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Flight School Help  
User currently offlineBA787 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 2596 posts, RR: 7
Posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 9 hours ago) and read 3222 times:

About a year and hal ago I posted a thread asking for advice after I had been informed that my eyesight was too poor to become a commercial pilot.

The thread is here ( I cringe slightly at some of my spelling mistakes)

My Pilot Dreams Shattered In The UK (by BA787 Dec 2 2006 in Civil Aviation)

My problem was that my eyesight was too poor to qualify for a Class One Medical here in the United Kingdom, which I'm sure you know is vital to become a Commercial Pilot over here.

Well in December 2006, the rules changed for a Class One Medical regarding vision, the prescription limit is now -6.00 dioptrees as opposed to -5.00 in 2005. This means that as it stands, I am currently -0.25 dioptrees over the limits required to obtain the medical. So with this in mind I sent an e-mail to the CAA last year asking their advice. They were incredibly helpful, I received a written letter in reply around a week later. They said that they would need to see a copy of my prescription so I sent one. I received another swift reply saying that although I was in excess of the guidelines, they would be willing to consider me for the Class 1 Medical. They did stress that this was only in theory and that I would have to be seen by one of their opticians. I am sixteen now and am not planning on thinking about beginning training until I am eighteen

So I began to consider my options based on this; I decided that I should continue to aspire to become a pilot but at the same time consider other job options in case my eyes worsened.

Then a few months ago, I returned to my opticians for my yearly check and was informed that my vision had improved slightly and my prescription was changed accordingly.

Anyway, now that I have decided to see what happens as far as my vision is concerned and continue to consider other options, I would like some advice on the sort of thing flight schools are looking for in candidates. I have brochures from OAT and Cabair and have researched all the main schools. I have visited the websites for FT Europe as well as a few others.

As far as I can see, the other hurdle that I need to jump is the cost. The prices for fully integrated courses that enable me to start working for an airline on completion of the course (following familiarisation training, hours etc.) range from about £50,000 to £80,000. This is an amazing amount of money and I will undoubtedly need to take out a huge loan and receive financial help from my parents. This will leave me in a lot of debt once I have completed the course, meaning a job at the end is vital.

From what I can see, one of the only ways to even nearly guarantee a job at the end is through a self sponsorship course or part sponsorship course. I'm talking about courses like the Thomas Cook Self Sponsorship course where you pay the full cost of training yourself and then the airline will pay for your type training and give you a job working for them at a slightly lower salary. I might be wrong on my understanding of this, so any insight that is additional to the things from the websites would be helpful.

Based on this, I think I will complete my A levels (which i picked last week) and then try to apply to OAT and Cabair and see whether they offer me a place on a course and hopefully see if I am offered a position on one of the airline courses. My main question is what are the chances of me being accepted if I have this sort of a qualification portfolio( Grades are achieved unless stated):

English Language GCSE: A*
English Literature GCSE: Predicted A*
Science Double Award GCSE: A (predicted an A for this years GCSE)
Maths GCSE: Predicted A*
French GCSE: Predicted A
ICT Certificate in Digital Applications(2 GCSE): A* (Predicted A* for this year, last years could change depending on this years grade)
Humanities GCSE: Predicted A*
Food Technology GCSE: Predicted A
Geography GCSE: B
Y.M.C.A. Assistant Fitness Instructor Level 1 : Passed

The predicted grades are high due to my SATs scores, I doubt I will achieve the full extent of these

I have chosen my A levels as:

Maths
Physics
Chemistry
Biology

These will enable me to either follow my dream of being a pilot or become a doctor which is my other theory.

So, what chances do I have of being accepted onto these courses if I pass these qualifications. Also, what are the standards of other people that go into the profession.

Any advice given will be greatly received.

Sorry about the length of this as well, looking back on it I got a bit carried away with my words Big grin

Thanks BA787

23 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3211 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting BA787 (Thread starter):
As far as I can see, the other hurdle that I need to jump is the cost.

If your eyesight is good enough to qualify to fly commercially, might military aviation be an option?

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineMhodgson From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2002, 5047 posts, RR: 26
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 3201 times:

The sponsorships run by Oxford require separate applications - IIRC if you fail the sponsorship assessments, but pass the OAT specific sections, you may still be offered a position on the course if you retake the remaining assessment items. You don't do the Oxford assessment and then get selected for the sponsorships, unfortunately.

Your GCSE grades look fine to me, and based on those I doubt your A-levels will pose a problem.

