Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Bankruptcy: American Airlines The Next Eastern?  
User currently offlineAAJFKSJUBKLYN From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 901 posts, RR: 1
Posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17763 times:

I received this via email this morning and it has insights into some interesting thoughts, though I would throw it out there for comments:

The Interview is with an Investment Banker::::

Bob,on a 1 to 10 scale, how do you rate AMR's chances of not being
here in 2 years?
10 = gone for sure
01 = very slight chance of being gone
__________________________________________________________
_________________

8+

Steve, interesting that you asked that question. I just had 2
lengthy e-mail exchanges with individuals in a mid-life airline
employment crisis quandary Do I stay or do I go kind of thing. Being
52 or 53 can be a gut wrenching time in many ways.
The economic stars are aligning against AA. Fundamental AA/AMR
problems in order of severity:

1. Employee problems. All 3 contracts are due and the employees are
in an Eastern Airlines unforgiving mood. This was brought on by the
greed and incompetence of AMR Mgmt.
Almost no chance of another a Pull Together Win Together kind of
Kumbaya plan.

2. Price of Oil and Aviation Fuel will NOT come back to the level of
a few years ago.

3. Mandatory need for new fuel efficient aircraft. The MD-80s are a
fuel albatross that MUST be replaced and soon with 737-800s or 787s.
Difficult to do under current employee problems.

4. Open Skies and soon Open Cabotage. (Cabotage: Foreign Airline
operating a domestic route - Air France operating between Houston and
Chicago (Example).

5. Euro and continued weakening of the dollar. Making AMR a steal.

6. AMR stock price. Interesting to note that many misinformed
employees think that by driving down the stock price it hurts mgmt
and the infamous PUP bonuses. NOT TRUE. In fact it appears that
just the opposite is true in regards to the current VALUE of the
airline in regards to European carriers.

7. Congress is in no mood for any kind of bail out. 4 airlines have
failed in the last 2 weeks and it appears many more will be joining
them. The suicidal Delta rejection of the merge with NWA will be
revisited very soon as a strategy takes hold.

8. The parting out of UAL will accelerate the fracturing of the U.S.
airline industry driving carriers to look for safe harbors with the 3
mega European carriers. (UAL is already attempting to sell it's
maintenance division.)

9. Bush, McCain, Obama, and Clinton will not prop up or protect the
dying U.S. airline industry as they are all very Pro-NAFTA supporters
and globalists despite their public pronouncements.

All in all AMR as we know it is doomed. Regardless of how, AMR is
mostly NOT going to be around in 2 years in its present form. A
labor disruption will most likely exacerbate its demise. Mgmt has
doomed the company because of very shortsighted business practices.
Furthermore, employees are ignorant of what is really happening and
are further stressing the viability of the airline. As more airlines
fail, you notice how BK now have moved from the old breathing room
strategy to the more odious liquidation stage, the pressure will
surely mount on AMR to find a safe harbor BA is the logical buyer
as there is already strong ties between the 2 carriers. The key
questions, and one I cannot postulate on as it deals with intricate
financial structuring, is what shape will the buyout take? I do not
think it will be a merger per se, but some kind of amalgam between
out right buyout, which might be challenged under the current 25%/
proposed 49% foreign ownership rules, and subsidiary operation.
Virgin America was the test case and you know how that went. A
friend who knows the industry told me there are many ways around the
foreign ownership requirements as Branson has proven.

Ergo, to your question: 8+ AMR as we know it will not be here in 2
years. There are always caveats to everything, but under the current
situation that appears to be what probably will happen. As I told my
friend who is agonizing over all this, Where is Arpey? I'm sure there
is behind the scenes negotiations and the mgmt bastards will once
again walk away with millions while the employees are sold out as
cannon fodder. I hope I am wrong but I see NO way around this unless
there is a collapse of oil, collapse of the EURO, or another World
War.

I hear the fat lady tuning up along with Andrea Bocelli singing Time
to say Goodbye

So very sad but wasn't this all so predictable years ago? IMHO

67 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineNorthwestair From Poland, joined Jul 2001, 645 posts, RR: 5
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17762 times:

I don't see AA going anywhere. AA will weather the storm and be just like they always been.


I don't care who you fly just as long as you fly
User currently offlinePlobax From France, joined Jan 2008, 116 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17692 times:



Quoting Northwestair (Reply 1):
AA will weather the storm

This one looks like the Perfect Storm. Good luck AA !


