of your loss of your friend.

Not sure about within domestic USA but in Europe the cargo rate is 200% of the full IATA rate.

There are specialist funeral directors that deal specifically with air transportation of human remains and they are well versed in the necessary packing of the coffin and what paperwork is necessary.



One day you are the pigeon, the next the statue ...
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 6, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 159056 times:



Quoting 57AZ (Reply 3):
There might be some possibility of a body being transported on a regional aircraft, dependent on the size of the body and the size of the casket

There was a story in the Wall Street Journal a few years ago about flying the disceased on commercial flights. I've forgotten most of the details, but I seem to remember the article included some "sample pricing"; that it was charged more like cargo than passenger, and that serveral airlines (including B6 and AA) have, essentially, a "frequent dead flyer" program for funeral directors to earn free travel, etc.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 7, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 9 hours ago) and read 159047 times:

I hear that they are a pain in the butt to 'shoehorn' the caskets in the M80's....


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25291 posts, RR: 22
Reply 8, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 8 hours ago) and read 158974 times:

Most major airlines have provisions in their cargo website covering human remains shipments. Examples for AA, CO, DL:
http://www.aacargo.com/shipping/humanremains.jhtml
http://cargo.cocargo.com/cargo/products/trustco.aspx
http://www.delta.com/business_progra...rgo_products_services/delta_cares/

AA has long used the name "Jim Wilson" as a code name for human remains shipments. When funeral directors call AA they ask for the "Jim Wilson Desk". Some history re that here:
http://www.doubletongued.org/index.php/dictionary/jim_wilson


User currently offlineFalstaff From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 6095 posts, RR: 28
Reply 9, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 158825 times:
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Quoting VictorKilo (Reply 4):
I live in Detroit but grew up in East Central Illinois. It's only about eight hours by car from Detroit to Sullivan. I'm wondering if there is a reason why the body would be shipped via air instead of via ground.

. I was unaware about ground shipping. Who handles that? A company like UPS? Maybe his mom wanted air because it was faster.

My buddy, Mitch's body will be flying into STL.

Quoting VictorKilo (Reply 4):
Condolences on your recent loss.

Thank you. He died of a heart attack, he was 29. He had a HUGE drinking problem and had other health issues, it doesn't come as a huge shock, but I was not expecting it so soon.

Quoting 57AZ (Reply 3):
If the director were concerned about the size/weight of the casket, they can arrange to send the body in a smaller, lightweight fiberboard shipping casket and have the receiving funeral director arrange for the other one. I suppose that if the remains could be fitted into the smaller cargo hold, they might have to bump some passenger bags and/or other lower priority freight.

Mitch weighed in at 400 plus pounds so I could see him bumping some stuff on a CRJ. He would have got a kick out of that.



My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 10, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 158658 times:

HRs are shipped as cargo...and as said already, they are usually taken care of by the funeral director of some sort. I don't personally know the fees involved, because I don't work at cargo, but I can't imagine it's cheap. I will tell you this - funeral homes that use DL out of DAB (and I'm sure this is available at other stations) receive SkyMiles for the final destination trips that their HRs go on.

As for talk about what aircraft are used...as far as we go, we never put HRs on CRJs. Unless it's a shorter person, or a child (not exactly the funnest experience), it can't really fit on an RJ, unless it's almost empty. Although I did put a very small 8"x8"x8" box once on an RJ that had human remains...the ashes only.

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 7):
I hear that they are a pain in the butt to 'shoehorn' the caskets in the M80's....

If you mean turn them, because of the size of the bins...yes, you are right. Especially larger ones. Sometimes it takes a few of us to get it into or out of the bin because of the size of the HR and the shape of the bin.

Overall, it's an odd experience - for someone who doesn't do autopsies regularly or anything. But someone's gotta do it, and it's all part of the job.


User currently offlineBoeing777228 From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 21 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days 1 hour ago) and read 158608 times:

I do services for Royal Jordanian at DTW. We send human remains back to the Middle East often. I would say it averages $2000-$3000 per body.

User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2135 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 158532 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Reply 9):
Mitch weighed in at 400 plus pounds so I could see him bumping some stuff on a CRJ.

