Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
5th March Not A Good Day In Airline History  
User currently offlineGDB From United Kingdom, joined May 2001, 13170 posts, RR: 77
Posted (6 years 4 months 4 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 4036 times:

Some years apart, not in any way linked, but this caught my eye;
http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/default.stm

I did not know about the Spanish accident (the CV-990 was it seems a tough bird), but the BOAC 707 one is rather more infamous, not least due to some survivors from another recent accident, were apparently on board.

7 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBa97 From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 4 months 4 weeks 19 hours ago) and read 3719 times:

I have a thick disaster book (it lists all types from year 1 to 1978) which has a very stunning picture. Stunning in that it makes you look over and over wondering "if they only knew". It is a picture of the crashed plane wreckage with the BOAC 707 taxiing close behind it.


there is economy class, business class, first class...then Concorde..pure class
User currently offlineLoneStarMike From United States of America, joined Jul 2000, 3811 posts, RR: 34
Reply 2, posted (6 years 4 months 4 weeks 1 hour ago) and read 3394 times:

More March 5 accidents/incidents:

March 5, 1963: Patsy Cline (30), Cowboy Copas, Hawkshaw Hawkins, and Cline's manager were killed when their Piper PA-24 Comanche plane crashed near Camden, Tennessee, in adverse weather conditions.

Link

March 5, 1967: Lake Central Airlines Flight 527, a Convair C340 crashed near Marseilles, OH killing all 38 aboard.

Link

March 5, 2000: Southwest Flight 1455 overruns the runway upon landing at BUR and comes to rest near a Chevron Station. No fatalities.

Link

LoneStarMike


User currently offlineAnsett767 From Australia, joined May 1999, 1021 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (6 years 4 months 4 weeks ago) and read 3285 times:



Quoting Ba97 (Reply 1):
I have a thick disaster book (it lists all types from year 1 to 1978) which has a very stunning picture. Stunning in that it makes you look over and over wondering "if they only knew". It is a picture of the crashed plane wreckage with the BOAC 707 taxiing close behind it.

Sorry I am a bit lost, which accidents are you referring to? thank you!


User currently offlinePanAm747 From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4242 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 22 hours ago) and read 3137 times:



Quote:
Sorry I am a bit lost, which accidents are you referring to? thank you!

http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19660305-1

On the night of March 4, 1966, a Canadian Pacific DC-8 from Hong Kong was attempting to land at Haneda, but the weather was below minimums. At some point, the pilots tried to land, but ended up striking the edge of the runway (at the water's edge) and destroying the plane.

The next morning, March 5, 1966, was completely different from the day before. Strong winds from Manchuria and Siberia, blowing east, crossed unobstructed over the Sea Of Japan, allowing Mount Fuji to be seen from Tokyo, quite some distance away.

While this created incredible visual conditions, the Japanese have a proverb - "when Fuji is visible, the Gods are angry", in reference to severe weather that happens in these conditions. It is similar to the dread southern Californians feel when we feel wind coming from the east - the dreaded Santa Ana winds and the horrific fires they bring are on the way.

The picture that is being referred to is also in MacArthur Job's "Air Disasters, Volume One". A truly awful sight showed the doomed BOAC 707 taxiing past the still-smoldering wreckage of the CPAir DC-8. Tragically ironic, as the 707 would suffer a similar fate in less than an hour.

Because of the incredible visual conditions, the Captain requested a slight course change to give passengers some close-up views of Mount Fuji. Unfortunately, the rolling "rotor waves" of wind, that blown virtually unobstructed for hundreds of miles now encountered the mountain - and in spilling over, created turbulence that, at the time, was not really understood.

The 707 was clubbed sideways like a baseball being hit out of the ballpark. The tail and all four engines broke off first, followed by the tip of the right wing, and finally the front fuselage. The mystery of what caused the plane to be destroyed was finally solved when the film in one of the passengers' cameras was developed - it was determined that, because part of it was completely normal, then two frames skipped, then two blurry cabin images were shown, investigators concluded that a single, violent act damaged the plane beyond hope of saving. Turning their attention to the weather that day, the wind conditions of Mount Fuji caused this accident.

A truly horrible accident, but one that taught the aviation industry not to fool with Mother Nature.



Pan Am:The World's Most Experienced Airline - P(oor) S(ailor's) A(irline): San Diego's Hometown Airline-Catch Our Smile!
User currently offlineBa97 From Canada, joined Apr 2004, 377 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 2956 times:

PanAm747
Thanks for the explanation- places I have read give "pedestrian" explanations. Haven flown by Mount Fuji, as recent as a few weeks ago when the ski was a clear blue, it has a magnetic attraction of beauty in its symmetry and how it stands alone.



there is economy class, business class, first class...then Concorde..pure class
User currently offlineAcidradio From United States of America, joined Mar 2001, 1874 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 2929 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
FORUM MODERATOR

More Mar 5 accidents:

I started my first job in the airline business. Ha!



Ich haben zwei Platzspielen und ein Microphone
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24906 posts, RR: 22
Reply 7, posted (6 years 4 months 3 weeks 6 days 18 hours ago) and read 2905 times:



Quoting PanAm747 (Reply 4):
The picture that is being referred to is also in MacArthur Job's "Air Disasters, Volume One". A truly awful sight showed the doomed BOAC 707 taxiing past the still-smoldering wreckage of the CPAir DC-8. Tragically ironic, as the 707 would suffer a similar fate in less than an hour.

That wasn't a good few weeks at HND. Just a month earlier, February 4, 1966, an All Nippon 727-100 crashed into Tokyo Bay approaching HND killing all 133 aboard. At the time it was the worst ever crash in Japan.


Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Big Day In Aviation History posted Fri Dec 17 2004 13:51:41 by Xpat
Biggest Loudmouth CEOs In Airline History posted Wed Jan 15 2003 15:59:24 by 727LOVER
Sunday Was DEN's 3rd Busiest Day In 7 Year History posted Tue Jul 9 2002 00:37:09 by BA
Another Sad Day In Avation History posted Tue May 7 2002 19:26:48 by Captjetblast
Not A Good Day For Cessna's posted Sun Jan 6 2002 05:19:28 by AirCanadaGuy
This Day In Aviation History... posted Tue Dec 18 2001 02:03:27 by FlightSimFreak
Looks Like A Good Day In MEL Today... posted Sat Dec 23 2000 21:51:22 by Zanadou
Why Pilot Uniforms Not In Airline Colours? posted Thu Sep 6 2007 02:48:05 by NG1Fan
"FlyI: Dumbest Airline In American History " posted Mon Nov 14 2005 19:21:59 by Xkorpyoh
Delicious Bugs In Airline Food...NOT! posted Wed Dec 10 2003 05:51:00 by Easyjet