User currently offlineCJAContinental From United Kingdom, joined May 2006, 459 posts, RR: 0
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17691 times:

Quoting AAJFKSJUBKLYN (Thread starter):

If AA is not going to be here in years, then exactly what will happen to it? Will it merge with another carrier, will it get bought out by another merged carrier? I doubt AA will go anywhere soon.

[Edited 2008-04-16 10:47:59]


Work Hard/Fly Right.
User currently offlineSPREE34 From United States of America, joined Jun 2004, 2240 posts, RR: 9
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17668 times:

I don't know, probably be smaller than they are now. The Eastern type employee sentiment is a bigger threat than I think Mgt or the stockholders realize.


I don't understand everything I don't know about this.
User currently offlineJfk777 From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 8273 posts, RR: 7
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17671 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

AA has tremendous international routes not easily duplicatable. LHR has 16 777 daily, no other USA airline can match that. NRT has, LAX, JFK & ORD, three of the biggest O&D cities. MSP, ATL and DTW might sound important to Delta/NW but are of little value to others, JAL flew to ATL it stopped years ago & BA recently stopped flying to Detroit after decades of service to Michigan.

JFK and Miami are tremendous international gateway cities, MIA still is the biggest gateway to Latin America. ATL is large too but the market has grown as well. AA will buy some assets from merging airline the DOT makes them sell, a route to China sounds good.


User currently onlineDLPMMM From United States of America, joined Apr 2005, 3589 posts, RR: 10
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17609 times:



Quoting AAJFKSJUBKLYN (Thread starter):
4. Open Skies and soon Open Cabotage. (Cabotage: Foreign Airline
operating a domestic route - Air France operating between Houston and
Chicago (Example).

This single answer makes me question this investment banker's credibility.

I don't see any way that the USA will allow for cabotage in the forseeable future. That this investment banker thinks it will happen soon makes me think he is full of it in other areas as well.


User currently offlineJaysan From India, joined Apr 2008, 99 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17593 times:

AA will be around for years to come! Even if they enter bankruptcy they will be around. They currently ended Q1 with 4.5 billion dollars on hand and are in good position to weather this storm.

User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21472 posts, RR: 60
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17579 times:



Quoting AAJFKSJUBKLYN (Thread starter):
4. Open Skies and soon Open Cabotage. (Cabotage: Foreign Airline
operating a domestic route - Air France operating between Houston and
Chicago (Example).



Quoting DLPMMM (Reply 6):
This single answer makes me question this investment banker's credibility.

Yep. Open Cabotage in 2 years? Please. Maybe in his dream world (if he is working on an AF or LH project right now...) but it's not going to happen. Ownership relaxation? Maybe, probably not with the 3 liberal people running for President. But Cabotage? Nope.

And 787s don't replace MD80s. Just to be clear.  Wink



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineLAXDESI From United States of America, joined May 2005, 5086 posts, RR: 48
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17559 times:

Financial news on AA. Looks like AA has a good hedge on fuel for second quarter.
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/stor...A2F2%2DD77E836E9D2E%7D&dist=hpmymw

Quotes:
AMR 9.09, +0.52, +6.1%) reported a loss of $328 million, or $1.32 a share, compared with a profit of $81 million or 30 cents a share in the first quarter a year ago. Revenue for AMR, which owns American and Eagle airlines, rose to $5.7 billion in the quarter from $5.43 billion a year ago.

Fuel Hedges
AMR said the cost of jet fuel increased by $665 million in the first quarter compared with the year-ago period, with the operator paying $2.74 a gallon in the quarter, up 48% from $1.85 a gallon last year. For the second quarter, AMR announced that it has hedged fuel costs to average about $3.01 a gallon. In the past week, jet fuel was prices at about $3.44 a gallon, up 69% from a year ago, according to the International Air Transportation Association.

Fleet Reduction/Replacement
Arpey also said that AMR will make additional reductions to its 2008 capacity plan and is accelerating the replacement of its MD-80 fleet with more efficient Boeing 737-800s. AMR expects to take delivery of 34 Boeing 737-800 aircraft in 2009 and 36 Boeing 737s in 2010. Of these, the company has firm commitments in place for 27 Boeing 737s to be delivered in 2009 and three 737s to be delivered in 2010.

