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Ever Wondered About Code Share?  
User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4755 posts, RR: 26
Posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 11114 times:

Hi all,

I was wondering to myself "What does code share mean?". I am sure we have all seen the departure screens on the airport and are familar with one flight operated by an aircraft on an airline but sometimes carries several other airline's flight numbers.

So what exactly does it entail and what are the mechanics behind a "code share"?

I am sure forum members will be more than happy and enthusiastic to share what they know. So fire away...!


Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
48 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlinePilotboi From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2366 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 11102 times:

I'm pretty sure it's fairly simple. One airline "sells" seats to another airline and let's them sell them to their own customers. I believe it makes it easier for the booking system of the airline that is selling to the customer. That's a short explanation.

User currently offlineAA7295 From Australia, joined Aug 2007, 620 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 11089 times:

Hi Ryanair!!

Basically a codeshare allows on flight to be marketed by numerous other airlines. I believe it was invented by AA to codeshare on QF flights to USA and back to combat UA as they didn't have the metal to do it themselves. For Example, AA codeshares with Qantas on the route BNE-LAX, the QF flight number is QF175 whereas the AA flight number is AA7295. It allows AA to market flight AA7295 as their own flight, therby making more money instead of palming it off to QF. This allows AA FF's and passengers to have same carrier code, and allows travel agents less hassle by booking with one airline.

It also allows airlines to have a perceived increase in frequencies on some route. For example both SQ and LH fly SIN-FRA. And they also codeshare on each other's flights, thereby having more frequency.

When using a codeshare, usually on your ticket you will see an "OPERATED BY" to let you know what carrier's metal you are using. For Example, my tickets say "American Airlines AA7295 Operated by Qantas Airways" (hence my username).

Something that has always puzzled me, is why UA & SQ don't codeshare? Does anyone know?

Hope this helps,
AA7295

[Edited 2008-02-28 20:29:52]

[Edited 2008-02-28 20:30:30]

User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11559 posts, RR: 61
Reply 3, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 21 hours ago) and read 11073 times:

Codesharing is essentially a very simple concept.

At its most basic form, codesharing simply allows one airline to expand the scope of the network it can market to customers through marketing flights operated by partner airlines as its own. For example, AA does not want to fly to Budapest, Hungary, itself, but it still wants to sell seats to Hungary to customers as if AA did fly there. So, to solve this problem, AA "codeshares" on MALEV's daily flight from JFK to Budapest. The plane is MALEV's. The crew, service and facilities are MALEV's. And the flight carries a MALEV flight number (MA091) as the flight is operated fully by MALEV. However, the flight also carries an AA flight number (AA7260).

So, in essence, AA could sell a customer a ticket from DFW to JFK on AA, and JFK to BUD on MALEV, but call it AA (in terms of flight numbers) the whole way to BUD. This may seem trivial, or even disingenuous, but experience has shown over the last 20 years that codesharing can be immensely helpful in building a marketing and schedule presence for airlines in markets where they would never be willing and/or able to operate their own flights.

The concept of codeshare - in one form or another - has been around for decades. In the 1950s, U.S. carriers engaged extensively in the practice of "interchanges." Delta, for example, would fly a plane with Delta customers from Atlanta to Dallas (with numerous stops in between), and then in Dallas would exchange those passengers with AA who would carry them onward to Los Angeles and the west. At the time - at the height of regulation - AA was not able to fly east to Atlanta, and Delta didn't have the right to fly from Dallas to Los Angeles. But by combining their networks, both could expand their network's reach and open up new markets to their service. Codesharing serves essentially the same purpose. And yes, I believe that AA and QANTAS was the first iteration of the modern conception of "codesharing" as we know it today, when one airline (not owned or operating on behalf of the other) operated flights carrying the code of another airline. AA-QF started codesharing in 1988.


User currently offlineJetdeltamsy From United States of America, joined Nov 2000, 2987 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 20 hours ago) and read 11040 times:

Don't get me started. Code-sharing is deceptive marketing at its best.

Code-share enables carriers to charge through fares instead of point to point. The same thing was accomplished for 30 years before code-sharing came about called "joint fares". With joint fares, you knew whose airplane you were flying on. The code-share stuff is confusing to customers and employees alike.'



