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How's Air Canada Doing In Current Market  
User currently offline744 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 447 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 2 days 7 hours ago) and read 6960 times:

Dear All,
Due to rising fuel costs, airliners merger etc etc. How does AC stand in today's market? I've heard that whatever profit they made last year was already spent in rising fuel cost this year. Plus they have new aircrafts coming in. How does or will Air Canada plan to go through this period of recession. Last time I flew AC was on a 77W from YYZ - LHR. The plane was not even half full. Why would they have such a big aircraft if their loads are not too heavy. Even on the way back from LHR - YYZ on a 76XM the plane was only about 60% full. Why doesn't AC start different routes like it did in the 80's such as YYZ - LHR - BOM - SIN, YYZ - LAX - SYD? Does anyone know what AC's planning to do inorder to survive high fuel costs and competitions? Also on both of my flights the Inflight Entertainment Systems broke down half was during the flight, are there any updates of them installing more Thales circuit breakers that seems to break down most of the times?
All info is knidly appreciated,
Many thanks!
744

34 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineRyanair!!! From Australia, joined Mar 2002, 4738 posts, RR: 26
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 6902 times:



Quoting 744 (Thread starter):
Why doesn't AC start different routes like it did in the 80's such as YYZ - LHR - BOM - SIN,

I can speak from SIN's point of view. The present bilateral agreement between Canada and Singapore is icy, at best. AC wasn't happy with SQ's ops into YYZ in the early 90s because the latter's strong branding began to affect AC's trans-Atlantic market. Lo and behold, SQ was yanked from YYZ and YVR today remains a measely 3 times weekly. The demand is there, but SQ is not allowed to increase the frequency.

If AC were to start flying into SIN again, they will have the right aircraft to fly YYZ-LHR-SIN bypassing BOM.

Anyway some Canadian destinations are now served by via a code share agreement with AC (ironically) via LHR.



Welcome to my starry one world alliance, a team in the sky!
User currently offlineConnies4ever From Canada, joined Feb 2006, 4066 posts, RR: 13
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 6751 times:

YYZ- LAX -SYD is not going to happen anytime soon, but AC are operating with 77L YYZ - YVR -SYD daily, and it seems to be a success so far.

As to financial results, given today's operating environment, I believe their profit/loss situation will be dominated by how much and at what price they have hedged their fuel. Which pretty much is the same for all airlines. Our current $115 oil is likely not what they are paying (translated into Jet-1/1A).



Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
User currently offlineSebring From Canada, joined Jul 2004, 1663 posts, RR: 14
Reply 3, posted (6 years 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 6686 times:

The most recent concensus of financial analysts is that Air Canada will make a profit this year on the order of $1 per share, or about $100 million after tax. I wouldn't base any estimates of AC's performance on the load aboard a 777 in the middle of winter. I'm off to FRA on a 77W on Monday that shows five empty seats. And the Executive Class cabin is full - I don't know the mix of paid J versus upgrades off high Y fares, but it's full, and the belly will be full of cargo - that's a great cargo route.

Also, the Canadian domestic market is in much better shape than the US domestic market - capacity and demand are pretty well balanced in Canada. The Canada-US market is predominantly Canada-origin, which stands AC in particularly good stead - it's more of a challenge to US carriers. The transatlantic market is strong from what I hear, and when you consider the strength of the Euro, the inbound market offers a combination of large volumes and good yields. With the Olympics in Beijing, transpacific activity appears firm - and Oasis has just disappeared on the Vancouver-Hong Kong route.

As for the OP's comment about doing more esoteric routes, this is not AC's style. AC prefers to dominate certain corridors, adding flights to the well-travelled rather than engage in more far-flung adventurism that might not pay off. So AC does not fly to India, where it lost money, but will double up on LHR or FRA or China. The logic is that in these markets, it already staff, call centres, cargo GSA's, etc, and adding an extra flight, like YOW-FRA, has a low incremental cost and Star Alliance partner support, whereas launching something entirely new involves setting up an organization and selling a route without partner support.