Hmm...this time of year, probably not much room to fit that size package into the bottom of an RJ. If he has to be flown home, I'd imagine a cargo carrier (FedEx, UPS, etc) serves Decatur? But judging from the small distances we're talking about (Detroit to Sullivan), Mitch may as well go by road - he'd be um, home for Christmas.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 13, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 158527 times:



Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 10):
If you mean turn them, because of the size of the bins...yes, you are right. Especially larger ones. Sometimes it takes a few of us to get it into or out of the bin because of the size of the HR and the shape of the bin.

 checkmark  Yup, that's exactly what I meant. I cannot imagine being the ramper to load the casket on the M80 or being the ramper in the back of the forward cargo pit and imaging being stuck back there....

Creepy.

Falstaff, my condolences to your loss.  pray 



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 158506 times:



Quoting Falstaff (Reply 9):

I was unaware about ground shipping. Who handles that?

There are services that will transport the body by ground for the funeral director, if they choose not to transport it themselves. Usually the body will be transported using a "First Call" vehicle-usually a van or truck but occasionally an older model hearse. The vehicle will almost certainly have the landau irons on the rear quarter panels. These vehicles are routinely used to transport the remains from the morgue or hospital to the funeral home and to transport supplies such as chairs, flowers, casket lowering winches, etc. between the funeral home and cemetery.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineTennis69 From Qatar, joined Apr 2007, 401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 23 hours ago) and read 158473 times:
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Just a question. Why not have him cremated in Detroit and use Fedex to ship to Illinois? That's got to be the most economical.

User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 158162 times:



Quoting Tennis69 (Reply 15):
Just a question. Why not have him cremated in Detroit and use Fedex to ship to Illinois? That's got to be the most economical.

That decision would have to be made by the next of kin, assuming that the deceased did not leave instructions as to their wish. Some faiths prohibit the cremation for religious reasons. Last I read, cremation was still less popular than traditional burial by something like a 2 to 1 ratio, but it is increasing in popularity. My paternal grandfather was cremated and my grandmother will be cremated upon her passing, as will my father, mother and I. I don't know what my brother specified in his living will, but I wouldn't be surprised if he indicated cremation as well.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlineCchan From New Zealand, joined May 2003, 1761 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 158113 times:

I flew on a Saab340 from RAR to AIT in the Cook Islands with a body in the cargo hold. The body was shipped in a coffin, and was treated with respect by Air Rarotonga. A few passengers were bumped off (apparently the coffin is heavy), but at least some small turboprops can take bodies as cargo.

User currently offlineRogerbcn From Andorra, joined exactly 8 years ago today! , 1209 posts, RR: 20
Reply 18, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 20 hours ago) and read 158085 times:

Hola!

My grandmother died in Calgary in 1991 where she moved in the 1970s and she wanted to be buried in Girona, Spain, with my grandfather. All was arranged long before she passed away and it cost about 6,000 CDN$ at the time to take her on the flight YYC-FRA-BCN. I know it well because my aunt has had the same arrangements for herself. It ca be all arranged and paid in advance if that is your specific wish. Apart from the airfare you have to pay for a special metal coffin covering the wood one, plus taxes and all sorts of permits crossing borders.

I was on the flight back and I could see the coffin being taken on the cargo load, obviously not with luggage and regular cargo carts.

I have to say that AC staff were really nice and caring as they knew I was the relative travelling with her. Offered me to sit on a separate seat, offered me extra attention during the flight and cheered my spirit up.

Salut,

Roger



"At reise er at leve" H.C. Andersen (Travelling is Living)
User currently offlineImperialEagle From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 2593 posts, RR: 22
Reply 19, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 157520 times:
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There are two different types of containers used to ship HR's (Human Remains).

The "Air-Tray".
This container is composed of a plywood or fiberboard tray with raised edges and a cardboard-box type top section.
This is used when an HR is shipped in a casket or coffin, whichever the case may be. (Coffin's are fitted to the shoulders and narrow at the feet and are rarely seen in the U.S. where rectangular shaped caskets are used. Sometimes a "Ziegler Case" made of thin metal is used that is hermetically sealed or sealed by lead or screws as required by some countries when shipping an HR internationally). The casket or coffin is set into the tray and nylon straps used to secure it to the tray. Then the cardboard top is secured over the top (the edges of the top fit down inside the edges of the tray). Nylon straps then are tightened and secure the top to the tray.