Tired of airline bankruptcies....EA/PA/TW and finally DL.
User currently offlineLeskova From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 6075 posts, RR: 70
Reply 5, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 10979 times:



Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 5):
Code-share enables carriers to charge through fares instead of point to point.

They can do that without codesharing.

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 5):
The same thing was accomplished for 30 years before code-sharing came about called "joint fares". With joint fares, you knew whose airplane you were flying on.

The same thing is still done today.

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 5):
The code-share stuff is confusing to customers and employees alike.'

Most have, pretty much, understood the concept by now... then again, it might help that, at least in Germany (and I think in all of Europe - don't know about the rest of the world), full disclosure of the operating carrier is a legal requirement, and that's before the customer decides to even take the ticket.



Smile - it confuses people!
User currently offlineNYC2theworld From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 664 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 10954 times:



Quoting Leskova (Reply 6):
Most have, pretty much, understood the concept by now... then again, it might help that, at least in Germany (and I think in all of Europe - don't know about the rest of the world), full disclosure of the operating carrier is a legal requirement, and that's before the customer decides to even take the ticket.

I don't know if its law in the US, but all the major booking sites such as Expedia, Orbitz and Travelocity will tell you before booking on the itinerary selection page what airline will be doing the actual flying. They even do it for flights on regional partners saying something to the effect that the flight is operated by "Express Jet DBA Continental Express" for example.



Always wonderers if this "last and final boarding call" is in fact THE last and final boarding call.
User currently offlineGrozzy From Australia, joined Oct 2007, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 10945 times:

Ive booked a trip to Europe and back from Sydney, flying QF BA and AF but all with QF flight numbers. Can someone give an explanation why Ive got two identical reservations with different reference numbers? When I enquired with QF bookings, they assured me this was normal with multiple carriers but I still couldnt make sense of it.

User currently offlineSkyguyB727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 8, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 16 hours ago) and read 10875 times:

The whole concept of code sharing came about because of bias in airline reservation systems used by travel agents. Nonstop and direct flights would appear first; online connections would appear on the next screen. After going through every possible online connection, the computer would then show interline connections. Airlines did studies and found that most travel agents booked flights off the first or second screen of availability. By "code sharing," an interline connection would appear in the computer as an online connection. It would, thereby, appear on one of the first availability displays.

The first large scale code sharing that AA did was with Canadian Airlines. AA plowed millions of dollars into Canadian's operation. Canadian dumped Pegasus and switched to SABRE.

Federal law in the United States requires full disclosure of who is actually operating a particular flight. The airline agent or travel agent is required to make that disclosure at the first discussion of a flight schedule involving a code share.

What's odd about code share arrangements is that one can see competitors codesharing with each other. MX and AM are the best examples of that.


User currently offlineNighthawk From UK - Scotland, joined Sep 2001, 5136 posts, RR: 33
Reply 9, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 10850 times:

How does this work out financially for the airlines?

Does an airline take a block of seats for a set fee, which they then sell on at a profit if possible, or do they just earn comission per seat sold?



That'll teach you
User currently offlineKiwiandrew From New Zealand, joined Jun 2005, 8552 posts, RR: 13
Reply 10, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 10831 times:
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Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 10):
How does this work out financially for the airlines?

it varies from airline to airline and sometimes even from route to route - details are usually not public - but a few years ago someone explained to me how for example the BA/QF JSA between Australia and UK/Europe works ( or at least how it was working at that time ) - essentially all revenue is pooled and allocated according to the share of the total capacity offered by each airline - unless this has changed there is no difference to the revenue QF receives from a QF number on QF metal , or a QF number on BA metal , or a BA number of QF metal or a BA number on BA metal - if QF if offering say , 55% of the total capacity under the JSA then it will receive 55% of the revenue in each of the above scenarios - please note that this only applies to the JSA flights - other BA/QF codeshares have quite a different arrangement - eg AKL-LAX BA flight number is for marketing purposes only - all revenue for that sector goes to QF . As I said earlier this information dates from a few years ago but it gives an indication of some of the possibilities .

In other cases an airline might have an allocation of a certain number of seats ( I believe that this is the case with the QF/SA codeshares JNB-PER and JNB-SYD ) and that each airline can do as it wishes with its own allocation .

