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US Airways Refund Question  
User currently offlineCOEWRNJ From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 1064 posts, RR: 19
Posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 3411 times:

My brother was flying EWR-CLT-AUA this morning 1/6/08 and upon arrival into CLT was informed that the flight to AUA has been canceled due to an oil leak. They said they couldn't get him there until Tuesday so they put him on a flight back to EWR. He asked for a refund and they declined because they said that they were offering him other options. Isn't US Airways obligated to give him a refund? I booked him on the CO non-stop tomorrow morning because this was a short trip to begin with but I'm pretty sure US Airways is obligated to refund the ticket. Am I wrong? Not sure what the procedure is. From what my brother is telling me the service in CLT was awful. He is 21 and not one to complain unless it really warrants it.

When i called US they said that reservations can't handle that and that I need to call customer care. When I called them they were closed. I'm just asking so when I call them tomorrow I don't look like an idiot.


Thanks for the help!

Dave

15 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineANCFlyer From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 3402 times:

Dispute the charge on the credit card.

"Other Options" don't include waiting two days . . . .


User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2129 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 3399 times:



Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 1):
Dispute the charge on the credit card.

Good advice. Dave, if your brother hasn't done this already, do so with his card issuer prior to calling the airline. They have reneged on their half of your implied contract, so they are obligated to issue a full refund.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineCOEWRNJ From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 1064 posts, RR: 19
Reply 3, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 3386 times:

That's what I thought. Ahh the fun I've had with US over the years. lol.

Quoting ANCFlyer (Reply 1):
"Other Options" don't include waiting two days . . . .

Especially when the trip is four days to begin with. Leave it to US.


User currently offlineTUIflyer From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2008, 206 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3355 times:

Try talking to an agent at usairways.com and see if they can direct you any better, other than that I think there's an e-mail address that goes direct to Doug Parker's people if you have any more issues with US.

Your brother did however agree to the conditions of contract with US when he purchased the ticket.

'Carrier undertakes to use its best efforts to carry the passenger and baggage with reasonable dispatch. Times shown in timetable or elsewhere are not guaranteed and form no part of this contract. Carrier may, without notice, substitute alternate carriers or aircraft, and may alter or omit stopping place shown on the ticket in case of necessity. Schedules are subject to change without notice. Carrier assumes no responsibility for making connections.'

US did offer your brother an alternative; although it was'nt a very good one. Hope this helps!

TUIflyer



Don't just travel, travel with a smile. . .
User currently offlineDeltAirlines From United States of America, joined May 1999, 8894 posts, RR: 12
Reply 5, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 11 hours ago) and read 3347 times:

douglas.parker@usairways.com is Dougie's e-mail address I believe. There's plenty of more US Airways exec e-mail addresses over at FlyerTalk.

Dispute the charge though with the credit card company...it's a crock of BS that US Airways couldn't get him there till Tuesday - since it's not a weather cancellation, they could have Rule 240'd him over to another airline. At this time of year, there should be seats available to AUA on other airlines - AA has a few daily AUA-MIA flights that could have been easily booked onto; it's plenty easy to get him to MIA from CLT (either on US or AA).


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13518 posts, RR: 62
Reply 6, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 3304 times:
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Quoting DeltAirlines (Reply 5):
Dispute the charge though with the credit card company...

Bad idea.

See, if he disputes the charge, he's saying he never got what he paid for. In this case, a ticket.

Not travel on such and such day to X, Y, or Z - a ticket.

Which he has.

So the card company will check with the airline, find it was a valid charge (a ticket was issued, and it wasn't fraud) and the dispute will be dismissed by the card issuer.


Having said that, any airline worth their salt would offer a full refund if they couldn't operate the flight as planned due to a mechanical problem, crew rest issues, etc - something that was within their control. It's a little different when it's weather or something else beyond thier immediate control.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineHPAEAA From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1024 posts, RR: 1
Reply 7, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 3277 times:



Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 6):
See, if he disputes the charge, he's saying he never got what he paid for. In this case, a ticket.

Not travel on such and such day to X, Y, or Z - a ticket.

Which he has.

Not true, the when purchasing a product from an airline, they are entering into a contract to provide the future service - i.e. to fly between Point A and B on a specified date.

Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 6):
So the card company will check with the airline, find it was a valid charge (a ticket was issued, and it wasn't fraud) and the dispute will be dismissed by the card issuer.


Having said that, any airline worth their salt would offer a full refund if they couldn't operate the flight as planned due to a mechanical problem, crew rest issues, etc - something that was within their control. It's a little different when it's weather or something else beyond thier immediate control.

Even in weather situations I've seen a number of refunds...



Why do I fly???
User currently offlineUafedexflyboy From United States of America, joined Nov 2003, 33 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 3252 times:

I don't know what the agent was thinking but you ARE entitled to a refund of the ticket, even if the ticket is non-refundable. It is what we call a futile trip. For whatever reason we cannot get you to your desitnation in a period of time that you consider reasonable thus making the trip futile for you. In this situation you have 3 options:

1. You are sent back to where you came from, in this case EWR, and rebooked for the next available flight.

2. You are sent back and you are given the option to use the full value of your ticket towards the purchase of another ticket at a later date.

3. You are sent back and given a refund (NOT at the airport) for the full value of your ticket.

Either way you look at it, we are obligated to give a refund to your brother for the full value of his ticket if he so requests.

(If anyone is interested, I work for US Airways at an internal help desk which includes quoting policy all the time.)