Cash Position
AMR said it ended the first quarter with $4.9 billion in cash and short-term investments, including a restricted balance of $426 million, a 16.9% decrease from $5.9 billion in year-ago period.

Load Factor/Yields
During the recent quarter, AMR also said that it flew more people at higher airfare prices, and reduced its mainline capacity by a.5%. The carrier said its load factor hit a record of 79.1%, up a point form last year, while revenue per seat mile grew 6.5%.

Shares of AMR rose 7% to $9.18 at last check.


User currently offlineIsitsafenow From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4984 posts, RR: 24
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 17556 times:

Being on old debater, I could agree(discuss) this either way.
One side ....AA has deep pockets and good management.
the other.....In 1986 Eastern carried more pax in the free world then any other carrier...in 1991, you know what happened..

Heck when I was a kid I never thought Pan AM or TWA would go away but they did.
So you never can predict, no matter who or how smart you think you are, in the airline biz.
safe  old 



If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
User currently offlineAAJFKSJUBKLYN From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 901 posts, RR: 1
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17509 times:

Business wise it's an interesting topic starter, the original post are not MY VIEWS!. IMO, The labor factor is going to crush them a little, but all in all, I think they will come through. I think the next year will prove very interesting for AA and AMR, they agreed to sell off their Investment branch as well today.

Who knows! Time will tell.


User currently offlineMovingtin From United States of America, joined Oct 2006, 183 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17499 times:

I bet this gomer has shorted on AA stock! So, The largest airline in the world, with one of the most extensive route systems in the world, over 5 Billion in cash on hand, and a large unencumbered fleet, is going to just-POOF, disappear in 2 years!!
Lots of credibility there, Let me guess? at the end of this e-mail is he selling securities?


User currently offlineBigGSFO From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 2910 posts, RR: 6
Reply 13, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17412 times:

AA will be around. I can see them filing bankruptcy and negating union contracts before liquidating or breaking apart (with the exception of selling their Eagle assets). They will survive, but I reckon they will continue to reduce domestic flying. I wouldn't be surprised if STL is reduced to a spoke city only, with a few flights to LAX, NYC and DC.

User currently offlineAAJFKSJUBKLYN From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 901 posts, RR: 1
Reply 14, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17253 times:



Quoting Movingtin (Reply 12):
I bet this gomer has shorted on AA stock! So, The largest airline in the world, with one of the most extensive route systems in the world, over 5 Billion in cash on hand, and a large unencumbered fleet, is going to just-POOF, disappear in 2 years!!
Lots of credibility there, Let me guess? at the end of this e-mail is he selling securities?

Not attacking, all I am saying is it has HAPPENED before....EASTERN, PAN AM.


User currently offlineAAJFKSJUBKLYN From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 901 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17233 times:

As a side note, I hope It never does happen, as I use AA all the time, and my partner works for them. They are part of our life and family.

User currently offlineFLY2LIM From United States of America, joined May 2004, 1184 posts, RR: 10
Reply 16, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17166 times:



Quoting AAJFKSJUBKLYN (Thread starter):
1. Employee problems. All 3 contracts are due and the employees are
in an Eastern Airlines unforgiving mood. This was brought on by the
greed and incompetence of AMR Mgmt.
Almost no chance of another a Pull Together Win Together kind of
Kumbaya plan.

I have no economic background, no experience in labor relations, and have not ever worked for an airline. But even someone like me can figure out that none of the 3 unions can get too tough, given the current economic climates. They truly are lucky to have their jobs and any disruption of that would cause them to lose their jobs. Ironically, doesn't it actually FAVOR management to have the 3 unions up for negotiations at the same time? What I mean is, I don't think any one union can demand too much from management because it would cause the other two to want the same, so the negotiations are going to have to be very cautious and they will have to monitor each other's progress. Where management will benefit is that they could claim that "they cannot give too much away" because of pending negotiations with the other unions, thus creating a sort of safety net for management.
Again, I have no background on this. Correct me if I'm wrong.
I believe that the "expert" whose information started this discussion has a stake in all this and is, therefore, biased and nonobjective.

FLY2LIM



Faucett. La primera linea aerea del Peru.
User currently offlineLAXdude1023 From India, joined Sep 2006, 7493 posts, RR: 24
Reply 17, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17145 times:

What the hell is this dude smoking!!!???