I believe it is quite common for Star Alliance members to have a sort of freesell arrangement on certain routes - from what I understand any partner can sell any number of seats drawn from the common pool on a first in , first served basis - in theory for example AC could sell every single seat on an NZ operated AKL-YVR flight ( I dont know if this arrangement actually applies to this route - I am just using it as an example )

In a few cases - and I think this is quite rare , in fact I cant think of an example , an airline can even have a specific allocation of seat numbers - eg a given range of rows where all the pax will be ticketed on airline X


There are probably a number of other arrangements that I am not aware of - and to further complicate things sometimes the agreements may apply in one cabin but not others - this particularly applies when there is a major disparity between the products offered - to go back to the BA/QF examples above - BA for a time offered true flat beds in Business while QF still had the old Dreamtime seats ( and even now QF only have sloping beds while BA have already moved on to their second generation of flat beds ) BA have had WT+ ( premium economy ) for a number of years while QF are only now in the process of introducing their premium economy .

In summary - there are so many different ways for codeshares to work ( and most airlines keep the exact arrangements between themselves ) that it is pretty hard for the average person to do much more than guess at the workings of any given codeshare


PS do you know feel more confused than when you first asked ?



Moderation in all things ... including moderation ;-)
User currently offlineTango-Bravo From United States of America, joined Jun 2001, 3805 posts, RR: 29
Reply 11, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10664 times:



Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 4):
Don't get me started. Code-sharing is deceptive marketing at its best.

 checkmark  Interestingly enough, since reply 2 notes that AA is given "credit" for inventing codeshare... It was none other than Bob Crandall who, in the mid-1990s, was quoted as saying "codeshares are deceptive." Those words are no less true today, except that the deception has since proliferated immensely. Besides being utterly deceptive, codeshare has become nothing less than a form of legalized collusion that has allowed airlines to re-write the definition/intent of anti-trust law to eliminate competition.

What is especially fraudelent, albeit legalized, are "local market codeshares" where airline A books and tickets flight itineraries operated entirely by airline B. Which also makes for especially poor customer service and confusion in any number of ways.

And, by the way, as for the "seamless travel experience" advertised by codesharing airlines? That is, well... as deceptive as the codeshare concept itself. For those who doubt, once again I can only wish that you could spend a few hours on the job with me listening to callers who have discovered first hand that codeshare is anything but seamless.


User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11559 posts, RR: 61
Reply 12, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10650 times:



Quoting Tango-Bravo (Reply 12):
Interestingly enough, since reply 2 notes that AA is given "credit" for inventing codeshare... It was none other than Bob Crandall who, in the mid-1990s, was quoted as saying "codeshares are deceptive."

Very true. Crandall was - at first - a very staunch opponent of what he saw as a very deceptive and anti-competitive practice. But, like any good leader, who quickly adapted to the changing dynamics on the ground and ultimately led AA to become an early and passionate advocate of codesharing-type partnerships. Although, if you look at the last two decades, AA has still historically been one of the more skeptical airlines when it comes to deep, large-scale codesharing arrangements. Whereas the inclination of some other large U.S. airlines has been to delve very deeply into sweeping, massive codesharing arrangements with foreign partners, AA has generally preferred far more targeted, limited codesharing that serves exactly the marketing/schedule presence needs that it has, but not one bit more.

Quoting Tango-Bravo (Reply 12):
What is especially fraudelent, albeit legalized, are "local market codeshares" where airline A books and tickets flight itineraries operated entirely by airline B.

Indeed, although in that sense, the ticketing airline is essentially just acting as an agent on behalf of the operating airline. The operating airline may still run the flight, but the ticket is issued on the issuing airlines stock, and the flight coupons are still controlled by the issuer. In that sense, it's really no more disingenuous than a package tour operator, or a charter airline.


User currently offlineA330323X From United States of America, joined Oct 2003, 3039 posts, RR: 44
Reply 13, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10647 times:



Quoting Commavia (Reply 3):
And yes, I believe that AA and QANTAS was the first iteration of the modern conception of "codesharing" as we know it today, when one airline (not owned or operating on behalf of the other) operated flights carrying the code of another airline. AA-QF started codesharing in 1988.

