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Slow Motion Close Up Landing Gear Videos  
User currently offlineJetMech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2687 posts, RR: 53
Posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 7046 times:

G'day Team,

I found these awesome videos on YouTube. They are slow motion videos of various commercial airliner landing gears as they progress through touch down and take off. The last three videos are good ones of the 747 and 777 landing gear retraction / extension sequence. Engineering at it's finest!



















Regards, JetMech


JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
17 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineKPDX From United States of America, joined Dec 2005, 2740 posts, RR: 2
Reply 1, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 7019 times:

Wow it is a small world. I just found these videos too and was enjoying them, then came on here to see this.  bigthumbsup 


View my aviation videos on Youtube by searching for zildjiandrummr12
User currently offlineJetMech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2687 posts, RR: 53
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 6978 times:



Quoting KPDX (Reply 1):

Yep, YouTube is getting better by the day! I noticed a few things watching those videos.

About 1 minute into the second video of the 777, it seems that the tyres on the forward axle of the bogie beam make contact with the tarmac just before the tyres on the centre axle. I remember reading somewhere, that 777 bogie beams are designed with a slight banana bend in them, with the lower ends of the banana at the forward and aft axle locations. This is apparently a design feature that balances loads upon all three axles for typical operating weights.

About 2:15 into the third video of the 747 is also interesting. If you look at the body gear bogie beam, you can see how rapidly it oscillates about the truck pivot as the wheels make contact with the tarmac.

Regards, JetMech



JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
User currently offlineSpeedbird2263 From Jamaica, joined Jul 2006, 470 posts, RR: 1
Reply 3, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 17 hours ago) and read 6838 times:



Quoting JetMech (Reply 2):
it seems that the tyres on the forward axle of the bogie beam make contact with the tarmac just before the tyres on the centre axle.

I noticed that as well. I've always wondered about that little detail regarding the triple 7's Main gear, I got thinking that If the entire bogie was "rigid" if you will or rather completely straight, then the bending moments must be incredible at touchdown. I wonder if that design was incorporated in the BLG for the A388  scratchchin 



Straight'n Up 'N Fly Right Son ;)
User currently offlineLazy8 From United States of America, joined Jun 2008, 41 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6776 times:



Quoting Speedbird2263 (Reply 3):
I noticed that as well. I've always wondered about that little detail regarding the triple 7's Main gear, I got thinking that If the entire bogie was "rigid" if you will or rather completely straight, then the bending moments must be incredible at touchdown

The rear axle on the T7 bogies also steer themselves though turns to reduce tire scrub. Similar to the fuselage mounted main gear on 747's.

Regards
Lazy8


User currently offlineGregarious119 From United States of America, joined Jun 2006, 532 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6757 times:

So here's my question:

Do the pilots have to brake after wheels-up to stop the rotation that they naturally have after rolling down the runway? Otherwise, the wheels would still be spinning as they ascend into the wheel bays...

Or is this process automated so the carriages automatically stop the wheels from spinning as they are stowed?


User currently offlineN14AZ From Germany, joined Feb 2007, 2699 posts, RR: 25
Reply 6, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6721 times:

Would be nice to see a Tu 154 touch down, just to compare with the B777.


View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Danny Versteegen
View Large View Medium
Click here for bigger photo!

Photo © Mischa Oordijk



Amazing that the Tupolev Engineers developed exactly the opposite solution. One should think that the physics were the same, even during the time when the developed the Tu 154.


User currently offlineIsitsafenow From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 4984 posts, RR: 23
Reply 7, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 6687 times:

JETMECH..........
I enjoyed that little show as did a couple of others here in the office.
They was amazed by how the gear works in the hanger pics.Like most people
on the planet, they have never seen that before because they, of course, are not airline people . Thx for sharing.


safe



If two people agree on EVERYTHING, then one isn't necessary.
User currently offlineJetMech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2687 posts, RR: 53
Reply 8, posted (6 years 1 month 3 weeks ago) and read 6446 times:



Quoting Isitsafenow (Reply 7):

No problem! Its great to be able to share the passion. Airplanes like many machines are fascinating devices. Each individual part is nothing but an unexciting and quite useless lump of metal (albeit an expensive one). Put all these parts together however and you have something else entirely  Smile ! Anyway, in keeping with the theme, here are some more videos. They need to be played at full volume for optimum effect Big grin !
















Regards, JetMech



JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
User currently offlinePW100 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2002, 2443 posts, RR: 12
Reply 9, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 13 hours ago) and read 6248 times:

Thanks JetMech. Awesome footage. I love those super slow motions!

You might like these as well, home made turbine powered jets. Build and flown by my brother, filmed by myself!











FCO2-Test-F15 - Hosted by Putfile.com









F16-Demo-Gerald-Rutten -

Immigration officer: "What's the purpose of your visit to the USA?" Spotter: "Shooting airliners with my Canon!"
User currently offlineJetMech From Australia, joined Mar 2006, 2687 posts, RR: 53
Reply 10, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 6 hours ago) and read 6120 times:



Quoting PW100 (Reply 9):
You might like these as well, home made turbine powered jets. Build and flown by my brother, filmed by myself!

Now that is impressive! Scratch built models are always the most awesome. I see that you have scale landing gear, engine nozzles and cockpit! I am also very impressed by your brothers flying skills. What I have seen with many models is that due to scale effect, the flight dynamics of models tends to be much too quick and jerky compared with the real item. Your brothers flight skills are impressive, as he seems to be able to fly the aircraft in a very realistic manner.

