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How Long Until Airlines Weigh You At Checkin?  
User currently offlineConcordeBoy From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 5774 times:

...the question begs to be asked.





To me, I'm surprised it hasn't already been implemented--- privacy be damned, they could call it a "safety" measure.
And to be honest, they'd probably have a good argument there, as it could allow them to more precisely calculate balance, loading, etc.

But of course, more importantly (to them, that is); it can allow them to far more accurately determine the amount of fuel carriage needed in order to complete the flight, while remaining in acceptable margins of safety as per regulations.


What say you types?

[Edited 2008-05-22 00:24:28]

78 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineBabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 1, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 15 hours ago) and read 5763 times:

Personally I think it's a great idea and the sooner the better. I make 4 flts a month minimum and that would be a great way to keep track of my weight.

I think some people don't realize how big they really are.


User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9407 posts, RR: 29
Reply 2, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5732 times:

Would be a sure fire way into profitability for US carriers. But you have to look at the draw backs as well. People who exceed the average weight by more than 100% would be automatically entitled to a second seat or sue the airline for 100 Million Dollars or compensation if the flight is over booked.

Or - Sir/Madam, you have just exceeded the total weight for this flight by 10 kgs. May I suggest you go to the rest rooms and come back to the scales in 10 minutes?


 Yeah sure



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineChristao17 From Thailand, joined Apr 2005, 941 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5700 times:

Actually, it isn't a bad idea. A percentage of your fare is based on simply having the seat and getting from point A to point B, but another percentage is based on the additional weight you are adding to the flight. Logic would have it that children would get a lower fare because they would be below the average weight.

You pay to ship cargo the same way and fees for checked bags are also handled similarly, so why not have a weight surcharge. For frequent travelers it would be an incentive to exercise more and slim down!

If enough of your customers lost weight, you really could claim to offer more room throughout coach!

Ha ha!



Keeping the "civil" in civil aviation...
User currently offlineBurkhard From Germany, joined Nov 2006, 4397 posts, RR: 2
Reply 4, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5688 times:

Back to the routes. This was done in early aviation. And a weight component in the ticket prize is nothing but fair - why should light people pay for heavy ones, the current system is pure socialism to have everybody pay the same.

User currently offlineBurkhard From Germany, joined Nov 2006, 4397 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5688 times:

Sorry, meant roots! Apologize.

User currently offlineGraphic From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5665 times:

The airlines base their weights and balances (and therefore fuel load) on an average passenger weight already, so unless you're on a very small plane with a few very large individuals, you wouldn't see a drastic change to the weights and fuel loads, at least not enough of a change to offset the cost of running such a scheme.



[Edited 2008-05-22 01:23:18]

User currently offlineFlashFlyGuy From Australia, joined Jan 2007, 439 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 14 hours ago) and read 5640 times:

Quoting Burkhard (Reply 4):
Back to the routes. This was done in early aviation.

Like so;



I wonder how much the dead fox weighed?  Big grin

[Edited 2008-05-22 01:48:18]

User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9407 posts, RR: 29
Reply 8, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5618 times:

Now, fun aside, I hate to spoil the idea, but it would cost the airlines too much money to realize such "weight" fares. You might as well charge a weight/volume fare, whichever is greater and have everybody step through a scanner to determine your chargeable weight. That would be the cargo approach.

The problem with that is, you would need thousands of these scanners at check-in and at least the same amount of staff monitoring and collecting the fares. This would be an avalanche of additional costs which would eat up more than the eventiual benefits might be.

In times where kiosk check -in is becoming old fashioned and many people print their boarding passes at home or in the office or check in by using cell phones, board at self-boarding gates and meet the first airline employee when stepping on board pof the aircraft,

The last thing airlines want would be to build up that work force again they just have made obsolete by state of the art techniques.



.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineSMF711 From United States of America, joined Jan 2008, 24 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5611 times:

Now it would be great if they would weigh you, measure your height, take your shoe size, and shoulder width. Then suggest the right seat (and price) for your body type and allow you to upgrade to wider seats and more legroom.
I weigh 225 lbs., am 6'1", and have a size 11 shoe.
Where do I sign up?


User currently offlinePlymSpotter From Spain, joined Jun 2004, 11655 posts, RR: 60
Reply 10, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5581 times:

You still do have to be weighed when flying in various small commercial aircraft like the BN Islander, it's quite novel to weight your bags on the belt and then step up yourself to be weighed. I can see though that the 'average' traveller would have screaming tantrums at the very idea of this.


