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Singapore Airlines Airbus A380 Engine Changes  
User currently offlineSINGAPORE_AIR From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2000, 13738 posts, RR: 19
Posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 12112 times:

Note to PM: Don't shoot the question-poser  Wink




I notice on the following pictures that certain engines are a bit new. From what I've read on the forums over the years, if you look at the tip of the engine nozzle(?) and it's blue / bluey coloured (i.e.: not grey), then it's a new engine.


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Is this normal in aircraft operations to have a bunch of engine changes or not?

Singapore Airlines currently operates the largest fleet of Airbus A380 aircraft bringing Travel In A New Light


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11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineANstar From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2003, 5167 posts, RR: 6
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 12050 times:

I think that blue can still be seen for a month or so afterwards. I dont recall hearing about any A380 with SQ having an engine change - and im sure we would have

User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21474 posts, RR: 60
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 11980 times:



Quoting ANstar (Reply 1):
I think that blue can still be seen for a month or so afterwards. I dont recall hearing about any A380 with SQ having an engine change - and im sure we would have

His point was that on the same aircraft, one engine shouldn't be blue/purple and the others grey unless that engine was changed.

Did they change out an engine during the fuel pump problem?



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineZeke From Hong Kong, joined Dec 2006, 8866 posts, RR: 75
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 11820 times:

Maybe it is something similar to what we did on out 773ERs, swapped one of our spare engines onto the frames after running the aircraft for a while so the engines had different hours on it as a risk mitigation exercise in case a previous identified problem that only shows up aft x number of hours manifests itself.


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User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21474 posts, RR: 60
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 11774 times:



Quoting Zeke (Reply 3):
Maybe it is something similar to what we did on out 773ERs, swapped one of our spare engines onto the frames after running the aircraft for a while so the engines had different hours on it as a risk mitigation exercise in case a previous identified problem that only shows up aft x number of hours manifests itself.

I was wondering about that, or just about them doing it for training so their Mechs know how to do it quickly and can take apart a "used" engine to inspect it and know what to look for. SQ being the first customer means they are blazing trails here...



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlinePM From Germany, joined Feb 2005, 6868 posts, RR: 63
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 3 days 2 hours ago) and read 11470 times:



Quoting SINGAPORE_AIR (Thread starter):
Note to PM: Don't shoot the question-poser

Just so long as "SQ A380 engine changes" doesn't mean their defection to the Engine Alliance!  Smile

Quoting SINGAPORE_AIR (Thread starter):
Singapore Airlines currently operates the largest fleet of Airbus A380 aircraft

Er, "the largest"? What's wrong with "the only"?!  Wink


User currently offlineRamzi From Canada, joined Oct 2006, 535 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 14 hours ago) and read 9100 times:



Quoting PM (Reply 5):
Er, "the largest"? What's wrong with "the only"?!

"The largest" will last longer than "the only" but none will last too long anyway. Big grin



There will come a time when you believe everything is finished - that will be the beginning.
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 8372 times:



Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 2):
His point was that on the same aircraft, one engine shouldn't be blue/purple and the others grey unless that engine was changed.

The nozzle is a separate component...it's possible they just changed a nozzle due to ramp rash. That's no unheard of, although damaging the inlet is more common.

Tom.


User currently offlineGEnxPower From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 121 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 13 hours ago) and read 7796 times:

Just my 2 cents on the part names, as a engine designer...

There are really too many nozzles on an engine, so sometimes we got to be more specific with what we mean. We get what you mean, Singapore_Air, but I'm just trying to offer up what we call them here

It goes by any of the names like "Exhaust Nozzle", "Exhaust Cone", "Aft Center Body" or "Aft Cone". All describe to various detail the region/component you are talking about.

As for engines being swapped out with spares, it's pretty common, especially in new aircraft/new engine combinations.


User currently offlinePW100 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2002, 2368 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 12 hours ago) and read 6905 times:



Quoting Zeke (Reply 3):
Maybe it is something similar to what we did on out 773ERs, swapped one of our spare engines onto the frames after running the aircraft for a while so the engines had different hours on it as a risk mitigation exercise in case a previous identified problem that only shows up aft x number of hours manifests itself

I don't think that the risk described is the main factor. This practice is usually done to get a stagger in accumulated engine hours/cycles to prevent that all engines needs [heavy] maintenance at the same time.
As an independent MRO [Maintenance, Repair, Overhaul] company for regional airline engines, we actively recommend this practice, and include such a stagger plan in our PBTH [Power By The Hour] maintenance contracts.

Not sure if that is the case in this example, but it absolutely would make sense.

Regards,
PW100



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User currently offlineFruitbat From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 549 posts, RR: 6
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 8 hours ago) and read 4939 times:

AFAIK there have been no unplanned engine swaps on the in-service A380's thus far.

Remember that the engines in service will all have accumulated different lives due to their place in testing plans, etc.

Quoting PW100 (Reply 9):
This practice is usually done to get a stagger in accumulated engine hours/cycles to prevent that all engines needs [heavy] maintenance at the same time.

This sounds like what has happened here and is part of the detailed planning that takes place years in advance to ensure a successful entry into service.

Quoting PM (Reply 5):
Just so long as "SQ A380 engine changes" doesn't mean their defection to the Engine Alliance!

I nearly had a heart attack reading the thread title!  eyepopping   faint 



Weaseling out of things is important to learn. It's what separates us from the animals ... except the weasel.
User currently offlineKC135TopBoom From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 12128 posts, RR: 51
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 months 2 weeks 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 3960 times:



Quoting Zeke (Reply 3):
Maybe it is something similar to what we did on out 773ERs, swapped one of our spare engines onto the frames after running the aircraft for a while so the engines had different hours on it as a risk mitigation exercise in case a previous identified problem that only shows up aft x number of hours manifests itself.



Quoting GEnxPower (Reply 8):
As for engines being swapped out with spares, it's pretty common, especially in new aircraft/new engine combinations.

That is correct.

I have not read/heard of any enine FOD injestion or bird strike that required an unscheduled engine change of the A-380.


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