Some of this will change when AC gets 787s because they will change the financial profile of serving some entirely new markets. But right now, AC's preference is to work with the tried and true and leverage strengths. Adding YOW-FRA, for example, builds on the LH relationship. AC and LH have a complete revenue sharing partnership on the North Atlantic, and extensive codesharing beyond FRA (or in LH's case, from Canadian airports to the US).

Quoting Ryanair!!! (Reply 1):
AC wasn't happy with SQ's ops into YYZ in the early 90s because the latter's strong branding began to affect AC's trans-Atlantic market. Lo and behold, SQ was yanked from YYZ and YVR today remains a measely 3 times weekly. The demand is there, but SQ is not allowed to increase the frequency.

Not quite, since SQ hadn't started flying to Toronto. It wanted in, and conducted a very vocal campaign that back-fired because it alienated the Canadian government which didn't want to look as if it was being bullied by a foreign airline. The situation is more complicated that you present it. AC had complained about protectionist measures employed by SQ that made the BOM-SIN part of the YYZ-BOM-SIN routing uneconomic. SQ objected to AC's pricing. So the problem was a mutual breakdown of the bilateral relationship. When SQ than tried to force its way into Toronto, via AMS, the Canadian government decided to abrogate the bilateral, and for years SQ could only serve YVR three times a week by fiat. Now, its current level of service to YVR has been entrenched in a new bilateral, but with little else. While the Canadian government has granted open skies to carriers of many countries, it has a preference for nonstop services between the contracting countries, and SQ has shown no interest in offering nonstop services to Canada from SIN, although it certainly has capable aircraft now to do it (it didn't in the late 1980s/early 1990s when this dispute originated).


User currently offlineEXAAUADL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (6 years 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6619 times:

It is important not to forget this:


1. For the first time probably since 1987, the Canadian aviation market is not in choas and seems to have found a steady equilibrium, somethign the US hasnt. The model for Canada amd Australia that works seems to be one LCC and one mainline legacy, with a few little regionals.

2. Oil prices havent risen as much in Euros or CDN or AUD as they have in USD. Example:

2001 1 USD = 1.60 CDN
Oil = $25 USD so Oil = $40 CDN

2008 1 USD = more or less 1 CDN
Oil = $110 USD so Oil = $110 CDN

Oil has more than quadrupled in USD but less than tripled in CDN.

In Euros is it even better
2001 1 USD = 1.20 Euro
Oil = $25 Euro = 30 Euro

2008 1 USD = .625 Euros
Oil = $110 Euro = 68.75 Euros

In Euro terms oil has barely doubled


User currently offlineEXAAUADL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (6 years 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 6607 times:

So if the USD hand not been devalued by the FED 2003-Present oil prices in USD would be $60-65, that with all things equal including the war in Iraq....Add in the wa and oil price rise caused by China and India demand is more like 50-55 dollars per barrell. There might be a additional impact due to speculators.

User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 6477 times:



Quoting EXAAUADL (Reply 5):
Add in the wa and oil price rise caused by China and India demand is more like 50-55 dollars per barrell.

Once again, incorrectly, this raises it's head. It is a fact, and clearly shown to be, that China and India use relatively little oil compared to other world countries.......so why is this repeatedly blamed on the current price? The current price of oil is what it is because of the combination of the devaluation of the US dollar, coupled with the ongoing destablisation of the Middle East, thus leading to speculative markets. It has nothing to do with China and India!! Out of interest, the US uses far more oil than either, yet you don't seem to see that as a factor.


User currently offlineDonder10 From Canada, joined Oct 2001, 6659 posts, RR: 22
Reply 7, posted (6 years 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 6413 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
Once again, incorrectly, this raises it's head. It is a fact, and clearly shown to be, that China and India use relatively little oil compared to other world countries.......so why is this repeatedly blamed on the current price? The current price of oil is what it is because of the combination of the devaluation of the US dollar, coupled with the ongoing destablisation of the Middle East, thus leading to speculative markets. It has nothing to do with China and India!! Out of interest, the US uses far more oil than either, yet you don't seem to see that as a factor.

Because price changes occur at the margin - most of the current INCREASE in demand for oil is coming from India and China and this is coming at a time of relatively tight supply and the fear of supply dusruptions.