User currently offlineBridogger6 From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 710 posts, RR: 10
Reply 9, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3177 times:

I also work as a US ticket agent in PHX. You should have no problem getting a refund for the ticket, you weren't able to get there in a reasonable amount of time, making the trip pointless, they will get you a refund, sorry, you're just not talking to the right people.

Now the only thing that seems a bit fishy to me is you said you booked your brother on the CO nonstop for the morning... why didn't you just present this as an option to the US ticket agents if it was just something that they failed to see as an option? If CO had seats, the agents in CLT would have gladly booked him on the CO flight at no extra cost to you...

Agents aren't always perfect, they don't always find or pull up all possible routings, so if you think you've found something, bring it to their attention... You could have just had the agents roll your ticket over to CO since it was maintenance related issue.


User currently offlineEA CO AS From United States of America, joined Nov 2001, 13518 posts, RR: 62
Reply 10, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3176 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting HPAEAA (Reply 7):
Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 6):
See, if he disputes the charge, he's saying he never got what he paid for. In this case, a ticket.

Not travel on such and such day to X, Y, or Z - a ticket.

Which he has.

Not true, the when purchasing a product from an airline, they are entering into a contract to provide the future service - i.e. to fly between Point A and B on a specified date.

Irrelevant to the charge dispute process. It would be refused.

Quoting HPAEAA (Reply 7):

Even in weather situations I've seen a number of refunds...

As have I - but technically speaking, the airline isn't obligated to do so.

Most will offer anyway, but they're not required to.



"In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem - government IS the problem." - Ronald Reagan
User currently offlineM180up From El Salvador, joined May 2006, 403 posts, RR: 5
Reply 11, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3166 times:

As UAfedexflyboy said that is called a futile trip, reservations agents cannot actually process the refund, but they can scalate the call to the proper department (this department is available 24/7), in any case your brother could have been protected with other airline due to rule 240.
Anyhow the airline contract stipulates we dont guarantee any other than taking you from point A to B, dates, aircraft, seat, times are not guaranteed.
The airline is not obligated to refund tickets, but will do in some circumstances. Airlines have rule 240 as part of the contract as a customer service, but they are not required to do it.


Given this, you can get a refund due to futile trip, but nor reservations agents or airport agents would be able to issue it, you can contact reservations and try to get transferred to a supervisor or someone above so they can contact the proper department

[Edited 2008-01-06 20:26:17]


Werner from SAL
User currently offlineCOEWRNJ From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 1064 posts, RR: 19
Reply 12, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3146 times:



Quoting Bridogger6 (Reply 9):
hy didn't you just present this as an option to the US ticket agents if it was just something that they failed to see as an option? If CO had seats, the agents in CLT would have gladly booked him on the CO flight at no extra cost to you...

I wasn't there but I did tell him to ask the agent for that and he told me that they said to him, "these are your options." As I said, I wasn''t there so I don't know word for word what was said. I personally would have pushed harder on this one.

Quoting M180up (Reply 11):
Anyhow the airline contract stipulates we dont guarantee any other than taking you from point A to B, dates, aircraft, seat, times are not guaranteed.
The airline is not obligated to refund tickets, but will do in some circumstances. Airlines have rule 240 as part of the contract as a customer service, but they are not required to do it.

This I did not know.

Learning new things every day.  Smile


User currently offlineAnalog From United States of America, joined Jul 2006, 1900 posts, RR: 1
Reply 13, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3137 times:



Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 6):
See, if he disputes the charge, he's saying he never got what he paid for. In this case, a ticket.

Not travel on such and such day to X, Y, or Z - a ticket.

What are you getting? An email from the airline? That's a really cool business, selling emails costing hundreds of dollars.

What's next? Car dealers selling titles to piles of scrap metal?


User currently offlineHPAEAA From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1024 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3131 times:



Quoting EA CO AS (Reply 10):
As have I - but technically speaking, the airline isn't obligated to do so.

Most will offer anyway, but they're not required to.

not saying it's a matter of law, but rather the Clearing agencies (Mastercard, AMEX, VISA, Discover) have stricter standards in place.. Generally the consumer protections are there and would keep the burden of proof on the businesses to prove the goods/services were rendered...



Why do I fly???
User currently offlineM180up From El Salvador, joined May 2006, 403 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (6 years 6 months 4 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 3118 times:

Quoting COEWRNJ (Reply 12):
This I did not know.

Learning new things every day

Rule 240 was a U.S. federal requirement prior to airline deregulation in 1978. It was one of the many stipulations that existed prior to deregulation - the U.S. government obligated airlines to abide by a set of rules regarding the transport of passengers and the rights of passengers. Rule 240 has remained in existence because after deregulation most airlines continued to respect the 'old rules'.

Because Rule 240 deals with cancellations and delays, it is probably the best known of any 'rules' pertaining to the airline industry. What makes defining Rule 240 so troublesome is that since the deregulation of the U.S. airline industry Rule 240 is not a federal requirement. Therefore, if the airline has submitted the rule in their respective contracts (also conditions) of carriage (the ticket is a contractual agreement that an airline and passenger enter regarding the transport of a passenger) then the airline has a Rule 240, but it doesn't have to.

A common misconception is that all airlines are required to have a Rule 240, but they do not.

Taken from: http://airtravel.about.com/cs/delays/a/rule240_1.htm and
http://airtravel.about.com/cs/delays/a/rule240_2.htm

Edit:
This other link could also be useful to understant how rule 240 works: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20696593/

[Edited 2008-01-06 21:01:45]


Werner from SAL
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