Saying that AA isnt going to be around in two years? Really? You know things are tough right now, but AA will be fine in the long run. They might have to do some reductions, they might have to slow growth, they might even have to file for BK (this I doubt), but they are going to be ok.



Stewed...Lewd...Crude...Irreverent...Belligerent
User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21472 posts, RR: 60
Reply 18, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17086 times:

Remember, he's not saying they will be in BK. He's saying they will be GONE. That's why he's a gomer...  Wink


Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineKen777 From United States of America, joined Mar 2004, 8184 posts, RR: 8
Reply 19, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17086 times:

If push comes to shove with the unions the workers will basically have to decide on keeping their pension or having it changed in Ch 11. That to me is the basic issue at the point where AA has to decide to file or not.

Unfortunately for the unions there is no misunderstanding as to the price of fuel, or the deteriorating economic conditions in the US. They know what is going on and they know Ch 11 is a real possibility if they push too hard.

Personally I believe they may well push too hard this time and we'll either see a strike, or direct action by the management.

It's rather sad as I loved flying AA and have had friends who work there, or who have had parents working there going back 50 years.


User currently offlineFriendlySkies From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 4105 posts, RR: 5
Reply 20, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17028 times:

AA will still be around, but I'd give it a 70/30 chance they're in Chap 11 by the end of this year.

User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21472 posts, RR: 60
Reply 21, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 17028 times:



Quoting Ken777 (Reply 19):
Unfortunately for the unions there is no misunderstanding as to the price of fuel, or the deteriorating economic conditions in the US. They know what is going on and they know Ch 11 is a real possibility if they push too hard.

Didn't stop the pilots from picketing outside LAX yesterday re: the "safety and benefit of the passengers" to help gin up support for themselves. They know that the pilot group is the highest paid and least interacted with when it comes to the flyer, and wanted to paint themselves as the 'good guys' early, so we don't feel bad paying more in tickets to raise their salary, on top of fuel costs, while the other groups don't get raises...



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineComorin From United States of America, joined May 2005, 4895 posts, RR: 16
Reply 22, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 16985 times:

Looking at AA's Balance Sheet and P&L, I just don't see BK anywhere. What I do see is a low market cap of $2.3B, (CAL also about the same) which implies weak future cash flows.

IF AA is going BK after 2 years because of oil prices, then other US airlines will also be facing the same issue. I guess this is the ides behind consolidation - circling the wagons to not be the next BK victim.

Oil prices also reflect a cheap dollar, which makes services (flying) based on imported commodities (fuel) very expensive. Hopefully things will change.

Breathe easy, AA people.


(BK = Bankruptcy)


User currently offlineRoseFlyer From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 9488 posts, RR: 52
Reply 23, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 16896 times:

I think AA is ripe for a takeover from a non airline based team. The reason why I say this is that

Market Cap: 2.2 Billion
Enterprise Value: 8.7 Billion

That means that the company is worth more than it would cost to acquire. A ruthless company could takeover AA and profit from possibly breaking up or changing around the company.

For comparison's sake, here are the market cap and enterprise values of some other aviation companies:

Delta
Market Cap: 2.6
Enterprise Value: 9.2

Continental
Market Cap: 2.1
Enterprise Value: 4.2

Southwest
Market Cap: 9.2
Enterprise Value: 8.4

Boeing (just for fun)
Market Cap: 58.6
Enterprise value: 56.8

A financially sound company without risk for takeover or mergers would have the values about even.

Quoting AAJFKSJUBKLYN (Thread starter):

3. Mandatory need for new fuel efficient aircraft. The MD-80s are a
fuel albatross that MUST be replaced and soon with 737-800s or 787s.
Difficult to do under current employee problems.

It will be 2014 before any sizeable number of 737s or 787s could be made available. Unless they want 767s or 747s, Boeing can't really help much.



If you have never designed an airplane part before, let the real designers do the work!
User currently offlineFleet Service From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 622 posts, RR: 2
Reply 24, posted (6 years 3 months 1 week 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 16852 times:

"Steve" as in Steven Baumert of 'The Baumert Report' ?

Yeah, that's a credible source alright.  rotfl 

For those of you who aren't familiar with Mister Baumert, he is an AA flight attendant who fancies himself an investment banker/aviation analyst.The vast majority of his "Analysis" consist of nothing more than semi hysterical rants against AMR management.

I'd take anything Baumert says with a grain of salt the size of a Rubik's Cube.