User currently offlineYXXMIKE From Canada, joined Apr 2008, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 6352 times:



Quoting Donder10 (Reply 7):
Because price changes occur at the margin - most of the current INCREASE in demand for oil is coming from India and China and this is coming at a time of relatively tight supply and the fear of supply dusruptions.

I don't think we are in a tight supply market at the moment. I would say that we are in a heavy speculative market; this isn't the oil crisis of the seventies. I believe that a positive change in the white house might bring the price of oil down. Go Obama?

AC has restructured in a way that has them pushed to make money and they are proving that with the correct staff model and low cost (common sense) approach you can make little changes go a long way in saving money. I am a fan of both AC & WS and I don't see a reason that they wont survive this current market just as long as something stupid like a new airline decides to start up and compete with them! A new charter operator out west is something that is very badly needed as both AC & WS have more or less neglected a lot of the British Columbia & Alberta secondary markets; YMM, YXX, YXS, YLW etc.


User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24080 posts, RR: 22
Reply 9, posted (6 years 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 6332 times:



Quoting 744 (Thread starter):
How does or will Air Canada plan to go through this period of recession.

Canada isn't suffering as much from the recessionary conditions in the U.S. The sub-prime issues in the U.S. with mortgages being issued to people who couldn't afford the payments etc. have little or no impact in Canada.

Quoting 744 (Thread starter):
Last time I flew AC was on a 77W from YYZ - LHR. The plane was not even half full. Why would they have such a big aircraft if their loads are not too heavy.

Cargo generates a lot of revenue on AC's Europe routes. I recall a fairly recent AC news item mentioning that a FRA-YYZ 77W flight had carried 100,000 lbs. of cargo.


User currently offline744 From United States of America, joined Aug 2001, 447 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 6310 times:

Thank you guys for all your feedbacks. Good luck to our dear old AC!

User currently offlineYXXMIKE From Canada, joined Apr 2008, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 6292 times:



Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):
Canada isn't suffering as much from the recessionary conditions in the U.S. The sub-prime issues in the U.S. with mortgages being issued to people who couldn't afford the payments etc. have little or no impact in Canada

Trust me, it's being felt up here a lot! A lot of the tourism business in BC has been fueled by US visitors coming in because the US greenback was so much more powerful; now that the dollar is at par our US visitor numbers have dropped by more than half. BC is lucky that our European, Australian & New Zealand numbers are way up so the loss isn't being noticed as much as it could but Ontario and Quebec are starting to feel that pinch a lot more now.


User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2127 posts, RR: 9
Reply 12, posted (6 years 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 6064 times:



Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):
Canada isn't suffering as much from the recessionary conditions in the U.S. The sub-prime issues in the U.S. with mortgages being issued to people who couldn't afford the payments etc. have little or no impact in Canada.

Really? Tell that to the forestry industry workers in BC or the auto manufacturers & parts suppliers in central Canada.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineJMULAH From Spain, joined Nov 2007, 61 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5785 times:

YOW-LHR could use a few 773's in the route, everytime i fly on the 763's are always full if not almost full. Instead of using the over saturated market on the YYZ-LHR route YOW could be a great alternative. No BA or BMI and less frequency. It is quite a nice flight and you don't have to deal with Pearson's chaotic airport

User currently offlineJetlanta From United States of America, joined Jul 2001, 3147 posts, RR: 35
Reply 14, posted (6 years 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5667 times:



Quoting EXAAUADL (Reply 4):
1. For the first time probably since 1987, the Canadian aviation market is not in choas and seems to have found a steady equilibrium, somethign the US hasnt. The model for Canada amd Australia that works seems to be one LCC and one mainline legacy, with a few little regionals.

My friend, this is PRECISELY, the argument for consolidation in the U.S. Being a bigger country, you will see more of each type of carrier, but the premise is the same.


User currently offlineSunriseValley From Canada, joined Jul 2004, 4614 posts, RR: 5
Reply 15, posted (6 years 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 5636 times:



Quoting Threepoint (Reply 12):
or the auto manufacturers & parts suppliers in central Canada.