The "Combo-Pak".
This container is used when an HR is to be transported WITHOUT an outside container such as a casket/coffin.
These have heavy, thick bases and sides to them with nylon straps inside to secure the ankles, waist and chest areas of the remains. There is a large foam "pillow" at the head-end to support the head, and a lid made of thick cardboard to place over the top.

"Combo-Pak's" are generally used when the deceased passes away far from their home-town and/or there is no type of service whatsoever to be held where the person passed away.The idea is to get the remains itself shipped back to a recieving mortuary facility for final disposition. The remains are then casketed at the recieving mortuary. This process also saves a good bit of money in the shipping because the weight of a casket/coffin is not involved. These containers generally have a pretty thick piece of plastic sheeting included, it is spread out and the remains placed in it and then the plastic sheeting wrapped around the remains to contain any leakage that might occur. ALSO, because the "Combo-Pak" does not contain a casket or other type of container within, it has smaller dimensions. It will fit into smaller compartments than an "Air-Tray", so is easier to handle and as previously mentioned, does not have the weight of the casket----so is cheaper to ship.

Of course, no matter which container is used, there are guidlines that must be followed concerning the preparation of the remains. Most of the time HR's shipped here within the US have been embalmed prior to shipment. There are exceptions made to accomodate the laws and customs of different religions (whose customs prohibit embalming) when possible, and the remains are usually packed in dry-ice for the trip. Also, there are various other regulations imposed by the air carriers and governments involved and it is up to the funeral director to be sure these details are complied with.

Typically these containers are very plainly marked. They are usually marked with signage that indicates the "HEAD" end of the container and possibly "HR- Handle with Care". While awaiting their flight they are usually placed on a cart by themselves that sometimes has a canvas drape of some sort to protect the container from rain or direct sun.

The whole idea of a family being able to air-ship the remains of a loved one is a wonderful thing. In the piston-engined era this was usually not possible unless the aircraft was a dedicated freighter with large main-deck cargo doors. In those days HR's were usually shipped by rail/sea, and or driven in a hearse or service vehicle, which, of course, was a much slower shipping process.

The statistics on how many HR's are shipped by air are usually a surprise to the average person. During the winter season in Florida, when the population swells with the elderly escaping the winter cold from up north, HR's have been known to be the #1 airfreight for a carrier on any given sector. I can remember years ago in TPA when it was quite common to see a dozen or more containers on carts waiting for their flights, hiding out of sight, under the airside building of the respective carrier involved.



"If everything seems under control, you're just not going fast enough!"
User currently offlineLuiePL From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 58 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 157456 times:

When I was working down at PHL, DL was a major HR carrier. I would see on average 1 "Air-Tray" a day. AA was pretty close behind. I never really saw any on US or the other carriers. I would agree that it is done through the funeral home, because I would always see the hearses in cargo city.

My condolences to you and your friends family.



-Luie PHL-
User currently offline57AZ From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 2550 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 17 hours ago) and read 157392 times:



Quoting ImperialEagle (Reply 19):
In the piston-engined era this was usually not possible unless the aircraft was a dedicated freighter with large main-deck cargo doors. In those days HR's were usually shipped by rail/sea, and or driven in a hearse or service vehicle, which, of course, was a much slower shipping process.

Traditionally, bodies shipped via rail were often accompanied by an attendant. Human Remains were never "shipped" but were escorted. The escort paid for two fares, one for themselves and one for the corpse. Usually the remains were shipped in the express or baggage car. Back in the days of train robberies, many express or baggage men would load the remains first, stacking the other shipments tightly on and around the casket, making it impossible to open from the inside. Hiding in a casket and emerging once the train was underway was a favorite trick of some desperatos.