Yes, I actually *do* work for an airline,how about you?
25 Cygnuschicago : Kind of funny to hear an investment banker calling management "bastards" that rake in "millions" while selling out employees. This is the JOB DESCRIP
26 Post contains links OPNLguy : If folks will look at http://aviation.beloblog.com/ and scroll down to the item at 12:35pm on 4-16-2008, they have some comments from analyst Jamie Ba
27 LMP737 : From who did you recieve this and who exactly is this investment banker?
28 Comorin : Hi there - sounds like you've pursuing an MBA? - good post!
29 EXAAUADL : exactly, he's full of crap...two years??? TW went nearly 13 years without making a profit 1988-2001. PA went 11 years with no profit 1980-1991. Will
30 ORDagent : I was taking my daily walk through downtown Chicago yesterday and many pilots from AA were PICKETING. It was an informational picket about how disgust
31 Ckfred : As angry as the employees are, they understand 2 things. First, they still have their pensions, while many pilots have lost theirs, and AA is still fu
32 Spacecadet : Sounds like famous last words to me. Pretty much every major shutdown and merger has been unexpected. Eastern, Braniff, TWA, Pan Am... even the ones
33 AirNZ : You could very well be correct. However, the banker also is because, irrespective of what on here are in complete denial about, you must remember tha
34 RoseFlyer : Nope, not working on my MBA, but I am one of the few engineers out here with a degree also in economics. I'm working on my Masters in Aeronautics now
35 RFields5421 : I thought the same thing when AAL's market cap was only 25% of what it is today. There is one very big - currently unsolvable - hurdle to a takeoff o
36 ADXMatt : I hope you're right. However cabotage is on the agenda for the next phase of open skies. So maybe not in 2 years but likely in less then 5. This will
37 FURUREFA : I'm going to preface this post by saying that I understand the F/As, rampers, pilots but also see things from management's perspective. The reason tha
38 LAXDESI : EV(Enterprise Value) by definition is greater than or equal to market cap as EV = Market Cap + Net Liabilities, where Net Liabilities = All Debt - Ca
39 Gsosbee : IF AA and its employees somehow work something out, AA will be a player when the next great consolidation comes around (i.e. when the foreign ownershi
40 ADXMatt : Pilots, Dispatchers, Mechanics are in demand too. Right now we lost 6 dispatchers who were experienced and educated to the oil company pipelines. Oth
41 ZiggyStardust : Not true. Toyota has an EV 110 Billion more than MV. EV measures how much it costs to acquire a company, since the acquirer also retains the liabilit
42 BrianDromey : True. Im sure BA are fairly frustrated by this. In a lot of ways BA/AA would make a lot of sense. Now, this banker claims AMR will not be around in t
43 B707forever : This is an excellent post. A very close friend with AA over 35 years is in a near state of panic. He truly believes the end is coming. At first I trie
44 JAL : A bit premature in my opinion predicting the death of AA!
45 WESTERN737800 : I dont see AA going anywhere anytime soon. Sure they have some issues to work out in the near future. If they somehow do fold, I'd like to see DL rehu
46 Lufthansa411 : In the end, it does not matter how many international gateways fly to, the only thing that matters in the long run is the bottom line. You can fly all
47 Ckfred : Of course, the one thing that could make every airline profitable is for the price of oil to drop dramatically. There are analysts who believe that th
48 DeltaL1011man : how do you replace MD-80s with 787s? DL/NW will have LAX and most likely JFK. Also what does BA stopping DTW-LHR have anything to do with DTW-NRT? wi
49 JFKPurser : Baumbert is not exactly an "Investment Banker". He is an AA FA who has like 10 people he manages a few dollars for on his days off. He made an ill-fat
50 Ikramerica : Then tell him/her to tell his/her workmates to STOP DEMANDING RAISES when the airline is about to sink. It's kind of like the captain on the titanic
51 Sparky35805 : AA doesnt have folks like Charlie Bryan and Frank Lorenzo. Sparky HSV
52 Joemugg : Maybe this is also a wake up call for AA to truly commit to customer service, inflight and on the ground. Some changes do not require money, but a bel