I believe that the Allegheny-Henson codeshare predates that by several decades, starting in 1967. While Henson operated as Allegheny Commuter, Allegheny did not own the airline, nor did they make route or pricing decisions.



I'm the expert on here on two things, neither of which I care about much anymore.
User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11559 posts, RR: 61
Reply 14, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 8 hours ago) and read 10612 times:



Quoting A330323X (Reply 14):
I believe that the Allegheny-Henson codeshare predates that by several decades, starting in 1967. While Henson operated as Allegheny Commuter, Allegheny did not own the airline, nor did they make route or pricing decisions.

That's what I mean, though - I don't really consider that a "codeshare" in the modern sense that we think of it today. I think Henson/Allegheny Commuter was definitely the forerunner of today's regional partner brands/operations (American Eagle, Delta Connection, United Express, etc.), it isn't really an example of codesharing as we now think of it, precisely because Henson was primarily operating under the Allegheny brand, and not independent of it.

On the other hand, today's iteration of the idea of a "codeshare" much more involves two airlines, with two distinct and different brand identities, who retain their distinct and different brand identities throughout the arrangement, but still market each others' flights as their own, irrespective of separate brands. In that sense, I do believe - though I very well could be wrong - that AA and QANTAS were among the first, if not the first, to pioneer that sort of arrangement.


User currently offlineBrianDromey From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 3920 posts, RR: 9
Reply 15, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 10577 times:

To be honest, I dont find code-shares all that confusing. I've noticed that a carriers own flights tend to have two or three digits, BUT a code share has four. Now this also includes regional partners as well. Of course, it does not always apply, eg LX 1824 is ZRH-ATH, operated by LX, usually with A321.

But the 4 digit rule of thumb is just that. If there is three numbers the flight is almost certainly maineline, of there are four, it is likely to be codeshare/franchise. Flight numbers in the 7XXX, 8XXX, 9XXX are especially likely to be codeshares.

Like all travel these days, you need to go into things with your eyes open.

Brian.



Next flights: MAN-ORK-LHR(EI)-MAN(BD); MAN-LHR(BD)-ORK (EI); DUB-ZRH-LAX (LX) LAX-YYZ (AC) YYZ-YHZ-LHR(AC)-DUB(BD)
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25170 posts, RR: 22
Reply 16, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 7 hours ago) and read 10527 times:



Quoting AA7295 (Reply 2):
Something that has always puzzled me, is why UA & SQ don't codeshare? Does anyone know?

As far as I know, SQ and UA have never had a very close relationship within Star Alliance and have had several disputes over various issues. For example, UA was unhappy when SQ started 5th freedom service AMS-ORD a few years ago (since eliminated). UA didn't think another Star member should be offering 5th freedom service to the major hub of another member. It may also be at least in part because SQ doesn't consider UA's service standards high enough and thus prefers not to confuse their passengers who may wind up on a UA flight bearing an SQ flight number, thinking that it's an actual SQ flight.

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 4):
Code-share enables carriers to charge through fares instead of point to point.

As has already been mentioned, you don't have to codeshare to do that. Almost every major airline will sell you a through fare to almost everywhere in the world involving many airlines without any codeshare relationship.

Quoting Grozzy (Reply 8):
Ive booked a trip to Europe and back from Sydney, flying QF BA and AF but all with QF flight numbers. Can someone give an explanation why Ive got two identical reservations with different reference numbers? When I enquired with QF bookings, they assured me this was normal with multiple carriers but I still couldnt make sense of it.

It may be because the three carriers use different reservations systems. e.g. If carrier A uses Amadeus but carrier B uses Sabre or Worldspan, when they sell a through fare involving both carriers, each system will have a record of the booking but since the systems are unrelated they will use different file references.

Quoting Tango-Bravo (Reply 12):
Besides being utterly deceptive, codeshare has become nothing less than a form of legalized collusion that has allowed airlines to re-write the definition/intent of anti-trust law to eliminate competition.

Codesharing doesn't require anititrust immunity, but at least in the case of codesharing involving US carriers does require US DOT approval. Dozens of carriers codeshare without ATI but without immunity they can't discuss or coordinate fares. That's why you often see totally different fares on a codeshare flight according to which carrier's code is booked.

