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Starboard Doors - Ever Used? Excluding Emergencies  
User currently offlineHypersonic From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2005, 149 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 23 hours ago) and read 8499 times:

Just been thinking about this.
Most modern passenger aircraft seem to have their doors mirrored on both sides port & starboard.
However it always seems that it is the Port doors (front & sometimes rear), that get used for embarking / disembarking.
With this in mind... & putting aside the obvious use of emergency exiting.

Do the starboard doors 'ever' get used for boarding etc? - Or are they for the most part redundant?

Cheers
Hyper

57 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineGrozzy From Australia, joined Oct 2007, 155 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8487 times:

AFAIK, the starboard doors are usually used for catering and services, while port side are used for passengers

User currently offlineAAMDanny From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2008, 351 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8436 times:

My Ground Handling lecturer told me it’s to do with the turnaround process as Grozzy mentioned.

Pax in and out on the left side.

Catering in and out on the right. (And in theory most of the Baggage/Cargo for most Aircraft)

I guess it makes pretty much good sense, utilise all the space around the aircraft for an efficient turn-around.
However I’m sure there are instances and exceptions where right-hand side boarding has been used.

Danny

(By the way this is my first ever post on A.Net!!!)


User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8425 times:

Some A/C has what is called a service door on the starboard side. good example is the Mad Dog or the CRJ. The door is actually smaller than the regular boarding door and is not designed for such, but rather is only used for servicing the A/C and emergencies.


What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineCB97 From Canada, joined Mar 2008, 90 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8415 times:

The bridge designs on most airports also dictate that the port side be used for boarding, as does the design of the a/c. The forward galleys are on the starboard side, as are most of the baggage compartment doors. The basic concept is to keep passenger movements on the one side and all servicing on the other to help prevent the passengers from getting run over when boarding stairs are used. Fueling is done mostly on the starboard side, but that is back by the wing, and the rear doors are used for catering and also for grooming trucks so both sides are used. It depends on the individual aircraft as to the exact configuration of doors and servicing panels, but that is the general pattern.

Perhaps someone with more knowledge of airplane history can tell me if this might be related to the old cavalry tradition of mounting horses from the left. Since most people are right handed the swords were carried on the left hip, which led to the left side mounting and dismounting.

CB


User currently offlineFlyASAGuy2005 From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 7004 posts, RR: 11
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8346 times:



Quoting CB97 (Reply 4):

To add on to that, it also depends on the specific airline and normal airport operations.

Take Delta for example, the trash truck is usually hooked up to the rear PORT door and everything else on the starboard side. But this is purely for logistics purposes and to kind of knock everything out at the same time. But the general rule of thumb is for everything to be done on the starboard side out of the sight of passengers and safety reasons.

What's strange though, CRJ's and ERJ's has the baggage compartment on the port side so you can't avoid that aspect but for all large airliners as far as I know, baggage is on the right.



What gets measured gets done.
User currently offlineN707PA From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 279 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8346 times:

TWA used a couple of gates at JFK with boarding on the starboard side.

The 747 closest to the camera:
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Photo © Joe Pries - ATR Team



L-1011 at the old National terminal
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Photo © George Gayuski



User currently offlineHelvknight From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 22 hours ago) and read 8304 times:



Quoting CB97 (Reply 4):
Perhaps someone with more knowledge of airplane history can tell me if this might be related to the old cavalry tradition of mounting horses from the left. Since most people are right handed the swords were carried on the left hip, which led to the left side mounting and dismounting.

I think it is more with the fact that a lot of aviation practices carried over from maritime practices. Ships were always boarded from the port side (that's why it's called port) and aviation continued the tradition. Of course once the practice is in place airports were designed to work with it basically setting it in stone.

Quoting FlyASAGuy2005 (Reply 3):
Some A/C has what is called a service door on the starboard side. good example is the Mad Dog or the CRJ

ERJ as well.


User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3976 posts, RR: 34
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8294 times:

The dH Comet 4 had the main pax boarding through the fwd Starboard door. The Fwd port door was much smaller and only for galley service.
I always wonder why that was. Anyone know?


