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F/As Involved In Accidents Like Heathrow 777  
User currently offlineBaldguy From Canada, joined May 2001, 148 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3470 times:

It's always struck me how, in the aftermath of airplane crashes, one never sees the cabin crew interviewed afterwards. As eyewitnesses they would probably understand better the event than pax; plus their skill and courage is responsible in no small part for the passengers' being evacuated safely. I know that airlines probably want to have only an official spokesman making statements to the media; does anyone know of any other reasons why we never hear from the flight attendants? Personally, I think that insisting that only an "official" voice is heard stinks of spin control and concerns about liability. If we heard from the flight attendants I think it would have a positive effect on how the public feels about the importance of respecting the cabin crew when it comes to safety.

8 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4755 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3469 times:

Even in normal circumstances, a cabin crew is not allowed to speak on behalf of the airline to the press unless prior permission is sought. What's more after an event like this crash!


Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
User currently offlineSafetyDemo From United States of America, joined exactly 7 years ago today! , 310 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3434 times:

Not only are we not allowed to speak to the press at anytime (even on good days...), after an accident, all crew-members are subject to drug-testing, interviews with the airline, probably the NTSB and I'm sure the FAA is scheduled in there somewhere (...or JAA, other regulating body, etc). Not to mention being sent off to a hospital to be checked out by medical personnel, if not done at the scene.

safetyDemo



Please direct your attention to the flight attendants in the cabin...
User currently offlineXtoler From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3336 times:

We just can't be asked on the scene for an incident. Eventually, you may here from the crew, if there is still interest in the story. Chances are you will here from the cabin crew first, as they aren't under the scrutiny as the pilots are as far as what really caused the accident. Of course all you are going to hear or what the F/A's are allowed to talk about are there actions after the incident. And with that, statements have to get a go ahead from who ever does the accident investigations, and of course permission from the airline. As much as people would like instant information on what happened, there can't be anyone making speculations about the incident that would cloud the investigation. As funny as this may seem but can you imagine an F/A with a grudge against the pilots or the airline going up in front of the camaras soon after this happens and the F/A says, "The pilot was a F***ing moron! That's why we crashed! And this airline sucks, they don't pay me enough for this crap...." As much as the press and the readers would love an emotional response from an employee, it pulls away from the real story and what really happened.

Knock on wood, I've only had close calls, but never had to evacuate, and luckily never had press around after an IFE. The main thing going through my mind is getting everyone to safety, saving people I can, and then the paperwork and debriefings I have to go through. Once you get through all that, the adrenaline is down to normal levels, the thought process is a little more coherent, then with permission you can give a press statement.

Think of it this way, if you've ever been in a car wreck, even if it's not you're fault, how are you going to react to the policeman asking you questions? So much has happened in such a short time your emotions take over and you really can't give an actual account of what really happened. Of course, the other person or witnesses will give a different account of what happened.

It will be a while if at all we here from the cabin crew. If we're lucky the press will have interest in the story months longer and maybe we'll hear from the pilots. Until then, don't get your hopes up.



EMB145 F/A, F/E, J41 F/A, F/E, because my wife clipped my wings, armchair captain
User currently offlineBennett123 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2004, 7615 posts, RR: 3
Reply 4, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 3075 times:

I think that in most industries staff would need company consent before making work related comments to media. One of the pluses about unions is that the rep has more room to manoevre, (especially if employed by the Union).

Most companies in Financial services would insist that all media comment is made through or sanctioned by PR.

IMO that is a dam good thing, they have the training for it, do'nt take it personally and hopefully wo'nt put their foot in it.


User currently offlineNzrich From New Zealand, joined Dec 2005, 1522 posts, RR: 1
Reply 5, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 3026 times:

Yes as a lot of contracts say including mine i have to refer all questions from the media etc to the public relations department and they will make any official comment as i am not allowed to ..


"Pride of the pacific"
User currently offlineXtoler From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 11 hours ago) and read 2969 times:



Quoting Bennett123 (Reply 4):
IMO that is a dam good thing, they have the training for it, do'nt take it personally and hopefully wo'nt put their foot in it.

That is what we pay PR people for. I'd much rather be hailed in a human interest story of building the 3 story beer bong for MHZ's '91 Air Fete, than doing my actual job. I'm still waiting for the USAF to come up with a ribbon for that, and I bet I could at least get a bronze ane silver oak leaf on my party experience.

We train for it, sometimes I don't think we do enough in the civilian side for training and I definately found holes in our CRM training for my last employer. Then again who's going to try to hijack an ERJ? Anyone remember the moron a few years ago tried to hijack an ERJ from EWR to Australia? They diverted to IAD. My wife and some of my friends saw that on the news and went ballistic, telling me I should quit being an F/A. Hell with that, I was workling in a chemical plant with a bunch of pissed off, job scared construction workers. As a teen I was also in the Carson, VA volunteer fire department, and to get really trivial and tiffling, in US Army JROTC at Prince George High School where we learned a lot about surviivabilty and life saving. Those skills followed me into the USAF with "self aid and buddy care". A certificate from the Red Cross in life saving techniques help a lot too. Had about 8 years of NBC training, certified. I never thought of those skills, I just wanted to fly and get paid for it.

Maybe we are the "unseen" unless someone complains for bad service. As an F/A I've had plenty of pax telling me about their trials and tirbulations in the terminal. Before I was an F/A I was on the back side and I can really empathaze with the pax. That two weeks in USAF 60535 training helped that too.

In summary, dont' knock the F/A's. Yes, it is the PIC's final decision on what really goes on, but as far as the cabin goes, that is my domain and if there are any problems I will let the PIC know.



EMB145 F/A, F/E, J41 F/A, F/E, because my wife clipped my wings, armchair captain
User currently offlineAirEMS From United States of America, joined May 2004, 684 posts, RR: 3
Reply 7, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 2 days ago) and read 2491 times:



Quoting Baldguy (Thread starter):
If we heard from the flight attendants I think it would have a positive effect on how the public feels about the importance of respecting the cabin crew when it comes to safety.

See (Unsung Heros!) for further reference

-Carl



If Your Dying Were Flying
User currently onlineSXDFC From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 2356 posts, RR: 21
Reply 8, posted (6 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 2379 times:

The other night on Katie Couric's evening news they showed the crew of BA 038 in London, both the Captain and the First Officer ( who I presume was the pilot flying ) during the crash both still looked somewhat scared, well at least the First Officer did!


ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
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