Dan  Smile



...love is just a camouflage for what resembles rage again...
User currently offlineOHLHD From Finland, joined Dec 2004, 3962 posts, RR: 25
Reply 11, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5568 times:

That will never happen. Simple as that.

User currently offlinePanHAM From Germany, joined May 2005, 9407 posts, RR: 29
Reply 12, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 5530 times:



Quoting SMF711 (Reply 9):
Now it would be great if they would weigh you, measure your height, take your shoe size, and shoulder width. Then suggest the right seat (and price) for your body type and allow you to upgrade to wider seats and more legroom.
I weigh 225 lbs., am 6'1", and have a size 11 shoe.
Where do I sign up?

It is available, they call it business class, or first in the US.

Quoting PlymSpotter (Reply 10):
You still do have to be weighed when flying in various small commercial aircraft like the BN Islande

yes, and there it does not complicate matters or delays check in as the hand full of people fitting in these tiny planes. I was once alone with another passenger on a flight from FLG to PHX in a Beech1900, they put us on the last seat row, simple and no efforts.

Try to board anything over 100 seats with weighing every passenger, people would queue up for hours outside terminal buildings.

.



E's passed on! That parrot is no more! He has ceased to be! E's expired and gone to meet 'is maker!
User currently offlineDispatchguy From United States of America, joined Jan 2006, 1249 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 12 hours ago) and read 5507 times:



Quoting Burkhard (Reply 4):
And a weight component in the ticket prize is nothing but fair - why should light people pay for heavy ones, the current system is pure socialism to have everybody pay the same.

But no matter what, you're all occupying the same seat. So why shouldnt the fare be, theoretically, the same. The incremental cost in additional fuel for any given passenger is minimal at best.

And never does anyone pay the same fare...



Nobody screws you better than an airline job!
User currently offlineYWG747 From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 251 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5363 times:

I would not be surprised to see be implimented by the end of the year.
Charge you 1 dollar for every pound over your "ideal" weight set out by the governement.
Isnt that about 180lbs for somone who is 6'?
What ever it is, I can see the airlines making a wack of cash.


User currently offlineBabybus From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 10 hours ago) and read 5363 times:

As we all know some people fill their seat, and half of yours. If the big guy wants to take up more than one seat he really should pay for it.

People with fuller figures could be weighed at the gate, and left on standby till enough spare weight becomes available. Just like we did with oversized bags in the past.


User currently offlineEnginebird From United States of America, joined May 2007, 342 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 9 hours ago) and read 5214 times:



Quoting YWG747 (Reply 14):
Charge you 1 dollar for every pound over your "ideal" weight set out by the governement.
Isnt that about 180lbs for somone who is 6'?

Well, why should taller people be allowed to be heavier than shorter ones? If the airlines would really want to put these ridiculous weight fares into place they would have to charge by absolute weight, as this is the only factor relevant for fuel burn.

I personally do not think that a weight surcharge would help airlines overcome problems caused by skyrocketing oil prices.


User currently offlineYWG747 From Canada, joined Feb 2008, 251 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 8 hours ago) and read 5124 times:



Quoting Enginebird (Reply 16):
why should taller people be allowed to be heavier than shorter ones?

Talk to the Canadian and American medical societies.
They are the ones that set out the standard


User currently offlineN353SK From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 823 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4920 times:

I think this wouldn't work because the Actual average passenger weight is probably more than the standard passenger weight airlines use now (180lbs. I think, this includes carry on bags).

User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 19, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4883 times:

January 1991 - Cheyenne Wyoming - last time I WAS weighed before boarding a commercial passenger aircraft.

User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21532 posts, RR: 60
Reply 20, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4876 times:



Quoting Christao17 (Reply 3):
A percentage of your fare is based on simply having the seat and getting from point A to point B, but another percentage is based on the additional weight you are adding to the flight.

Bzzzzzzz. No, it's not.  Wink Well, at least "getting from A to B" is inclusive of fuel, otherwise, you can't get anywhere.

Passenger airlines are not exclusively freight companies, they transport people on the main deck. People are measured in units, not weight.

A standard ticket provides a seat to one human unit.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineChase From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 1054 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4831 times:

Probably not implementable, but I think it's fair. Something like:

$? per mile, to cover salaries of flight attendants and pilots
$? per pound of body + baggage weight per mile, to cover fuel
$? per bag to pay rampers' salaries (maybe take baggage weight into account here too?)
$? per segment to cover gate agents, terminal rent
$? or ?% premium for non-stop
$? or ?% premium for buying ticket within ? days of departure
$? per mile or per segment to cover corporate costs
All food/drink = BOB


User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 22, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4797 times:



Quoting OHLHD (Reply 11):
That will never happen. Simple as that.

