Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Whats Up With Airlines And Striped Liveries?  
User currently offlineFlyvabb From India, joined Apr 2007, 63 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 4166 times:

Hey guys:

Just a quick question, atleast in India, lots of airlines have stripes as their liveries, also, lots of airlines in their earliest liveries had lots of stripes!

Is it to give the effect of speed? or movement at a fast pace?

If you notice this pic, both the Air india Express as well as the erstwhile Sahara livery have stripes on the tail or on the back fuselage.

Also, shouldnt the airline listed be "jetlite" instead of Air Sahara?


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Nitin Sarin




Up, up and away!
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 4086 times:

I believe these were called cheat lines. They were very popular for many years, until recently, where they are being replaced by more simple designs, usually white with the company logo, or curved lines. I don't think there was every really a reason for any particular design styles, they are just 'fads'. Just like clothing, cars, and anything else that has style. Times change, it's as simple as that.

User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7256 posts, RR: 17
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 13 hours ago) and read 3914 times:



Quoting Flyvabb (Thread starter):
Just a quick question, atleast in India, lots of airlines have stripes as their liveries, also, lots of airlines in their earliest liveries had lots of stripes!

When I was your age - which is sadly a long time ago now - all or nearly all major airlines had stripes in their liveries. These included AA and AC:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Terry Wall
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Jean-Pierre Bonin


AF and AI:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Peter J Gates
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence


BEA and BOAC:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © John Heggblom
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Flemming K. Fogh


and, to go closer to the end of the alphabet, PA and TW:

View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Clive Dyball
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence


It was only in around the early 1980s that what some on a.net refer to as the Euro-white liveries (because they originated in Europe with airlines like AF) that numbers of major airlines introduced liveries without one or more stripes.


User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24635 posts, RR: 86
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3803 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting VV701 (Reply 2):
all or nearly all major airlines had stripes in their liveries.

Thanks for the photos, VV701.

That's quite a trip down Memory Lane for me.  Smile

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineAviasian From Singapore, joined Jan 2001, 1483 posts, RR: 15
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3728 times:

The "red stripes" of Air India Express is supposed to be a piece of Indian fabric draped on the aircraft's rear fuselage.

Having seen the proliferation of what aviation enthusiasts have christened the "Euro-white" liveries, I am certainly pleased to see any form of colours, patterns or cheatlines on the fuselage. It is not that any one style is better than the other but just simply a wish to see greater variety and not merely a whole bunch of airlines looking like one another.

KC Sim


User currently offlineMandala499 From Indonesia, joined Aug 2001, 6590 posts, RR: 75
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 3682 times:

Simple answer... the name of companies... air line... *grin*
Comes from the nautical term... shipping line...
Ships identification were mainly in lines/linearblocks... hence aircraft too.

Yours unseriously,

Mandala499



When losing situational awareness, pray Cumulus Granitus isn't nearby !
User currently offlineOwleye From Netherlands, joined Feb 2006, 957 posts, RR: 2
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 hours ago) and read 3581 times:



Quoting Pilotboi (Reply 1):
don't think there was every really a reason for any particular design styles, they are just 'fads'. Just like clothing, cars, and anything else that has style. Times change, it's as simple as that.

The cheatline was not only a fashion thing but had the purpose to cheat the people. By painting a long fuselage line 'over the windows' planes looked as if they were very long. The quiet look of those exterior paint designs was interrupted by a small airline title above it and the tail fin design, all to achieve to let a plane look loooooonngg. In those days 'big, bigger, biggest' was an important marketing tool for airlines and a smart paint design helped with it. Look at the planes but also the advertisements of those days when spacious, comfortable and 'quiet' aircraft were very important to attract potential passengers. True nowadays big aircraft, like B747 and A380, still impress but exterior paint designs are not only in use anymore make planes look longer or wider but is now more than ever an important branding tool, a billboard for airlines.