53 Jetdeltamsy : I agree. I think AA is in a position to weather the problems mentioned by the OP. I do agree strongly that management has got to stop enriching thems
54 JohnClipper : Exactly...my understanding is the the EU gave the US LHR in return for cabotage in the US down the road and a lifting/increasing of the 25% cap on fo
55 Baw716 : I want to make two very quick points about what has been said here: DLPMMM has it right. The investment banker is clueless when it comes to the airlin
56 CrAAzy : It's not just BA ... don't forget the other major partners around world (CX,QF, and even LA) that benefit greatly from AA's feed to some of their mos
57 BAW716 : Agreed...it's just 0139 and I'm getting a little tired. Thanks for reminding me that the other players in OneWorld are just as invested in AAs succes
58 JohnClipper : Section 21 of the Open Skies Agreement gives the EU the provision to suspend open skies and LHR access if discussions don't commence. From the actual
59 Goomba : Good riddance AA... I'm all for some new blood in the US waters. Perhaps this will drive a more customer and comfort centric approach to air travel ag
60 Spacecadet : Gasoline consumption in the US is *up* 0.8% over last year, even with prices that are about 40% higher. China's economic growth has been going at clo
61 Jfk777 : BA stopping service to Detroit after many decades demonstrates how the city has declined & NW can only support the double daily 744's from DTW to NRT
62 Flybyguy : Personally I agree with the guy on several points. The only thing that will ultimately take down AA is AA itself. Poor, shortsighted management under
63 JFKPurser : There will be no more strikes on AA property. No matter what rhetoric is spewed by any of the unions, they know deep down that there is no collective
64 Hondah35 : Are you sure this was from an "investment banker"? The painstaking recitation of possible scenarios and endless speculation points to this being writ
65 VC10DC10 : Hopefully they will take a page out of Northwest's book and put the fear of G*d into their unionized employees if and when a strike occurs. Striking
66 LAXDESI : [ I don't understand why anyone is for foreign ownership restrictions on US airlines. There are plenty of industries, including oil, where foreign own
67 VC10DC10 : That doesn't mean it's a good idea. Hypothetical scenario: What if Nazi Germany's super-profitable oil company "Nazolco" decided to buy up struggling
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
American Airlines The Largest In The World? posted Mon Jan 8 2001 22:54:37 by Delta777-XXX
American Airlines The Largest In The World? posted Mon Jan 8 2001 22:54:37 by Delta777-XXX
Why Can't AirTran Be The Next Eastern? posted Sat Oct 7 2000 03:29:12 by Exusair
Why Can't AirTran Be The Next Eastern? posted Sat Oct 7 2000 03:29:12 by Exusair
What Was The American Airlines "400"? posted Sat Dec 1 2007 10:34:48 by N702ML
What Was The American Airlines "400"? posted Sat Dec 1 2007 10:34:48 by N702ML
American Airlines 737-200s In The Mid 70's? posted Wed Apr 11 2007 00:25:02 by Flyinround731
American Airlines 737-200s In The Mid 70's? posted Wed Apr 11 2007 00:25:02 by Flyinround731
A Week Inside The Life - American Airlines posted Sun Feb 4 2007 17:43:24 by American757
A Week Inside The Life - American Airlines posted Sun Feb 4 2007 17:43:24 by American757
Cnbc American Airlines: A Week In The Life Of posted Mon Jan 1 2007 15:03:04 by Pilotdude09
Cnbc American Airlines: A Week In The Life Of posted Mon Jan 1 2007 15:03:04 by Pilotdude09
American Airlines Stuck In The Snow At DEN posted Wed Dec 20 2006 21:48:33 by Graphic
American Airlines Stuck In The Snow At DEN posted Wed Dec 20 2006 21:48:33 by Graphic
CNBC: American Airlines: A Week In The Life posted Wed Oct 4 2006 16:27:39 by Sunnyb
CNBC: American Airlines: A Week In The Life posted Wed Oct 4 2006 16:27:39 by Sunnyb
AA: The Future Of American Airlines posted Sun Oct 1 2006 19:52:50 by CHIFLYGUY
AA: The Future Of American Airlines posted Sun Oct 1 2006 19:52:50 by CHIFLYGUY
American Airlines Fleet Developments Next 10 Years posted Mon Jan 30 2006 22:07:54 by Keesje
American Airlines Fleet Developments Next 10 Years posted Mon Jan 30 2006 22:07:54 by Keesje
AA: The Future Of American Airlines posted Sun Oct 1 2006 19:52:50 by CHIFLYGUY
American Airlines Fleet Developments Next 10 Years posted Mon Jan 30 2006 22:07:54 by Keesje