Quoting Kiwiandrew (Reply 11):
Quoting Nighthawk (Reply 10):
How does this work out financially for the airlines?

it varies from airline to airline and sometimes even from route to route

There are many types of arrangements. Sometimes a carrier will commit to a block of seats and will have to pay the other carrier whether the seats are sold or not. In other cases they may just free-sell into the general inventory under some agreed revenue-sharing formula but with with no requirement to pay for unsold seats. In other cases, like almost all codeshare relationships with domestic US and Canadian regional partner carriers, the codeshare carrier gets a fixed fee for operating the flight regardless whether it's full or empty, and the mainline carrier sets the fares, does all the marketing, and keeps all the revenue.

Quoting Jetdeltamsy (Reply 4):
Don't get me started. Code-sharing is deceptive marketing at its best.

However, in some cases, without codesharing there would be no nonstop or direct service in certain international markets. Sometimes the requirement to codeshare with a carrier from the other country is a condition when the bilateral air services agreement is negotiated between the two countries, especially when the market is fairly small and there isn't enough room for both carriers to operate. In such cases codesharing benefits the consumer since there would otherwise be no direct service.


User currently offlineDesertAir From Mexico, joined Jan 2006, 1461 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 10502 times:

I have had some positive and some negative experiences with code shares. The negative one involved the KLM/NW Code share. I discovered on the trip back from Kenya that the AMS-Detroit-SFO portion was on Northwest. After positive experiences on KLM I was disappointed with the NW AMS-Detroit portion. An old DC-10 with unpleasant FA and horrible food. I learned to check my tickets carefully.

This coming summer I am flying from LAX to Guadalajara. On the AA website shows Mexicana flying nonstop for a more reasonable price than AA with a stop in DFW. The other summer I discovered that I could use less AS miles by flying on AA than by flying on AS to Cancun.

As a loyal WN flyer, their code share with ATA makes Hawaii and come international travel a possibility for Rapid Reward usage.


User currently offlineRivet42 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 818 posts, RR: 1
Reply 18, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 10439 times:



Quoting SkyguyB727 (Reply 8):
The whole concept of code sharing came about because of bias in airline reservation systems used by travel agents. Nonstop and direct flights would appear first; online connections would appear on the next screen. After going through every possible online connection, the computer would then show interline connections. Airlines did studies and found that most travel agents booked flights off the first or second screen of availability. By "code sharing," an interline connection would appear in the computer as an online connection. It would, thereby, appear on one of the first availability displays.

Well stated. I can't improve on that explanation.  checkmark 

Riv'



I travel, therefore I am.
User currently offlineEXAAUADL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 10415 times:



Quoting A330323X (Reply 13):
I believe that the Allegheny-Henson codeshare predates that by several decades, starting in 1967. While Henson operated as Allegheny Commuter, Allegheny did not own the airline, nor did they make route or pricing decisions

I think that was the first, though it wasnt called codesharing...I also think that copdesharing predated NW/KL and AA/CP...I have a 1985 OAG with the first extensive codesharing. Resort Air became TW* and Air Midwest was OZ*


User currently offlineCommavia From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 11559 posts, RR: 61
Reply 20, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 10401 times:



Quoting EXAAUADL (Reply 19):
I have a 1985 OAG with the first extensive codesharing. Resort Air became TW* and Air Midwest was OZ*

Well, if that's the case, then that far predates AA/QF, which if I'm not mistaken began codesharing in 1988.


User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4755 posts, RR: 26
Reply 21, posted (6 years 6 months 3 days ago) and read 10339 times:

WOW... I never expected so hits.

Anyway, thank you for all the replies. I have been living and breathing the airline business for so long and sometimes you hear something that is frequently mentioned since the beginning of time, but never really knows what it means. From all the replies so far, I guess the definition is still evolving and different parameters governing each code share.

I guess I ended up with more questions that answers! Hahahahaha....

Keep the replies coming anyway. It is very excellent corporate knowledge, as far as I am concerned.

Cheers
Ryan



Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
User currently offlineAither From South Korea, joined Oct 2004, 858 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (6 years 6 months 2 days 23 hours ago) and read 10327 times:

And Ryanair is not code sharing but more and more low costs do (even Southwest I think on some routes to Hawaii).

