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Board Fast: An Interesting Article  
User currently offlineWNBob From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 166 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 1 month 13 hours ago) and read 1998 times:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=88196545

Also found "boarding randomly is fater than traditional back to front..." - hey, he's the physicist.  Smile

6 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineAloha73G From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2334 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (6 years 1 month 13 hours ago) and read 1949 times:

Very interesting, makes sense. Perhaps a system like Southwest's with assigned seats would be best. It would be predetermined that (after Elites, etc) each seat would have a space in line (boarding #):

For a 73G:
24A, B, C=1, 2, 3
24D, E, F=4, 5, 6
22A, B, C=7, 8, 9

....etc. Even rows 1st, then odd. The board by # like Southwest (1-30, 31-60, 61-90, etc)

According to the physisicist it would work. Itd be interesting if an airline would be willing to try it.

You could even switch tit so that even rows go 1st on even numbered flights and odd rows go 1st on odd numbered flights.

-Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlineRedChili From Norway, joined Jul 2005, 2179 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 month 10 hours ago) and read 1829 times:

In theory, this may be the quickest way, but in reality, you would probably spend at least half an hour getting people organized and making people understand how to board the airplane.

Also, for his improved version of boarding windows seats first, then middle and then aisle, you would have a hard time convincing couples, families and other people traveling together that if you board separately, the airline will save a few seconds of time. All the arguments with all couples and families would probably take longer than the boarding itself.

Another problem is that in real life, many passengers are not present when the boarding call comes, some passengers are talking and don't get the details of the call, other passengers may have problems with understanding the language spoken by the staff, other passengers claim the right to board whenever they want due to business class or elite status, etc. etc.

I'd like to watch an airline boarding by this system, but I'd hate to be a passenger on the flight itself. This works in a lab but not in real life.

The physicist claims that, "The key is creating space in the aisle to allow passengers to stow away luggage in overheard bins." If the key is aisle space, why not fly on the A380, which has more aisle space per passenger than any other airplane?



Top 10 airplanes: B737, T154, B747, IL96, T134, IL62, A320, MD80, B757, DC10
User currently offlineStar_world From Ireland, joined Jun 2001, 1234 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 1 month 10 hours ago) and read 1817 times:



Quoting RedChili (Reply 2):
In theory, this may be the quickest way, but in reality, you would probably spend at least half an hour getting people organized and making people understand how to board the airplane.

The way to achieve this is to separate the resulting pattern from the instructions you give you pax - you just arrange it into groups, as they do now. You make some compromises in grouping the optimum ones together but overall it should still deliver a result.


User currently offlineLAXPAX From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 80 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 1 month 8 hours ago) and read 1714 times:



Quoting RedChili (Reply 2):
Also, for his improved version of boarding windows seats first, then middle and then aisle, you would have a hard time convincing couples, families and other people traveling together that if you board separately, the airline will save a few seconds of time.

But as the physicist said in the interview, although allowing for exceptions within his system (such as families) would detract from his "best case" time, it would still be faster than any system currently in use.

As the topic creator pointed out, the study showed that even random boarding was faster than any current system. Even the interviewer was surprised enough to ask the physicist to repeat that finding.



"Remember, no matter where you go... there you are." -- Buckaroo Banzai
User currently offlineBrianDromey From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 3901 posts, RR: 9
Reply 5, posted (6 years 1 month 8 hours ago) and read 1681 times:

IMHO the 3 easiest way to speed up boarding times:

1) Use forward and rear doors (or board by row numbers if this is not possible) - unassigned seating and a jetbridge is not a good idea, people will just clog up the isle at the front.
2) Limit carry ons to one piece per passenger.
3) Request that passengers step in from the isle while stowing luggage in overhead compartments.

None of these are all that difficult to do, I don't honestly believe that free seating speeds things up but it does increase the stress and commotion of boarding, especially if there are a lot of large groups traveling who want to sit together, or families.

Brian.



Next flights: MAN-ORK-LHR(EI)-MAN(BD); MAN-LHR(BD)-ORK (EI); DUB-ZRH-LAX (LX) LAX-YYZ (AC) YYZ-YHZ-LHR(AC)-DUB(BD)
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21413 posts, RR: 60
Reply 6, posted (6 years 1 month 7 hours ago) and read 1646 times:

As many airlines have switched to "Zone" or "Group" numbers/letters for boarding, it would be quite simple to board in this fashion on a 2-class plane:

Zone/Group 1/A: First Class and wheel chairs
Zone/Group 2/B: Elites and families with small children.
Zone/Group 3/C: rows 14,17, 20, etc.
Zone/Group 4/D: rows 15,18, 21, etc.
Zone/Group 5/E: rows 16,19, 22, etc.
Zone/Group 6/F: rows 5-12 (Y)

The reason the last group is just lumped together is that by this time, a lot of those seats are going to be full of elites and disabled, etc. so you are really just looking at filling 1/2 of those seats. Further, most of the overhead space may already be taken, so you'll have to hunt for room all over the plane anyway. There's no way it would be faster to split up, especially because many planes with F sections don't always have Y rows 5, 6 or even higher. Many start at 10.

The computer sorts out what zone to print on what ticket, and those traveling together will go in the highest group since they are likely to put their bags together anyway.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
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