Their problem is that many of the parts suppliers are tied to the big three US manufacturers and have not succeeded in breaking into supplying the non U.S. manufacturers who are building assembly plants in Ontario and the Southern U.S. states.
Toyota are building a new plant about 50km from where I live; the number of new Japanese owned parts plants being built to support this operation are many. Sure they will hire local labor but it is unlikely that these will be displaced members of the Canadian Auto Workers.
GM have served notice to the CAW that they are are looking for a substantial reduction in labor costs at the large GM plant in Oshawa. On. They are claiming a $30 per hour cost disadvantage to the Japanese and Korean owned plants in the U.S. south.


User currently offlineYYZflyboy From Canada, joined May 2007, 26 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (6 years 1 day 12 hours ago) and read 5508 times:

Hi all,

I recently flew from Toronto to Tokyo and also Toronto to Hong Kong. I used to think United was cheapest to both destinations. I was surprised that Air Canada was extremely competitive. Usually, it's not the case.

With that in mind, why is that Americans (esp. United Mileage Plus/US Airways Dividend Miles members) aren't taking more of Air Canada's long-hauls, especially to Europe/Asia via YVR and YYZ? The prices are very competitive (or superior) compared to those of United and US Airways, plus service is comparable and the aircraft are usually better (esp. when comparing between United and Air Canada's long haul aircraft). The connection times (as well as ease of connection) in Vancouver/Toronto between the North American to long-haul flights (and vice-versa) are equal to those in UA's hubs (SFO/LAX/IAD/ORD/DEN). To top it off, all of Air Canada's flights are 100% mileage eligible for the above-mentioned frequent flier plans.

On the issue of SQ flying to Toronto - is it wise to do that though? The Singaporean community is not that large here. Although it would be nice to see them fly HKG-YYZ (and vice-versa), with a continuation to Singapore.

Just my thoughts. Please don't flame me!

[Edited 2008-04-19 18:44:42]

User currently offlineNimish From India, joined Feb 2005, 3171 posts, RR: 9
Reply 17, posted (6 years 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 5022 times:



Quoting Sebring (Reply 3):
The logic is that in these markets, it already staff, call centres, cargo GSA's, etc, and adding an extra flight, like YOW-FRA, has a low incremental cost and Star Alliance partner support, whereas launching something entirely new involves setting up an organization and selling a route without partner support.

This sounds very logical and makes maximum use of the *A relationships! I just hope for consistency from AC going forward - considering they launched and then stopped the Canada-India routes at least 2-3 times in the past years.



Latest Trip Report - GoAir BLR-BOM-BLR
User currently offlineJohnClipper From Hong Kong, joined Aug 2005, 826 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 4716 times:



Quoting YYZflyboy (Reply 16):
With that in mind, why is that Americans (esp. United Mileage Plus/US Airways Dividend Miles members) aren't taking more of Air Canada's long-hauls, especially to Europe/Asia via YVR and YYZ? The prices are very competitive (or superior) compared to those of United and US Airways, plus service is comparable and the aircraft are usually better (esp. when comparing between United and Air Canada's long haul aircraft). The connection times (as well as ease of connection) in Vancouver/Toronto between the North American to long-haul flights (and vice-versa) are equal to those in UA's hubs (SFO/LAX/IAD/ORD/DEN). To top it off, all of Air Canada's flights are 100% mileage eligible for the above-mentioned frequent flier plans.

I looked at AC for my upcoming trip from HKG back home to the US. The AC schedule to my home airport wasn't competitive with stops in YVR and YYZ. AC flies from YYZ to my destination airport in the US, but only two times a day. The return trip to HKG was even worse with a night stopover in YVR. I would love to use them, but the schedule doesn't cut it for me.


User currently offlineRP TPA From United States of America, joined Oct 1999, 852 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 4458 times:



Quoting JohnClipper (Reply 18):
AC flies from YYZ to my destination airport in the US, but only two times a day.

John....Which airport are you refering to?


User currently offlineJohnClipper From Hong Kong, joined Aug 2005, 826 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (6 years 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 4432 times:

CMH (Port Columbus). There are only 2 Jazz flights a day am and pm and the connections suck.

User currently offlineLH423 From Canada, joined Jul 1999, 6501 posts, RR: 54
Reply 21, posted (6 years 22 hours ago) and read 4296 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
Out of interest, the US uses far more oil than either, yet you don't seem to see that as a factor.