I wonder if there are codesharing between airlines of different alliances ?



Never trust the obvious
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 25170 posts, RR: 22
Reply 23, posted (6 years 6 months 2 days 22 hours ago) and read 10282 times:



Quoting Aither (Reply 22):
I wonder if there are codesharing between airlines of different alliances ?

AF and QF codeshare between CDG and SYD. AF flights CDG-SIN also have a QF flight number and connect with QF-operated flights SIN-SYD which also have an AF flight number, so you can book either AF or QF all the way Paris-Sydney.


User currently offlineSkyguyB727 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (6 years 6 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 10212 times:



Quoting Aither (Reply 22):
I wonder if there are codesharing between airlines of different alliances ?

NW (Skyteam) codeshares with MA (OneWorld) from AMS to BUD.


25 Post contains images JGPH1A : It does seem odd, considering AF, BA and QF are all hosted in Amadeus. However, because some of the QF flights were codeshares operated by AF and BA,
26 MilesDependent : I was told by a check-in agent when flying to JNB that QF sets aside rows on their SYD-JNB flights for the SA codeshare.
27 Post contains images Mashimaro1 : As well as Brisbane, Adelaide, Perth and Melbourne And don't forget the AF codeshares on selected HK-Australia routes!
28 Jetblueguy22 : Well considering they have just about every airline there is in their system I don't think they would leave you wondering which airline you're flying
29 SpencerII : The first code share was between Pan Am and Pacific Express, however Braniff had interchange flights with Alaska in the 60's & 70's. (interchange was
30 EXAAUADL : what year was that?
31 Goldorak : There are quite a lot. Here are a few example of AF code-shares at CDG with non-skyteam airlines : - CDG-VIE with OS - CDG-BUD with MA - CDG-HEL with
32 Finnaviation : Nowadays even Star Alliance and oneworld have codeshares.
33 SpencerII : The agreement between Pacific Express and Pan American World Airways was entered into in October of 1982. Within 3 months, Pacific Express flight num
34 Ryanair!!! : As if the present code share with US Air presents a higher standard? SQ has recently added Charlotte to their network via a code share on US from NYC
35 Ctbarnes : Interestingly enough, it goes back even further than that. What we now called codesharing was what was previously known as 'interchange' or 'through'
36 Carduelis : Doubtless JGPH1 will comment, but all BA bookings actually have two PNRs even on their own bookings! My understanding of the reason is that BA 'prefer
37 Timz : Interchange services usually?/always? used a thru aircraft-- a codeshare connection doesn't. Aside from both being examples of cooperation between tw
38 AirlineEcon : Some types of code sharing could be a collusive arrangement if both airlines serve those cities. But for others like the AA QF arrangement it could pr
39 JGPH1A : Actually it isn't BA's DCS any more - RTZ is owned by Amadeus, and run on behalf of BA from the data centre in Erding, Germany. The 2 PNR's are not t
40 Viscount724 : As a few others have already pointed out in this thread, airlines don't have to codeshare to publish through fares that are less than the sum of sect
41 AirlineEcon : I have a couple questions. 1) It seems that 2 airlines could acheive the same outcome by either signing a code share or a prorate agreement. In fact
42 Kiwiandrew : my impression formed during 7 years in the travel industry is that pro-rate agreements are far more numerous than codesharing agreements - although I
43 Dalavia : This is definitely not so in China. Almost all domestic flights have 4 digits, and almost none are codeshares.
44 Viscount724 : I agree. At some airlines the manual containing bilateral SPAs (special prorate agreements) is thicker than the APD (Airlines Proration Directory), t
45 BA747400 : Its funny, i recently booked four legs through US, and three through Delta...when i take those 7 flights, i will not step on ONE DL or US plane, but C
46 Jetdeltamsy : There are thousans of 4 digit mainline flight numbers that are't code share numbers. What are you talking about?
47 SpencerII : This agreement with Alleghany was not a code share. It was known as joint fares or add on fares, and the two airlines worked together with each other
48 JGPH1A : Properly speaking, that was a franchise arrangement. A codeshare is a commercial duplicate flight, where the same physical flight carries more than o
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