User currently offlineFiatstilojtd From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8292 times:



Quoting AAMDanny (Reply 2):
However I’m sure there are instances and exceptions where right-hand side boarding has been used.

Yes, on a KLM Cityhopper Flight (F70 or was it a F100  scratchchin  ) AMS-VIE after landing the cabin crew and cockpit crew were unable to open the front left door, so we had to disembark via the smaller front right door.

Quoting AAMDanny (Reply 2):
(By the way this is my first ever post on A.Net!!!)

Welcome  bigthumbsup 


User currently offlineNzrich From New Zealand, joined Dec 2005, 1521 posts, RR: 1
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8278 times:

Another thing on the 733 and other 737's the starboard doors are smaller than the port doors


"Pride of the pacific"
User currently offlineAstockla From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2006, 127 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8269 times:

Last summer I flew on an A319 from Calama to Santiago in Chile, and we boarded by the Starboard door - felt really wierd actually...


above us is only sky
User currently offlineBurkhard From Germany, joined Nov 2006, 4384 posts, RR: 2
Reply 12, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8235 times:



Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 8):
The dH Comet 4 had the main pax boarding through the fwd Starboard door. The Fwd port door was much smaller and only for galley service.
I always wonder why that was. Anyone know?

You really wonder that the British mix left an right ?


User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8442 posts, RR: 10
Reply 13, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8231 times:
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I only ever used the starboard door twice and both times it was a SAA 747 at Ilha do Sal.


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After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineBDL2STL2PVG From China, joined Jun 2006, 150 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8168 times:

I clearly recall using the starboard door on a few occasions when flying TWA thru JFK. Once off a doestic L-10 flight (STL-JFK) and also on an Int'l 767 arrival (MXP-JFK).

I am also farily certain that occured in Melbourne (in Australia). This goes back to the late 80's not to long after UA started serving there, as i recall the UA 747SPs could use at least one starboard borading gate.


User currently offlineDalavia From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 543 posts, RR: 1
Reply 15, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8134 times:

It's a long while ago now, but in 1982 I had a flight on a CAAC Il-14, and boarding was through the rear starboard door. I recall climbing what I thought was a very flimsy, very steep tubular steel ladder.

User currently offlineAAMDanny From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2008, 351 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 21 hours ago) and read 8116 times:



Quoting Burkhard (Reply 12):
Quoting TristarSteve (Reply 8):
The dH Comet 4 had the main pax boarding through the fwd Starboard door. The Fwd port door was much smaller and only for galley service.
I always wonder why that was. Anyone know?

You really wonder that the British mix left an right ?

Agreed. British always like to do things the complete oposite way purely because we love to annoy the rest of the world with our crazy Britishness.

As for them TWA pictures posted by N707PA, it looks like the terminal was desinged to utilise as many jetways as it could from the boarding areas, and from the looks of it from the posistion of that particular gate it seemed to most logical way to put it due to the design of the terminal.


User currently offlineBohica From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 2668 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 8068 times:

I once deplaned an AA 747 at ORD through the starboard door. (Along time ago) UA had a gate at the old DEN airport where they boarded their DC-10's throgh the 2R door. I have also seen pictures of PA at JFK where they had jetways at the 1L&R and 2L&R doors.

User currently offlineCanadianNorth From Canada, joined Aug 2002, 3389 posts, RR: 9
Reply 18, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 20 hours ago) and read 7974 times:



Quoting Nzrich (Reply 10):
Another thing on the 733 and other 737's the starboard doors are smaller than the port doors

Same for the 737-200. Although all four doors seem to work basically the same, the two starboard doors are a couple inches shorter than the port ones. When I worked in grooming we usually did all our stuff from the port side as well, but the fwd starboard door had to be opened to remove the garbage can in the fwd galley, and I found that although I could just fit upright through the left door, the right door only came up to about shoulder level, ish. The aft right door we rarely used (unless it was just sitting in the hangar being detailed we never really had a need to open it, and keeping it closed reduces changes of the APU sucking in anything), but I do remember it being a similar size to the fwd right door.