I recently completed Oxford; after gaining mainly Bs at GCSE and A, B, B, D at A2. I got 89% average in all ground school exams, and attained first time passes in all flying tests except the Instrument Rating, in which I received a first series pass. I am now in the process of applying to airlines.



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User currently offlineAcey559 From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 1522 posts, RR: 2
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3151 times:

Just a thought, but would coming to the United States be out of the question? Generally, it costs less to get your license here because we don't have user-fees and overall the cost of flying is less, from what I've heard. Also, with the weak dollar as compared to Pound Sterling, it might be advantageous to come over here. There are many options including flight academies like Delta Connection Academy or Pan Am Academy, or you can pay a little more and go to a four year college and get a degree in aviation, or anything else for that matter, and you can still fly. I go to a four year university and a flight operations and business major, but I'm still doing all of my flying. I'm finishing up my sophomore year and am just starting my multi-engine rating, and graduating early isn't out of the question. I know it might be hard to do, but we have a few international students now, so maybe you might looking at coming over to our side of the Pond?

User currently offlineDehavalandb From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 67 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 3141 times:

You might want to look into LASIK surgery. I'm not sure if that would disqualify you from flying in the UK, but here in the USA you can still get your First Class medical. If you can bring your vision to 20/20 with glasses or surgery you can fly commercially. As for the cost of training, coming to the USA to fly is substantially cheaper. Oxford sends their students here for a reason.


"Common sense is not quite so common" Benjamin Franklin
User currently offlineSevenair From United Kingdom, joined Feb 2001, 1728 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 3116 times:

Do not get drawn in by marketing machines that convince you you need to part with up to £100,000 to be a pilot. Many people have went modular, and got airline jobs.

Be advised that HSBC have the monopoly on funding the Oxford scheme, and they will only loan up to £50k, and will require the deeds to your parents house.

THe moral of the story is - if you can't get the funding, or would rather not gamble your parents life's work, then there is the modular option.

See pprune, if you can sift through all the bitching, there is a good deal of info there.


User currently offlineBA787 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 2596 posts, RR: 7
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 3098 times:



Quoting 2H4 (Reply 1):

Over here the forces require 20/20 vision with no correction

Quoting Mhodgson (Reply 2):

Thanks for the insight, I'm sorry, I'd forgotten that you had been at Oxford, otherwise I would probably saved myself a lot of writing and PMd you. Hows the job hunting going?

Quoting Acey559 (Reply 3):

I would come over to the States but I would rather stay here in the UK, if possible. I will give that some thought, Thanks

Quoting Dehavalandb (Reply 4):

The limits are the same; if your vision was outside the limits prior to the surgery, you will fail the medical.

Quoting Sevenair (Reply 5):

I have a pprune membership, so I might have a look around. Thanks for the info on HSBC, I'll bare that in mind.

Thanks for all the replies guys, I appreciate the help.

BA787


User currently offline2H4 From United States of America, joined Oct 2004, 8955 posts, RR: 60
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 2 days 3 hours ago) and read 3089 times:
AIRLINERS.NET CREW
DATABASE EDITOR



Quoting BA787 (Reply 6):
Over here the forces require 20/20 vision with no correction

Right. You'll need to go ahead and purchase some bionic eyes, then:



The Boston Retinal Implant Project recently developed a bionic eye implant that will restore vision to those affected by degenerative blindness. The device works by being implanted into the back of the eyeball and working as a light transmitter to the brain, where the two are connected by a nerve/wire thinner than a human hair.

Full article here.

 Wink

2H4



Intentionally Left Blank
User currently offlineN353SK From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 811 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3019 times:

Another thing to consider is whether your eyesight will deteriorate further as you age. Has your glasses prescription stayed the same, or have you been needing stronger glasses every year or two? If you're considering flying as a career, you need to look ahead 40 years and be reasonably sure you'll still be able to get your medical. They may be willing to give you a medical now while your vision is close to the limits, but if your sight continues to deteriorate you may wind up out of luck. I hate to be a killjoy, but it's important to consider all of these things before you spend thousands of pounds on learning to fly. Either way, good luck chasing your dreams!

User currently offlineBoston92 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 3390 posts, RR: 7
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 3018 times:



Quoting N353SK (Reply 8):
Another thing to consider is whether your eyesight will deteriorate further as you age. Has your glasses prescription stayed the same

Let's take 5 minutes and actually read his original post.