Yes, but the market realities already exist as having US as the world's largest consumer of oil. The US's economy isn't growing at 8-10% a year. In fact, if the US squeaks by without going into a recession, economic growth in the US will probably be less than 1%. India and China ARE putting a strain on oil supply because the demand that they have for oil is huge compared to what it was 10 or 15 years ago and it will only get worse. So, yes, the US is still number one in consumption but do you honestly expect the US (and other western nations who use on a per capita basis almost as much as the average American - Canadians and Australians come to mind) to reduce their consumption simply so India and China can continue their unbridled economic growth?

Of course, I believe they should do it for other reasons (environment, sustainability, etc) but the decisions I make every day to reduce my consumption of oil are not based on the reasoning that someone in Shanghai can start using the oil that I've conserved. In the end, we ALL need to reduce our consumption and dependency on oil. Americans, Chinese, Indians, Europeans, etc.

Quoting Threepoint (Reply 12):
Really? Tell that to the forestry industry workers in BC or the auto manufacturers & parts suppliers in central Canada.

Manufacturing and forestry in Central Canada are not hurt by the sub-prime mortgage issues in the US. The only Canadian economic sector reeling from that is financial. For instance, CIBC had to write off a few billion in loans that went bad in the US. Same with RBC, I think. What's hurting the manufacturing sector is a high dollar and a general economic malaise and a lack of consumer confidence in the US (which, partially is linked to the housing market but there are other variables at play).

Air Canada will, like every airline, take some hit from higher gas prices however airfares in Canada tend to be more stable than in the US. Occasionally you'll see bargain fares like $59 o/w on the YYZ-YUL/YOW routes or $150 o/w to London or Paris during the winter, but a comparison of airfares on the YYZ-YVR route and its US counterpart, JFK-LAX, shows that fares are generally higher on the former, largely due to the fact that there are only two airlines operating the flight compared to the 4 or 5 airlines that operate it in the States (I'm thinking DL, AA, UA, B6. Are there more?). So, while Canadians complain about higher airfares, especially compared to European or American prices, our airlines are, generally speaking, healthier.

On the international front, YYZ-LHR or YYZ-TYO has much less competition than JFK-LHR/TYO. Of course, the GTA is about 4.5 times smaller than metro New York, but even at that, the traffic between London and metro New York is insane. Also, the fact that Air Canada is the ONLY Canadian airline with intercontinental service means that, aside from those who will not fly AC under any circumstance due to whatever reason, AC is able to capitalize on a huge frequent flier base. Even those that prefer to fly Westjet domestically probably have an Aeroplan card for when they travel internationally. However, WS's rumoured admittance into oneworld could change this somewhat since WS fliers will have access to the oneworld network.

So, all-in-all, I think AC will be able to weather the storm. I think they've learnt from their mistakes in bankruptcy and, hopefully, management has learnt from some of the US airlines what NOT to do during the good times (i.e. talks of pissed off AAers because management showered themselves in bonuses during the profitable years. Now contracts are up and the profits are gone).

LH423



« On ne voit bien qu'avec le cœur. L'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux » Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
User currently offlineEXAAUADL From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 22, posted (6 years 21 hours ago) and read 4223 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 6):
Once again, incorrectly, this raises it's head. It is a fact, and clearly shown to be, that China and India use relatively little oil compared to other world countries.......so why is this repeatedly blamed on the current price? The current price of oil is what it is because of the combination of the devaluation of the US dollar, coupled with the ongoing destablisation of the Middle East, thus leading to speculative markets. It has nothing to do with China and India!! Out of interest, the US uses far more oil than either, yet you don't seem to see that as a factor.

it is all those things you mention....in absolute terms however, I believe China is now the worlds second largest consumer of oil, after the USA and has surpassed Japan. In term of oil used to get one dollar of GDP, China is probably among the least efficient nation in the world.

Reason this matters is oil production is really still based on consumption from 10 years ago. So when oil demand in China rises by roughly 10% per year, the excess capacity that existed 10 yearts ago, is gone. This then gives a message to speculators to come into the market place and make bets that this event or that event will cause even higher prices increases. China and to a lesser extent India have eaten into the world's excess capacity.

