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Ramp Agent Killed At OKC  
User currently offlineMycrj17 From United States of America, joined Feb 2006, 269 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 7777 times:

http://www.koco.com/news/14973509/detail.html



We got a memo at work today telling us that a Co-worker at our Atlantic Aviation FBO in OKC was killed by walking into the prop of a PC-12. He was 26. The memo did tell us his name but I'am not going to release it in respect to the family and friends of our co-worker. Once again this just go's to show all of us in aviation to be smart.. Here is a news clip that I found a few min ago...


Matthew


GO CUBS GO!!!!!
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineDurangoMac From United States of America, joined Dec 2006, 660 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 7724 times:

If you're able to please pass on my prayers and condolences to the family.

User currently offlineOORamper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 7663 times:

Oh how sad!! God please send his family/friends my prayers.  angel   crying   weeping 

All you fellow rampers, be careful out there!!! It's dangerous!!


User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 7493 times:

What a sad thing to read about. May he rest in peace.  tombstone   angel 

User currently offlineLASOctoberB6 From Japan, joined Nov 2006, 2380 posts, RR: 1
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 8 hours ago) and read 7457 times:

It's disheartening to read up on stories like this..  down   worried   Sad


[NOT IN SERVICE] {WEStJet}
User currently offlinePC12Fan From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2378 posts, RR: 5
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 7074 times:

Wonder if it was accidental or if inexperience that was the cause? (walking into or losing balance and falling into the arch)

Regardless, it's still a tragedy.  Sad



Just when I think you've said the stupidest thing ever, you keep talkin'!
User currently offlineNWAESC From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 3372 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 7019 times:

R.I.P.


A sobering reminder of what can happen...

Everyone deserves to go home in the same condition they came in.



"Nothing ever happens here, " I said. "I just wait."
User currently offlineEZYAirbus From United Kingdom, joined Sep 2003, 2458 posts, RR: 52
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 6789 times:

Very sad to hear of a story like this I work on the ramp myself at LTN airport and it is a very dangerous place to work

Quoting PC12Fan (Reply 5):
Wonder if it was accidental or if inexperience that was the cause?

Id say that this just has to be a tragic accident, im sure the guy was very experienced at his job

New release states he was struck by the propeller whilst chocking the plane, maybe he approached from the side? At easyJet we alway approach the aircraft head on and only once the engines have spooled down and the anti collision lights switched off

Very sad indeed  Sad

Glenn



http://www.glenneldridgeaviation.com
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6486 times:



Quoting EZYAirbus (Reply 7):
New release states he was struck by the propeller whilst chocking the plane, maybe he approached from the side? At easyJet we alway approach the aircraft head on and only once the engines have spooled down and the anti collision lights switched off

Yeah, this is odd that he would approach the plane with the engines still running. The only logical thing I can think of is that he was actually UNchocking the airplane (you know the media, not reporting correctly) and it was necessary to leave the chocks in place while starting the engines, then remove them afterwards.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 13792 posts, RR: 63
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 23 hours ago) and read 6445 times:



Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 8):
Yeah, this is odd that he would approach the plane with the engines still running. The only logical thing I can think of is that he was actually UNchocking the airplane (you know the media, not reporting correctly) and it was necessary to leave the chocks in place while starting the engines, then remove them afterwards.

Or chocking the wheels with the engine running, to attach ground power afterwards.
RIP, unknown colleague.

Jan


User currently offlineOORamper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 5958 times:

We always chock our planes with the engines running. Just the nose wheels is what we do. And when dispatching the plane the engines are running when we take the chocks out.

User currently offlineBobbidooley From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 64 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 5865 times:

When I read these types of treads, I am always curious as to why the tips of props are not lit.
If the props are hollow, you mount a light in the hub that radiates out through a fiber optic cable on the tip. If the props are solid, you cast a wire within the prop and have leds on each tip and use a brush to supply them power.

Am I missing something? I figure this would add neglible weight, be a deterrent to birds, and above all- save lives.

Thoughts go out to the family.

Bobbi



Planes make me happy.
User currently offlineVHECA From Australia, joined May 2007, 262 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 5573 times:

To all the family, may you be strong for each other and accept the support around you in this sad time.

It goes without saying that anyone vaguely related to the aviation industry will have their hearts open for the family in their time of need.

And also to re-iterate a previous post. All of you on the ramps, please be careful out there!

May his body and soul Rest In Peace.

VHECA



Types Flown on - 312,320,722,732,733,73H,73W,742,743,74C,752,762,AB4,D1C,D28,DHT,F27,L11
User currently offlineDTWAGENT From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1283 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 5443 times:

May the Lord be wtih his family and co-workers at this very sad time. And my God help with the healing of sarrow with the family.

chuck


User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2127 posts, RR: 9
Reply 14, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 5348 times:



Quoting Bobbidooley (Reply 11):
When I read these types of treads, I am always curious as to why the tips of props are not lit.