I agree. But if it does really happen, just wait until those pesky ACLU lawyers start bringing lawsuits here in the U.S.



A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineContrails From United States of America, joined Oct 2000, 1833 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 4 hours ago) and read 4761 times:

Why stop at weight? Why not take measurements too? That way the airlines would ensure that pax weren't being encroached by someone with more ample than average measurements. They could charge extra for being overweight, and could refuse to provide snacks on the grounds that those with more ample than average measurements don't need them.

I do hope nobody at AA is reading this.



Flying Colors Forever!
User currently offlineA342 From Germany, joined Jul 2005, 4682 posts, RR: 3
Reply 24, posted (6 years 4 months 5 days 3 hours ago) and read 4700 times:

I'd say this could be introduced purely for more precise weight calculation, not for charging the passengers.

Integrate a scale into the floor in front of the check-in desk. The pax, with their carry-on luggage, step on it and get weighed during the check-in process, without wasting time.

To make it less embarrassing for everyone, the check-in agent doesn't need to see the weight, it would just be transmitted to the computer. And for the pax, there could be a button and display: "Do you want to know your weight? Press yes or no."




Am I wasting too many thoughts on this?  biggrin 



Exceptions confirm the rule.
25 PanHAM : yes, people are not checking in at desks any longer. They check in at home or in the taxi, eventually at a kiosk/ check-in kmachine. Only those trave
26 TWAL1011727 : The problem with your second half statment is....flight plans are made up usually 60-120 minutes before the flight. If you waited for all people to "
27 MedAv : It obviously will never happen due to discrimination lawsuits, etc. As much as I hate being squeezed by a big or fat guy sitting in the next seat, man
28 UAL-Fan : Have you all forgotten where we live. Here in the U.S., the land of lawsuits for even looking at people the wrong way, and crazed political correctnes
29 Web : Pax wouldn't even have to know they are being weighed. Scales could be integrated into the floors at the gate (where everyone has to pass through) an
30 Burkhard : What I like most about this thread that we are not sure if we should take it as humor or not - so it is a nice caricature of the state of the industr
31 Kalvado : lets go a little further.. just for fun : $$$ /number of pax on board to cover airframe lease/appreciation cost and fuel burn of empty plane (we're s
32 Chase : This is the best idea in the world!!
33 Mayor : Except for the time problem with working up the flight plan, I like this idea, except don't charge. It could be for weight & balance purposes, only. I
34 PanHAM : Hard to tell if all the people posting such ideas and replieing are serious or just make fun. From an operational and an economical point of view it d
35 Mayor : There's alot of cargo moving out there that isn't containerized or palletized but bulk loaded on narrow bodies. This is where it would be most helpfu
36 DavidkunzVIE : Those who are slim enough should be entitled to more excess baggage. It seems ridiculous that those fatties you regularly see at airports (and usually
37 Bond007 : Well, it really couldn't. I simply don't see any good reasoning behind doing this. In terms of pricing - the contract is get ME from A to B and my ti
38 Mayor : Not a bad idea. My idea wasn't so much for balance issues as most large a/c aren't that sensitive unless they're flying almost empty. When we first s
39 PanHAM : No kidding? I am a 42+ year old veteran in airfreight, If I had a Dollar for every kilo that was left behind I'd be a millionaire. Have you ever hear
40 Mayor : I think it's more of a problem with narrow bodies than it is with wide bodies, tho. At DL, it seems as though we had the flexibility to load cargo at
41 OHLHD : Good question. I see it with humor since as I said won´t happen. No it is not working like that. For weightcalculation you assume that every adult p
42 BAViscount : I believe (correct me if I'm wrong) that Aurigny balance their loads on their BN Trislander flights based on whether you are male or female, presumab
43 Mayor : This reminds me of a story our weight & balance instructor told us. Seems a DC-9 took off but it seemed very sluggish to the flight crew. The F/O wen
44 PanHAM : A320 + 321 narrow bodies are palletized same as wide bodies. I think it's more of a problem with all air cargo, you don't have a container just stand
45 Bond007 : I think his point was that it could/should work like that. If you are 500lb less total pax weight in the cabin, because everyone weighed less than yo
46 NorthStarDC4M : 1st> US and Canada (i don't know the rest of the world well enough so i wont commend), no one is gonna try it unless they have a 100% clad perfect leg