CanadianNorth



What could possibly go wrong?
User currently offlineCarduelis From United Kingdom, joined Dec 2001, 1585 posts, RR: 10
Reply 19, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 7908 times:

Not that there's any change in the basic discussion, but unlike ships that have port and starboard, all aircraft use the terminology of LEFT and RIGHT. Bon Voyages!


Per Ardua ad Astra! ........ Honi Soit Qui Mal y Pense!
User currently offlineNWADC9 From United States of America, joined May 2004, 4896 posts, RR: 10
Reply 20, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 19 hours ago) and read 7874 times:

The only "airliner" I can think of that boards on the right is the Cessna Caravan (generally).

Quoting Carduelis (Reply 19):
Not that there's any change in the basic discussion, but unlike ships that have port and starboard, all aircraft use the terminology of LEFT and RIGHT.

They use both.



Flying an aeroplane with only a single propeller to keep you in the air. Can you imagine that? -Capt. Picard
User currently offlineSWABrian From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 299 posts, RR: 2
Reply 21, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 7806 times:

Besides the 737 service doors being smaller, the DC-9 and MD-80 have significantly smaller right hand doors--can't remember on the DC-8. However, I did board a Continental DC-10 in HNL through the forward right hand door in the early 80s. When I worked for Delta in PDX we had to deplane/board an L-1011 through the No. 3 door behind the wing on the left side due to an inop jetway.

User currently offlineMaxfly From Austria, joined Oct 2003, 100 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 18 hours ago) and read 7785 times:

They did that a couple of years ago in MUC - when LH operated their flights to SFO and LAX with B744s (and still from T-1 as T-2 hadn't been completed), they actually used two gates to board the passengers, the starboard gate/airbridge (door 2) for Biz and the port one (door 3) for Economy and First...at least I seem to remember it like that..

User currently offlineSR100 From UK - England, joined Dec 2005, 109 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7595 times:

Pre WW II airplanes had mostly the passenger door on the starboard side, e.g. the DC-2 and DC-3, Boeing 247. Only WWII DC-3s had it from a certain moment on the port side.

The Convair 240 had a configuration for American Airlines, which still had a starboard passenger door with integrated stairways right after the flight deck, all other CV-240 had the rear port main door.

I remember that boarding the Comet 4/B/C was sometimes through both doors, the starboard forward door and the rear port door - and that was the last aircraft for some time with this feature until the launch of the widebody jets. At that time in the late 60s, early 70s, it was the intention to board the jet from both sides, while being docked at a finger. I guess, standardization of procedures was the main reason, why this was done only at a few airports, and/or parking positions.

Quoting SWABrian (Reply 21):
can't remember on the DC-8

On all DC-8 versions, the starboard doors were a few inches smaller, but still much larger than those very small doors on a Boeing 707/720. However, some airlines had also larger doors on the 707 and 720, e.g. American had a larger front starboard door, United had both starboard service doors on the 720 quite large.

Quoting SWABrian (Reply 21):
the DC-9 and MD-80 have significantly smaller right hand doors

with the exception of the DC-9-31s of Eastern. They had quite a large right hand service door and I actually never understood, why this size of a door was not used with the MD-80 at a time, most competitor aircrafts had larger service doors.



My favourite planes flown: Lockheed 188 Electra, Tridents, VC-10, B-707, L-1011, A330, E90 + Concorde
User currently offlineSurfrider1978 From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 292 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (6 years 2 months 3 weeks 1 day 17 hours ago) and read 7564 times:

Starboard doors are used at times for the loading and unloading of a handicapped passenger at airports that do not utilize jetways. I have had to do this many times on my days at LGB and BUR.