"Why does a slight tax increase cost you $200 and a substantial tax cut save you 30 cents?"
User currently offlineMhodgson From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2002, 5047 posts, RR: 26
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 11 hours ago) and read 2971 times:



Quoting Sevenair (Reply 5):
Do not get drawn in by marketing machines that convince you you need to part with up to £100,000 to be a pilot. Many people have went modular, and got airline jobs.

How much? Even with all my living a costs for the course the money I have spent is well short of six figures.

Modular is worth looking into - I didn't do it as I felt the integrated route offered a little more security through the training continuity, plus I lacked a PPL, and the costs of gaining one were quite high due to the fact I had zero time and no real local airfields. Factoring in fuel and time for simply getting to the airport, plus the time it would have taken to attain the PPL in British weather, meant that it wouldn't have been a huge benefit to me personally.

Quoting Sevenair (Reply 5):
Be advised that HSBC have the monopoly on funding the Oxford scheme, and they will only loan up to £50k, and will require the deeds to your parents house.

Not necessarily - I know of at least two people on my course who have attained the full loan amount elsewhere. HSBC haven't got a monopoly as such, they just happen to have the link with Oxford and thus can keep in touch regarding employment statistics. Few banks will loan £50,000 without having some idea of the course; HSBC in Morecambe won't loan me the money on the basis that they have no knowledge of the course and so would struggle to verify my business plan; whereas the Oxford branch sees plenty of the plans and knows the likelihood of success. It is worth searching around.

Additionally, you do not have to put up the deeds of your house as security - as long as you have something which can be used as security it doesn't matter what it is. I took out the full £50,000 and it is not secured against my parent's home.

Quoting BA787 (Reply 6):
Hows the job hunting going?

Not fantastic - the mergers of Thomsonfly and First Choice, and MyTravel and Thomas Cook means that those 4 airlines who might take graduates are now 3 airlines who have downsized and so no longer require pilots for 2008.

FR, BA and BE are doing a lot of recruitment however, so I'm hopeful that I will get a job within the next few months.



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User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 2961 times:

You should take a look at: www.ctcwings.co.uk

I have wanted to become a commercial eversince i took my first commercial flight (age 6).... i have take 3 hours of flying lesson (just for fun)...... i have the same problem as many aspiring pilots... finding funding for itt....CTC wings are able to arrange a £50k UNSECURED loan for the Cadet's ATP scheme..... in a nut shell.... you need to put up £50k.... this goeas into a bond.... before you start the course, you are placed with an airline.....when you finish your training in UK & NZ you start your TR and then start employment....your £50k which you put up....is paid back to you piece by peice during your employment with the airline...that way the airline can gurantee your stay....this means the airline pays for your training in full.....

i must stress though......COMPETETION IS VERY STIFF....THERE POSSIBLY 100 PLACES PER YEAR AND OVER 4000 APPLICANTS.... I hope to pray to god that i get accepted in two years timee...


Im in the same situation as you... i am in year 11 and have GCSE in a couple of weeks.... and will take 4 A'levels too, in the next two years.



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlineBA787 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 2596 posts, RR: 7
Reply 12, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 2920 times:



Quoting Mhodgson (Reply 10):
Modular is worth looking into - I didn't do it as I felt the integrated route offered a little more security through the training continuity, plus I lacked a PPL, and the costs of gaining one were quite high due to the fact I had zero time and no real local airfields. Factoring in fuel and time for simply getting to the airport, plus the time it would have taken to attain the PPL in British weather, meant that it wouldn't have been a huge benefit to me personally

I'm in the same boat really, I'm starting out with no hours and just the qualifications I listed (providing I get them) and I think Integrated is probably best for me really

Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 11):

I had a good look at the CTC Wings idea, and I thought that it would be the ultimate trainign if I managed to be accepted. That said, Oxford, Cabair and FT Europe all have amazing reputations too, the only downside is that they offer courses that don't always have a job waiting at the end of them, whereas from what I can gather, CTC Wings course ensures a job. It's also slightly cheaper but I don't know the full details whereas I know OAT includes quite a lot in the price.

Thanks for all the help guys

Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 11):
Im in the same situation as you... i am in year 11 and have GCSE in a couple of weeks.... and will take 4 A'levels too, in the next two years

Might see you in a couple of years then.

BA787


User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2883 times:



Quoting BA787 (Reply 12):
Might see you in a couple of years then.

That would be great lol.....