The striping on the tail fin in combination with the fuselgae cheatline helped this plane looking long:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © AirNikon



Pan Am's livery: plane looks long, with cheatline at cabin window position:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Sunbird Photos by Don Boyd



Airbus' house almost white livery makes plane look bold, wide and spacious:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Airsnaps - WorldAirlineImages



By stopping the cheatline at the front door section Singapore Airlines makes the plane looking long aswell spacious:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Alexander Watts



Boeing's late house livery with wobbling cheatline: makes the plane look long, distinctive and modern:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Royal S King



By the way, the wall paper calendar first quarter 2008 is available at:
http://www.liladesign.com/aviation/goodies/page5.html


User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7256 posts, RR: 17
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3544 times:



Quoting Mariner (Reply 3):
Thanks for the photos, VV701.

Pleasure! I see that I am younger than you, but only by a few months! I used to see most of the aircraft pictured in my earlier reply (but not of course the AA DC-3 or the AC Viscount) when I cycled to LHR as a kid. On my first such visit I sat on the grass on the north side next to the World War 2 surplus army tent that was then the only passenger terminal at LHR. I was separated from what is now the 27R / 09L runway by no more than a three foot high oak paling fence and a hundred yards of grass with no security and only the Strats, Connies and Dakotas to worry about. As you say,

Quoting Mariner (Reply 3):
Memory Lane

Then they opened what is now T2 followed by the second terminal that seemed to be much too large and very, very spacious. This is now the very overcrowded and cramped departure hall of T3. Yes. Those were the days!


User currently offlineSandyb123 From UK - Scotland, joined Oct 2007, 1039 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 hours ago) and read 3490 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

Doesn''t it have something to do with the technology involved in painting aircraft? With modern facilities and computers they can design more complex liveries if required which are then copied into pre-cut templates and painted or applied to the aircraft? However, I don't think these are applied as vinyl or plastic coverings because of the weight penalty?

E.g the Virgin signature on their tails is applied by a pre-cut template sprayed over.

Sandyb123



DC3, 727, 737, 744, 753, 777, A32X, A345, A388, ERJ145, E190, BaE146, D328, ATR72, Q400
User currently offlineJetMARC From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 543 posts, RR: 2
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3462 times:

The stripes were called "cheatlines" for a reason - it was easy to paint a simple line down the side of the fuselage. In stead of painting the entire aircraft or complicated design, they "cheated" by only paiting a line down the side of an aircraft which gave it the appearance of a finished look and saving on time and weight. Now, with the advancement of lighter aircraft materials and paiting processes, the industry has "cheated" even further but simply paiting most paint schemes white (euro-white livery) because it's faster and easier.

(For example, Air India almost got ride of the 'palace windows' because it takes a lot of time to decorate each individual window)



"Sucka, I'm gonna send you out on Knuckle Airlines. Fist Class!!" ~ Mr. T
User currently offlineCEO@AFG From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 244 posts, RR: 3
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3442 times:

Owleye,

where did the Aviation livery blog go? I stopped by Liladesign to get a professional airline branders view on new liveries from time to time. It was refreshing to get a good reasoned opinion on a new livery as opposed to the hate it love it camps that usually spring up at A.net whenever a new livery shows up.



"Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue." Steven McCroskey, Airplane!
User currently offlineMariner From New Zealand, joined Nov 2001, 24635 posts, RR: 86
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3272 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting VV701 (Reply 7):
Pleasure! I see that I am younger than you, but only by a few months!

Ah, sorry - I haven't updated my profile. I'm older than it says. I was born in 1940 at the Imperial Airways flying boat station at Tiberias, Palestine - my British father was an engineer for Imperial.

Quoting VV701 (Reply 7):
Then they opened what is now T2 followed by the second terminal that seemed to be much too large and very, very spacious.

Terminals?

When I first flew out of LHR, check-in was in a canvas marquee, with duckboards on the ground so our feet didn't get too muddy.  Smile

mariner



aeternum nauta
User currently offlineDtwclipper From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 12, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 3258 times:



Quoting VV701 (Reply 2):
It was only in around the early 1980s that what some on a.net refer to as the Euro-white liveries (because they originated in Europe with airlines like AF) that numbers of major airlines introduced liveries without one or more stripes.

Actually AirWest in the US had a "euro white" design well before AF.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bob Garrard



User currently offlineOwlEye From Netherlands, joined Feb 2006, 957 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 3171 times:



Quoting CEO@AFG (Reply 10):
where did the Aviation livery blog go? I stopped by Liladesign to get a professional airline branders view on new liveries from time to time. It was refreshing to get a good reasoned opinion on a new livery as opposed to the hate it love it camps that usually spring up at A.net whenever a new livery shows up.