25 Paparadzi : On the B737, pax can embark / disembark from starboard side during an engine running transit. If the APU becomes unserviceable, and the GTSU is unserv
26 LHR777 : We use port and starboard for tech items, left and right for passenger-related items at the carrier I work at. We'd say "there's Klingons on the star
27 Post contains images KingAir200 : Yep. EA's and some of RW's DC-9s had the bigger 1R door. RW had 9s with both small and large 1R doors. [Edited 2008-05-02 11:46:23]
28 SWABrian : Actually, the CV-240 had three door options. Some airlines like Western, chose the ventral stairway for the entry (similar to the Martinliners). I th
29 Post contains images Viscount724 : The rear port side door was usually used for Comet 4 passenger boarding. That was probably a carry-over from the piston era when the main passenger d
30 SR100 : There were even four versions for the CV-240 according 'The Convair Twins 240 to 640', by Gary L. Killion, published by MacDonald and Jane's Airline
31 Post contains links Aviateur : It happens at Kennedy somewhat frequently with planes that are parked out on the apron. This same question was addressed in this column... The trials
32 Post contains images Andz : Oh really....
33 Viscount724 : I think SR100 is referring only to aircraft built as passenger DC-3s before WW II. The captions of the photos in your reply indicate that the aircraf
34 Post contains links Abrelosojos : From my TR last year: http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo...ums/trip_reports/read.main/115832/ Cheers, A.
35 Railker : At airports without bridges, where airstairs are used, there are "MALT Trucks" (that's what WestJet calls them, at least. Or 'Mobi-Lift for the hand-c
36 STT757 : I remember flying EWR-TPA on a Eastern L-1011 around '82/'83, they were using two boarding bridges (one on each side) at EWR.
37 TristarSteve : I stand corrected. I only ever flew a Comet once, when G-APMA was the sole surviving BEA Comet 4B in 1970 and I got on it in Orly to fly to LHR throu
38 ETA Unknown : Don't know if still done, but a former frequent occurence with BA 747's at the BA JFK terminal.
39 N1120A : I have never done a starboard side jetway boarding, but I have done exited a plane from the starboard side on air stairs. Off the top of my head I rem
40 Boeingluvr : There are some cases at ground loading bases where the starboard doors are used to the loading of pax requiring assistance such as wheelchair pax. The
41 NYCAAer : At AA's old terminal at JFK ( the one currently being torn down), I remember working several flights on a DC-10 to the West Coast where we would use t
42 MrBrightSide : Actually, happened last year on A346 LH453 MUC-SFO. Instead of boarding on H02, we were placed onto buses and then transported to a remote gate. It w
43 Super80 : it may be a bit off topic! But how about Cargo planes? How come they don't put the Cargo Door on the starboard side ???
44 OPNLguy : Come to think about, I think Arnold did so too, in LAX, going to some place in South America, in the movie "Commando." Then again, he did do that hal
45 Andz : Thanks, I will have a look and see if there are photos of such aircraft.
46 Jimbobjoe : Speaking of Britishness, I would have sworn I saw drawings of Terminal 5 depicting an aircraft sitting at a gate with the jetty connected to the right
47 COSPN : it may be a bit off topic! But how about Cargo planes? How come they don't put the Cargo Door on the starboard side ??? So you can work both sides Upp
48 IrregKing : I remember that at MUC back in the time when LH was still at T1 and used the 744's on flights to SFO or LAX ('99/'00), they boarded them through both
49 Cricket : In BOM during the monsoons due to the winds domestic planes are often de-boarded from R1 through airstairs
50 AirNZ : Actually no, and it's neither the reason or tradition you think. In actual fact, mounting horses from the left is much more basic and stems from the
51 Post contains links and images Gr8Circle : AI 707's all had smaller doors on the right side....enlarge the pic below to see them.... View Large View MediumPhoto © TriplET
52 SR100 : If you look at American's B-707-123, then you will see the large front starboard service door, which is of similar size like the B-727-200 front righ
53 A380forana : For the latest flights of the day arriving at HND operated by Wide bodies (especially the 744-D, ANA uses both starboard (fwd and central) and port (f
54 Viscount724 : It looks like large or small galley service doors were options at least on the 707-120 series (and 720). AA's had the large door at the front and the
55 Post contains links and images UAL747 : Yes they are! Picture courteous of me: UAL
56 Pnwtraveler : I recall using the dual gate arrangement, with the right gate leaving from door 1 on the right side and the left door from door 2. This was used with
57 JetJeanes : They are not boarding R2 i those pics look closer,, Your boarding r2 those jetways went to r2, on smaller ships 727,737,dc0, those cater doors are way
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