But CTC does have very high standards.... but the downside is ... you will not get a Airline Transport Managment Degree from CTC, and to my knowlege only OAT offer this. By OAT offering the Degree within the course... you are eligible for goverment support aswell as student loans... this will also help with the final cost..


regards


p.s i added you to my respected member list  Smile



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19186 posts, RR: 52
Reply 14, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 2879 times:

Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 13):
Airline Transport Managment

I'll be doing Air Transport Management from this Sept. Will only be 26 when I start.  

I decided against becoming an airline pilot to concentrate on airline management. But I hope to acquire my PPL when I can and add IR, IMC, multi-engine, etc.

Best of luck BA. I'm sure you'll do well.  Smile

[Edited 2008-03-22 11:53:49]


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineRunway24R From United Kingdom, joined May 2007, 47 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 2840 times:



Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 13):



Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 13):
... you will not get a Airline Transport Managment Degree from CTC, and to my knowlege only OAT offer this. By OAT offering the Degree within the course... you are eligible for goverment support aswell as student loans... this will also help with the final cost..

Hi,

I am currently studying Air Transport with Commercial Pilot Training at Bucks New Uni (BCUC) in High Wycombe, West London.

They operate two courses:

The one I am on is a full bachelors degree and the training is provided by Cabair and Orlando Flight Training. This is a full three year course broken down as follows:

Year one: intro to air transport, PPL ground school, PPL
Year two: ATPL ground school, hour building (at OFT in Orlando), and CPL
Year three: dissertation and full uni studies. MCC, IR, etc are then completed after finishing your third year at uni.

The OAT course I believe is only a foundation degree. The plus side is that I think it is 14 months with OAT, 1 year at uni. If anyone know different, please correct me.

I am coming to the end of my second year on the course and am currently doing my hour building out in Orlando

some websites for you to help you are:

www.cabair.com
www.bucks.ac.uk
www.flyoft.com

Any further questions or advice, I'd be more than happy to help!!

Good luck guys in achieving your goals in aviation!

Regards, Runway 24R  wave 



A319, A320, A321, A332, A333, A346, 732, 733, 736, 738, 744, 752, 762, 763, 772, 77L, 77W, CRJ700, MD80
User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 2801 times:



Quoting Runway24R (Reply 15):
Any further questions or advice, I'd be more than happy to help!!

Hi,

How much is costing you for the full course ??? is the flight training funded by the uni ?? after you complete the three years with them, do you need to take further training to become a airline pilot (exc TR) ?

Ive done excessive research on nearly all the flying schools... but it never really looked into the uni option, as i kind of thought it was missing something.... basically thats what I'm asking you.... ?


what is it missing ??


regards



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlineRunway24R From United Kingdom, joined May 2007, 47 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2718 times:



Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 16):
How much is costing you for the full course ??? is the flight training funded by the uni ?? after you complete the three years with them, do you need to take further training to become a airline pilot (exc TR) ?

Ive done excessive research on nearly all the flying schools... but it never really looked into the uni option, as i kind of thought it was missing something.... basically thats what I'm asking you.... ?

The training is not funded in any way by the uni, however I believe the cost of training is offered at a cheaper rate by Cabair than if you were to do the modular course alone. I do not have any figures to back this up though. The final outcome from the course is a BA Hons in Air Transport with Commercial Pilot Training and a frozen ATPL. As with OAT, Cabair, etc we do not get a type rating as that is financed by ourselves or the airline employing us once we have obtained the fATPL. Unless you do a direct training scheme with an airline I do not know of any flight school where you get a type rating as part of the course. Again, please correct me if I'm wrong.

Cost wise, I believe the full training is in the region of £45,000 (Sept 2006 intake). Extra costs on top of that are: 3 years tuition fees totalling £4,600, 3 years accommodation at roughly £10,000, flights, visas, fingerprints for the 2 US phases (completion of PPL and hour building) equating to say, £1,000.

Therefore, the TOTAL cost (Sept '06 intake) is in the region of the £60,000 mark.

If you are serious about the course, when the time is right for you, I'd strongly advise you head down to Wycombe for one of their open days and the faculty will explain everything in much greater detail, and with more accurate prices. When I first heard about the course (by accident on the UCAS website) I was very confused as to what the course entailed, etc. The open day was extremely useful and was the best uni open day I went to. (I had also considered aero engineering too.) John Furley is the course leader, and I'm sure he'd be happy to answer any questions that I can't about the course.