It is far easier and more sensible to simply encourage practices which avoid coming into proximity of airplane danger areas in the first place. We could devise a way to eliminate or reduce every conceivable accident scenario, but at what cost? Unless people are getting injured in droves out there (they're not) we're doing the best thing possible by encouraging a corporate and general safety culture and instilling a mindset that nothing is more important than the safety of passengers and employees.
Sadly, a moment of inattention or carelessness can prove deadly.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineM180up From El Salvador, joined May 2006, 403 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 5309 times:

A really sad thing to hear, may God bless his family on this difficult time


Werner from SAL
User currently offlineAcey559 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1495 posts, RR: 2
Reply 16, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 5198 times:



Quoting Bobbidooley (Reply 11):
When I read these types of treads, I am always curious as to why the tips of props are not lit.

Most props are painted at the tips, which essentially do the same thing as lights, but not as costly. Either way, this man is in my prayers, and let it be a hard lesson learned about constant vigilance on the ramp.


User currently offlineFlybyguy From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 1798 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4598 times:

What a tragic mess. However, ramping is a hazardous job and these things are expected to happen from time to time as a sober reminders of the perils of the occupation. It's unfortunate that rampers aren't paid as much as construction workers or miners.


"Are you a pretender... or a thoroughbred?!" - Professor Matt Miller
User currently offlineBaron52ta From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 211 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 14 hours ago) and read 4410 times:

I would like to add my prayers to everyone here involved as I know how easy it is to have a lapse in concentration at the wrong time, I was lucky enough to walk away though.



 pray   tombstone 


User currently offlineYVRLTN From Canada, joined Oct 2006, 2347 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 3843 times:



Quoting Mycrj17 (Thread starter):
walking into the prop of a PC-12.



Quoting EZYAirbus (Reply 7):
we alway approach the aircraft head on



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 9):
Or chocking the wheels with the engine running

A PC12 has a single engine in the nose - it seems quite likely he did approach from the front. Not sure if you ever chock a nose wheel though?

Very sad news indeed  tombstone 



Follow me on twitter for YVR movements @vernonYVR
User currently offlinePhxpilot From United States of America, joined Jul 2005, 78 posts, RR: 2
Reply 20, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2981 times:

Unfortunately, I see this all too often when flying the PC-12. With a single PT-6 in the nose it is inherently dangerous to approach the front of the airplane while the prop is turning. Yet many rampers have it ingrained that they have to chock the front wheel instead of the mains. The nose wheel is only a couple of feet behind the prop; much too close to chock that wheel.

BTW, the external power receptacle is underneath the tail.


User currently offlineFlyboy97502 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 102 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2931 times:



Quoting YVRLTN (Reply 19):
A PC12 has a single engine in the nose - it seems quite likely he did approach from the front. Not sure if you ever chock a nose wheel though?

When I was a lineman we always chocked the nose, or chocked the mains then the nose, but the nose wheel is always a must to chock. We were always trained to wait until the props are feathered and turbines are shut down and the props are spinning down almost stopped if its a twin, but PC-12's or any single engine turboprop, one always waits till that prop is stopped.

May that Ramper/Lineman Rest In Peace, in that big lineshack in the sky. I'll be praying for his friends and family.



SKYHIGH Airlines- It's important that we get the SkyHigh message out there. That message? Thank you for your money.
User currently offlineYVRtoYYZ From Canada, joined Mar 2004, 646 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 2796 times:



Quoting EZYAirbus (Reply 7):
he was struck by the propeller whilst chocking the plane, maybe he approached from the side?



Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 8):
The only logical thing I can think of is that he was actually UNchocking the airplane (you know the media, not reporting correctly) and it was necessary to leave the chocks in place while starting the engines, then remove them afterwards.



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 9):
chocking the wheels with the engine running, to attach ground power afterwards.



Quoting OORamper (Reply 10):
We always chock our planes with the engines running. Just the nose wheels is what we do. And when dispatching the plane the engines are running when we take the chocks out.

When marshalling aircraft for departure or arrival, I chock the nose only after shutdown (if it is prop-driven - twin or single) or await engine spooldown if it is jet-propelled. The pilots can keep their feet on the brakes until the plane is shutdown.

On a PC-12, you shoulder is approx. in line with the nose wheel stut and the remainer of your body aft of that, yet you still have to reach your arm in front of the nose wheel where that prop is spinning and then get up and avoiding the hot exhaust being expelled.

Just not worth it - shut her down and then I will ensure your aircraft doesn't move.


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