"When a man runs on railroads over half of his lifetime he is fit for nothing else-and at times he don't know that."
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 22, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 156953 times:



Quoting Threepoint (Reply 12):
Hmm...this time of year, probably not much room to fit that size package into the bottom of an RJ

No time of year would there be room in the bottom of an RJ. That bin is about a foot and a half tall - tall enough to lay a standard roller carry-on bag on its side. Checked baggage and cargo goes in the aft bin - which is behind the passengers, and as tall as the cabin. The door is just underneath the left engine.

Quoting AirframeAS (Reply 13):
Yup, that's exactly what I meant. I cannot imagine being the ramper to load the casket on the M80 or being the ramper in the back of the forward cargo pit and imaging being stuck back there....

Creepy.

Yeah - I've done that many times, getting "stuck back there". But the bin is wide enough where you can get out on the side. Still not something I get up in the morning and say "I really want to do that".

Quoting 57AZ (Reply 14):
Usually the body will be transported using a "First Call" vehicle-usually a van or truck but occasionally an older model hearse.

I've offloaded an HR, after Cargo was closed, onto a minivan (I believe it was a Dodge Caravan) that was fitted with rollers in the back to allow for easy loading and unloading. What made it worse though, the whole family was off to the side in their own minivan, obviously not doing too well. That's not the time to make a mistake.

Quoting ImperialEagle (Reply 19):
The "Combo-Pak".

Nothing like knowing your a few inches away from something that, a few days hours/days ago, was a living, breathing, talking person, and now there not doing much at all. And the only thing between you and them is a piece of cardboard.

After all I've said though - I take some honor is being able to do this job. Like said before, this option wasn't always available to most people, so it's nice to know I can help provide this service. To anyone who has to use it: you have my sympathies.


User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 23, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 156801 times:



Quoting 57AZ (Reply 16):
Last I read, cremation was still less popular than traditional burial by something like a 2 to 1 ratio, but it is increasing in popularity.

You have that backwards. Cremation is now much more popular than traditional burial, more like 3:1 to 4:1. How I know this: My mother is currently a moritician/funeral home director for a few funeral homes in the state of Oregon. She has been doing this for years.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently onlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9370 posts, RR: 29
Reply 24, posted (6 years 8 months 3 weeks 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 156782 times:

Regardless what carriers regulations apply on US domestic, the International Carriage by Air of Human Remains is handled as in Rule 3.7.9 of the TACT

3.7.9 HUMAN REMAINS

Calculations

Areas Ashes Coffins
All IATA areas Applicable GCR Normal GCR
except within area 2

Within IATA area 2 300% of 200% of Normal GCR
normal GCR

The normal minimum charges are applicable, except for carriage withi TC2 where the min charge is 200% and not less than USD 65,00


Normal rate agreements of volume rates do not apply. There is a Commodity rate for HUGOs betrween Germany and Turkey, making it much cheaper to ship.

General rule and regulation - HUGOs may inly be delivereed and picked up to/from airports by hearses owned and operated by funeral homes-