The uni course in my opinion is great, and I couldn't praise Bucks enough for that. However, my experiences with Cabair leaves a lot to be desired unfortunately!! Hopefully things will have improved by the time you are looking at starting. My limited experience with OAT (open day and the interview for the course) left me very impressed with their facilities and set up. However, the degree on the OAT course is only a foundation as far as I know, and I would imagine the training costs to be a lot higher than Cabair. Plus side is the course is a little over two year, meaning you can be earning as a pilot a year earlier. That's my unbiased view of it.

Again, any further questions just let me know.

Regards, Runway 24R  wave 



A319, A320, A321, A332, A333, A346, 732, 733, 736, 738, 744, 752, 762, 763, 772, 77L, 77W, CRJ700, MD80
User currently offlineMir From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 21423 posts, RR: 56
Reply 18, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 7 hours ago) and read 2709 times:



Quoting Acey559 (Reply 3):
Generally, it costs less to get your license here because we don't have user-fees and overall the cost of flying is less, from what I've heard.

That's indeed correct. Plus, the FAA does not care how blind you may be - as long as it's corrected, you get the medical (with the restriction that you have to wear glasses or contacts, of course).

-Mir



7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
User currently offlineRoyalAirMaroc From United Kingdom, joined Mar 2007, 187 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 3 months 3 weeks 6 hours ago) and read 2680 times:



Quoting Runway24R (Reply 17):
If you are serious about the course, when the time is right for you, I'd strongly advise you head down to Wycombe for one of their open days and the faculty will explain everything in much greater detail, and with more accurate prices.

I will be going to the "FLYER Professional Flight Training Show" at heathrow Renaissance Hotel... i believe all the training schools will be there...

i would recomment anyone remotly interested becoming a pilot attend the seminar.... it only happens once a year.

http://www.flyer.co.uk/exhibitions/

Regards



Life is a Journey, One Which I hope will include alot of Flights !! =]
User currently offlineBA787 From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2006, 2596 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2560 times:



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 14):
Best of luck BA. I'm sure you'll do well

Thanks, I appreciate the insight. I've never really heard of the Air Transport Management degree being cimbined with training before but this would be ideal for me I think

Quoting RoyalAirMaroc (Reply 13):
But CTC does have very high standards.... but the downside is ... you will not get a Airline Transport Managment Degree from CTC, and to my knowlege only OAT offer this. By OAT offering the Degree within the course... you are eligible for goverment support aswell as student loans... this will also help with the final cost..

CTC would probably be a pipe dream, but it sounds good. I will have to think though, the plus side to haveing a degree in ATM is that if jobs as pilots are hard to come after the course and if I don't get a job guaranteed at the end of my course, I could become an ATM and wait for jobs to become available.

Thanks for all the help guys

BA787


User currently offlinePe@rson From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 19186 posts, RR: 52
Reply 21, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 2548 times:

One thing that would somewhat worry me if I were to become an airline pilot - which I'm not - would be what'd happen career-wise and life-wise if I were to fail my medical and thus be out of a job. What back-up would I have? Could I gain a decent back-up that could, perhaps, actually support my career as an airline pilot? What about a degree in, say, aeronautical engineering or air transport management? I believe these are questions you should perhaps also think about.

[Edited 2008-03-24 10:12:30]


"Everyone writing for the Telegraph knows that the way to grab eyeballs is with Ryanair and/or sex."
User currently offlineRunway24R From United Kingdom, joined May 2007, 47 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 3 hours ago) and read 2519 times:



Quoting BA787 (Reply 20):
CTC would probably be a pipe dream, but it sounds good. I will have to think though, the plus side to haveing a degree in ATM is that if jobs as pilots are hard to come after the course and if I don't get a job guaranteed at the end of my course, I could become an ATM and wait for jobs to become available.



Quoting Pe@rson (Reply 21):

That's exactly why I'm on the course. Nothing is guarenteed in the aviation world, so a degree in Air Transport will be a great back up. It also will make you a slightly better pilot by having an understanding of ground operations, ticketing, terminal design, etc. Also, it will look great on the CV.



A319, A320, A321, A332, A333, A346, 732, 733, 736, 738, 744, 752, 762, 763, 772, 77L, 77W, CRJ700, MD80
User currently offlineMhodgson From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2002, 5047 posts, RR: 26
Reply 23, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 2488 times:

BALPA offer a loss of medical insurance, which would obviously not cover you for life, but would assist in the short term with mortgages, outstanding loans.


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