47 Mayor : No scanners at DL at the present time. Been several attempts to develop a scanner system but as far as I know, none in the forseeable future. The cur
48 Beeski : I was weighed for my flight today....well, asked my weight by the Gate Agent. No big ting mon. Seaborne Airlines Twin Otter seaplane DH6-300 from St.
49 OOer : Weigh you with your carryon items.... Up to 200lb = standart ticket purchase +$1 R/T for every pound over 200lb Very fair and simple....put a scale in
50 LEEDS19 : I can imagine the check in conversation with the Rookie Check -in Staff "Excuse me sir " do you mind if we weigh you for the flight today" "And why do
51 Superfly : ConcordeBoy: Don't give these airline CEOs any more bad ideas. Don't count on it.
52 Vhqpa : That is an ingenious way of doing it. This happened when I went on Helicopter flight at Seaworld I was just told to stand in the taped rectangle on t
53 Ikramerica : Neither fair nor simple, and very, very discriminatory. I love how people choose to discriminate as long as they know it won't impact them. "What a p
54 Ikramerica : Just to illustrate: A man who is 6'3" is "normal" even if they are 200 pounds if you go by the very flawed BMI. Which means you are telling a perfectl
55 Superfly : This will never happen and airliners are in the business to make money, not to be health advisors.
56 Aussie747 : Following on from this it is an attack on our civil liberties. To be charged according to our weight is completely wrong and unjustified. For many th
57 Dkf747 : My powerchair weighs more than 200 lbs. How do they weigh me at check-in? Just putting a scale in the floor isn't going to work.
58 Mayor : I don't think the premise of the OP was that they should charge for the extra weight, just make sure everyone is weighed so the weights are more accur
59 LAXdude1023 : Im 6'6 and weigh only 180. Maybe I could trade some width for some extra legroom. Seriously, Im almost sure that nobody would fly an airline that did
60 OOer : It is fair...it costs airlines more to carry you around than someone overweight at 180... Thats the problem with society...discrimination this discri
61 PanHAM : Sorry, did not know that DL operates still in the dark ages. BTW, one of the reasons why US carriers don't make money and stumble from one chapzter 1
62 Christao17 : You realize that I wasn't describing how fares are currently set up, but how they could be set up in a system where there was a component of the fare
63 Mayor : Well, DL has always been a follower when it comes to air cargo, not a leader. I think that may be changing. In the past, the passenger end of the air
64 Pyrex : I am sorry, you cannot talk about fair and airline prices in the same sentence. The amount of price discrimination they do is already so rampant (sam
65 Post contains links Threepoint : I can assure you that this will not happen in Canada next year, or likely any year thereafter. The masses have been slumbering as most of the draconi
66 PanHAM : My airport is FRA and since on-line check in has becoma available, most frequent flyers use that method. May be the US is lagging behind in thnis, bi
67 Mayor : Exactly. I've got a good example of this and I hope it's a thing of the past. When I was still working DL cargo in SLC, one of our forwarders was mak
68 Threepoint : Thank you for your dissertation on the benefits of online check-in. I'd like to reply by saying: "I know". It's been commonplace for years, and it ce
69 Burkhard : I "proposed" to have this already during web booking - so you know if you have a fat convention or a fashion show weeks before. Just give the weight
70 AerorobNZ : That Beech 1900D crash at Charlotte was because of the weights not being specifically accurate to that flight and the real weight of the passengers as
71 NorthStarDC4M : Charlotte was NOT only due to overweight, but also due to an elevator cable tension mistake done a few days before by maintenance. Also, it was mostl
72 Art : Simple, isn't it? My very petite girlfriend would love it. She would travel with half a dozen suitcases if she did not have to pay extra. On second t
73 Pyrex : What? You say a lot of non-sense stuff in your post but this just takes the cake...
74 Burkhard : Thank you and continue dreaming of times that are gone forever...
75 AerorobNZ : Plane crashes are always a sequence of events. The point is that had they had the exact weights of passengers, and bags it wouldn't have stalled in t
76 NorthStarDC4M : Ok then i guess you're willing to submit to a strip search before boarding for "security" reasons And willing to submit for a DNA check to make sure
77 LH526 : Problem is the deviance between men and women ... "normal" females weigh 90-120 pound, men around 150-170 ... where to draw the line ... in that case
78 AerorobNZ : It's not medical information, it's information of mass, just like '500g' on the side of your breakfast cereal. It has no bearing on anything medical
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