That's why funeral homes make a killing out of the shipment of HUGOs.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
25 Post contains links United_Fan : http://www.customairtrays.com/ kind of interesting reading
26 BHMBAGLOCK : If he happened to be Mormon, Eastern Orthodox, Jewish, or another faith that prohibits or discourages cremation, then this could be an explanation. A
27 JAGflyer : The figure $5000 comes to mind for shipping a body from YYZ to TLV on AC. I was told this by someone who had to do it a few years ago. A lot of people
28 ImperialEagle : Those numbers may be the norm in Oregon and other areas out west, but that is certainly not the case on the east coast, and the deep south in particu
29 Post contains images SNAFlyboy : I've had some experiences with the "air-tray" type, and I would imagine that it would be extremely difficult to fit them into a regional jet. You have
30 Falstaff : He is no relation to me, just a good friend. His mother is in charge of the funeral/burial stuff. He will be buried next to his father. Mitch's famil
31 57AZ : Reminds me of a story related to the Commander of the Arizona Air National Guard (friend of my parents). Twice in his career he promised to scatter c
32 Mham001 : Just do a "Bernie", put some dark sunglasses on him and buy him an economy seat.
33 FLYB6JETS : B6 does not regularly transport human remains. At least they didn't when I left, things may have changed since then.
34 Falstaff : Wouldn't work with ole' Mitch. Being 400 pounds plus he would need two Y seats. When he traveled he always bought two seats or flew F (whatever was c
35 Wjcandee : KHA also used to have a substantial human remains business. However, IIRC, DL is right up there, perhaps because it has so much service from the North
36 Post contains images StasisLAX : I am not sure what Fedex regulations state, but here at DHL, all animal and human remains (including cremated remains) are considered prohibited item
37 PanHAM : well, that's not the reason. The same liability limits and restrictions apply in case of loss or damage as to any other shipments. Spcfial care is al
38 AirframeAS : I was speaking more in terms of a nationwide 'trend', not just the western states and Oregon State. I should have indicated that too, but I didn't. M
39 Bongodog1964 : Sounds about right. The last LHR - PHL I arranged was about £800. This isn't a regulation I've ever come across, certainly here in the UK no such ru
40 SBBRTech : 3 years ago a co-worker here had to ship his deceased elder brother from CDG to BSB via GIG...overall cost was near US$ 7000,00 with Air France and so
41 ImperialEagle : I am not aware of any funeral homes in the U.S. that "surcharge" a family for transferring the remains of their loved ones by air. If transporting by
42 Falstaff : I would imagine shipping on a DC-9 or a 717 would also be difficult.
43 PanHAM : well , in Germany there is. Human remains can be delivered and picked up to and from airports only by Funeral Homes in a hearse. Same applies for int
44 Bongodog1964 : Here in the UK we would handle everything "in house" if its domestic; the reason for using a specialist repatriation agent for non domestic, is becau
45 PanHAM : A coffin is handed out by the airline or their handling agent to the driver of a funeral home only. As simple as that. No family with a station waggo
46 ImperialEagle : Yeah, well here in the "States" no one in funeral service finds easy access to the embassies. Unless, of course, someone has a friend in their employ
47 Post contains links RFields5421 : Funeral directors associations have access to those specialists by their members. If someone needs to be taken home to anyplace in the world - the st
48 Post contains links RFields5421 : http://flightaware.com/live/flight/K...9/history/20071226/1326Z/KDOV/KMOR http://flightaware.com/live/flight/KFS1399 http://www.defenselink.mil/releas
49 ImperialEagle : Yeah, in whose utopian world might things always be that simple!?
50 DEVILFISH : I guess the authorities would accept an expired passport (highly unlikely that one can be issued posthumously) of the deceased as proof of identity a
51 ImperialEagle : Would depend a lot on the level of bureaucracy one encounters with the particular government officials. Sometimes it is not too bad, however, it is n
52 Post contains images AirframeAS : RFields is correct in that, Impearial. You can only have a deceased around the 'living world' (I cannot think of a better term...) for a very short a
53 Bongodog1964 : By "easy access", I meant being in close proximity to them; as the only sure fire way to get the necessary documents stamped and signed, is to turn u
54 JoKeR : Its same here in Serbia - very tightly regulated, and thankfully so!
55 TWAL1011727 : Delta charges based on the zones involved..(most majors use the same rate basis) Zone A - northeast Zone B - southeast Zone C - midwest Zone D - gulf
56 Post contains links and images Viscount724 : A couple of related pieces of trivia: Schiphol Airport at AMS is one of the few (possibly only?) airports with its own mortuary. If you arrive/depart
57 ImperialEagle : That is likely a good strategy----- if one can pull it off without angering the embassy staff! Not surprisingly, as seen by the difference in our opi
58 Post contains images BHMBAGLOCK : Unless it's Lenin or James Brown. Funny, you normally pay the extra toll to get out of NJ, not back in. DL obviously has this backwards.
59 Post contains images ImperialEagle : Too funny!
60 Post contains images DEVILFISH : Ah, yes. One would half expect government functionaries to actually identify the corpse visually from the passport photo, due to their fastidiousness
61 Post contains links StasisLAX : With all due respect, that's incorrect. I work for DHL in a corporate capacity, and was provided with that information in several formal training cla
62 PanHAM : In international carriage, the consulate will issue the necessary documents. No transport is carried out without valid documentaiton issued by the co
63 Bongodog1964 : Believe me, it happens here. In the UK we are only now seeing the death of the generations who were educated in the knowledge that the British empire
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