CEO@AFG,

The airline branding weblog will make a come back on the Lila Design website soon. Thanks for letting me know you like it.

Regards,
Owleye


User currently offlineCitationJet From United States of America, joined Mar 2003, 2368 posts, RR: 3
Reply 14, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 3091 times:

Another example of how the "cheatline" was used to "cheat". Some DC-4 cheatlines were painted to make the DC-4 round windows look like square windows of the DC-6.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Sterling E Weaver
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Bob Garrard
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mike Freer - Touchdown-aviation


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Peter Seemann
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Snorre - VAP



View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Gerard Helmer


[Edited 2008-01-06 16:08:52]

[Edited 2008-01-06 16:25:06]


Boeing Flown: 701,702,703;717;720;721,722;731,732,733,734,735,737,738,739;741,742,743,744,747SP;752,753;762,763;772,773.
User currently offlineOwleye From Netherlands, joined Feb 2006, 957 posts, RR: 2
Reply 15, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 2910 times:



Quoting CEO@AFG (Reply 10):
Owleye,

where did the Aviation livery blog go? I stopped by Liladesign to get a professional airline branders view on new liveries from time to time. It was refreshing to get a good reasoned opinion on a new livery as opposed to the hate it love it camps that usually spring up at A.net whenever a new livery shows up.

Aviation Branding Weblog is available again but now at:

http://www.liladesign.com/aviation/airlinebrandingweblog/page6.php


User currently offlineCEO@AFG From Norway, joined Jan 2001, 244 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 5 days 2 hours ago) and read 2842 times:

Thanks for letting me know Owleye  Smile


"Looks like I picked the wrong week to quit sniffing glue." Steven McCroskey, Airplane!
User currently offlineRikkus67 From Canada, joined Jun 2000, 1577 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 4 days 21 hours ago) and read 2725 times:



Quoting CitationJet (Reply 14):
Another example of how the "cheatline" was used to "cheat". Some DC-4 cheatlines were painted to make the DC-4 round windows look like square windows of the DC-6.

This is the exact reason for the term "cheat-line". As airlines were upgrading their equipment from DC-4's to DC-6's, airlines with the older DC-4's came up with the idea to visually trick the passenger into believing they were flying a more modern aircraft. In essence, the airlines were "cheating", hence the origin of the term. Simply painting squares over the oval windows would have been too obvious, so the use of the coloured band helped to hide the "visual modification"...

I wonder how many passengers that were fooled by the crafty artwork complained when they sat down...only to look out an oval instead of square window?

Of note is the Canadair Northstar. This was a heavily modified DC-4, using RR Merlin engines. As the DC-6 was already into production (IIRC), they used the window frames from the DC-6 on the DC-4 fuselage:


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mel Lawrence




AC.WA.CP.DL.RW.CO.WG.WJ.WN.KI.FL.SK.ACL.UA.US.F9
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Whats Up With Vanguard Airlines posted Fri Dec 28 2001 20:43:19 by Elal106
Whats Up With LGW This Evening? posted Sat Dec 1 2007 12:41:21 by Express1
Zantop L-188s At YIP, Whats Up With Them? posted Sun Nov 11 2007 13:37:03 by Falstaff
Whats Up With The 'NGP'? posted Sun Sep 30 2007 01:34:52 by KochamLOT
Whats Up With BAG Air? posted Sat Jun 16 2007 07:04:17 by A380fo
Whats Up With F9 In LAX posted Wed Feb 14 2007 19:18:41 by CALMSP
Whats Up With Innacurate Segment Mileages At NWA? posted Sun Jan 21 2007 21:23:57 by KDTWFlyer
Whats Up With This Fokker? (photo) posted Wed Oct 18 2006 18:46:14 by Airfoilsguy
World Airline Fleets News -whats Up With Them? posted Wed Sep 20 2006 00:40:49 by NA
Whats Up With DL Fl# 34 ATL To JNB? posted Sun Aug 20 2006 04:54:54 by Jumbojet