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):
Canada isn't suffering as much from the recessionary conditions in the U.S. The sub-prime issues in the U.S. with mortgages being issued to people who couldn't afford the payments etc. have little or no impact in Canada.

Correct, though some Canadian banks did buy mortage back securites from the USA. I do think that the strong CDN has pushed ON and PQ very close to recession. Meanwhile the opther provinces, especially AB, BC and NFLD are booming, with the remaining provinces doing ok.

Quoting LH423 (Reply 21):
Yes, but the market realities already exist as having US as the world's largest consumer of oil. The US's economy isn't growing at 8-10% a year.

This is correct. The fact that the US is such a large consumer isnt the reason for high oil prices as the US has been the largest consumer for decades. So the market long ago account for the fact the US is the largest consumer. What is new is China and India being new large, as someone above state, consumer on the margin.

The US is infact quite efficient. To support 4% GDP growth in the US, oil demand rises by about 1% annually. 0-1% GDP growth as the US is experiencing now translates to a 1-2% decline in oil demand.....See: This Week In Petroleum....Meanwhile in China to support 10% GDP growth requires an increas in demand of at least 10%.


User currently offlineThreepoint From Canada, joined Oct 2005, 2127 posts, RR: 9
Reply 23, posted (6 years 20 hours ago) and read 4184 times:



Quoting LH423 (Reply 21):
Manufacturing and forestry in Central Canada are not hurt by the sub-prime mortgage issues in the US.

Are you maybe misinterpreting what I wrote? I referred to 'forestry' and 'manufacturing in central Canada' separately. The forestry I refer to is in the Canadian far west and far east predominantly and is most definitely negatively affected by the current sub-prime crisis in the US. There's a 'perfect storm' of coincidental factors that have knocked the forestry industry on its knees (US recession, at-par dollars, pine beetle explosion in western Canada, ongoing tariff battles, high cost of oil affecting transport, etc) and among them is the lack of demand in housing in the US, created by the looming (present?) recession, which in turn has been exacerbated by the sub-prime crisis.

Back on track, the forestry woes mean little to AC's bottom line. Not many executives traveled commercially, but several large timber companies have divested themselves of assets including private aircraft.



The nice thing about a mistake is the pleasure it gives others.
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24080 posts, RR: 22
Reply 24, posted (6 years 17 hours ago) and read 4068 times:



Quoting Threepoint (Reply 12):
Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 9):
Canada isn't suffering as much from the recessionary conditions in the U.S. The sub-prime issues in the U.S. with mortgages being issued to people who couldn't afford the payments etc. have little or no impact in Canada.

Really? Tell that to the forestry industry workers in BC or the auto manufacturers & parts suppliers in central Canada.

I didn't say there was no impact. I said Canada was not suffering AS MUCH. I think that's true but obviously there are exceptions. What I was specifically referring to was that Canadian home owners are not having their mortgages foreclosed to the same extent as in the U.S. due to the sub-prime issues.


25 Threepoint : Well, you did. Not to belabor the point, but your words were: "The sub-prime issues in the US...have little to no impact in Canada". I simply gave ex
26 Viscount724 : I see your point. Thanks.
27 Ryanair!!! : Singapore Airlines, as you see, do not depend solely on Singaporeans living overseas for business. Their main bulk of traffic would be 6th freedom on
28 Threepoint : Exactly. It's this business model that has helped lead to to the frosty relations with the Canadian authorities, as SQ don't want to serve YVR non-st
29 YYZflyboy : Don't forget Asiana Airways too!
30 FlyCMH : Jazz currently flies YYZ-CMH 3x daily, all on Dash-8-100s. We get a 4th flight next month, which will RON in CMH and fly out the next day as a 6:45AM
31 Threepoint : They don't fly the ICN-YVR route; I believe they codeshare with AC. But I get your point.
32 Yyz717 : Singapore (the state) has an atrocious human rights record (by Western standards). I believe Canada can and should restrict any further bilateral fre
33 GuyBetsy1 : Er.. what? What are you talking about? The only atrocious human rights record is that they cane criminal offenders and this certainly deters them fro
34 Connector4you : Yeah if you want a great flying experience take Air Canada for a domestic round-trip Vancouver to Toronto (5 hours leg) with state of the art individ
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