What sort of radio set-up do you have? I saw that you were running elevons on your model, so I presume you have a radio that provides electronic mixing. Are you running the rudders and nose wheel steering off the single channel / servo? What scale did you build to? I calculate it to be around 11.3%.

Is that your F-16 as well? I like the colour scheme! That ECAM readout was interesting. I saw a peak EGT of about 650 Celsius, and an idle speed of what I assume was about 124,500 RPM. Again, the flying dynamics of the F-16 were impressive as they really did mimic the full size aeroplane.

Hopefully, I will find time in future to indulge in some large-scale modelling myself. For many years I have wanted to build a large scale sailplane, such as a Salto H-101, or something classic such as a Minimoa or PWS-101.

Anyway, thanks for those wonderful videos. I am most impressed  Smile .

Regards, JetMech



JetMech split the back of his pants. He can feel the wind in his hair.
User currently offline474218 From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 6340 posts, RR: 9
Reply 11, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 6060 times:



Quoting Isitsafenow (Reply 7):
I enjoyed that little show as did a couple of others here in the office.
They was amazed by how the gear works in the hanger pics.Like most people
on the planet, they have never seen that before because they, of course, are not airline people . Thx for sharing.

What some people take for granted others fine unique. We had to have a new fire alarm system installed in our office, which required cutting several holes in the walls. When it came time to patch the walls there were half a dozen aircraft engineers standing around watching a guy apply plaster. We were amazed at his skill, slap it on and smooth it out in just seconds.


User currently offlineFlyboyOz From Australia, joined Nov 2000, 1985 posts, RR: 25
Reply 12, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 5 hours ago) and read 6006 times:

great videos!

Landing - very interesting to see smoking coming out from the wheels
Take off - boring...nothing special lol



The Spirit of AustraliAN - Longreach
User currently offlineRwessel From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 2345 posts, RR: 2
Reply 13, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 6 days 2 hours ago) and read 5895 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting PW100 (Reply 9):
You might like these as well, home made turbine powered jets. Build and flown by my brother, filmed by myself!

Very impressive. Out of curiosity, are the turbines your own (or your brother’s) design, or are they derived from Kurt Schreckling’s designs?


User currently offlinePW100 From Netherlands, joined Jan 2002, 2443 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 18 hours ago) and read 5632 times:



Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
Your brothers flight skills are impressive, as he seems to be able to fly the aircraft in a very realistic manner

Thank you for the nice words!
He likes to fly the airplane [in fact, all his model airplanes] in such a way to duplicate the real thing as best as possible. Indeed, he's quite good in doing just that! BTW He is currently participating in the world championships of scale modle building and flying in Poland [FAI class F4C]:

He also build his models himself, some scratch build, some in half-kit. I am not involved [anymore . . . ] with model building and flying, I limit myself to photo and video.

Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
What sort of radio set-up do you have

It´s Futaba gear, though I don´t have the exact modelnr.

Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
I saw that you were running elevons on your model, so I presume you have a radio that provides electronic mixing

Correct! The aircraft does not have ailerons, it´s fully controlled through the elevons!

Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
Are you running the rudders and nose wheel steering off the single channel / servo?

Yes. smart internal linking makes this possible. You may have noted on the on-board view that both rudders on the F-15 deflected around 35 deg, during runway line-up for take-off, as the nosewheel steering lined up the aircraft.

Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
What scale did you build to? I calculate it to be around 11.3%.

F-15:
Length: 220 cm
Span: 145 cm
Weight: 9.5 kg
Speed 300 km/h

Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
Is that your F-16 as well

Well, my brother's, yes!
F-16:
Length: 210 cm
Span: 134 cm
Weight: 9.5 Kg
Speed: 360 km/h

Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
. . . and an idle speed of what I assume was about 124,500 RPM

Idle speed is around 55.000 rpm, Max power is set in the ECU at 126,000 rpm.

Here's his website with more information on his models:
http://www.putfile.com/geraldrutten

Some photo's I took of his models in action:


http://img2.putfile.com/main/7/20008130385.jpg






Homebuilt and self-designed NLG [as well as MLG]

Quoting Rwessel (Reply 13):
. . . are the turbines your own (or your brother’s) design, or are they derived from Kurt Schreckling’s designs?

The design is based on Mr. Schreckling's KJ-66, some modifications have been done to several parts of the engine, most noticably the diffuser.




http://www.putfile.com/geraldrutten

Best Regards,
PW100



Immigration officer: "What's the purpose of your visit to the USA?" Spotter: "Shooting airliners with my Canon!"
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 15, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5514 times:



Quoting JetMech (Reply 10):
Now that is impressive! Scratch built models are always the most awesome.

While checking out the videos related to that fantastic F-15, I found this:


My flabber is gasted. I have no idea how this is possible without stability augmentation.

Tom.


User currently offlineDocLightning From United States of America, joined Nov 2005, 19552 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 12 hours ago) and read 5486 times:



Quoting JetMech (Reply 2):
I remember reading somewhere, that 777 bogie beams are designed with a slight banana bend in them, with the lower ends of the banana at the forward and aft axle locations. This is apparently a design feature that balances loads upon all three axles for typical operating weights.

Well that makes sense. It's sort of like pre-stressing concrete. It would remove some pressure off the center wheels and distribute it to the forward and rear axles, too. Just like you said. The other option would have been to branch the support beam into three, but that would have been more complex and much heavier. The banana-bend is far a more elegant solution to the problem.


User currently offlineSpeedbird2263 From Jamaica, joined Jul 2006, 470 posts, RR: 1
Reply 17, posted (6 years 1 month 2 weeks 3 days 11 hours ago) and read 5419 times:



Quoting DocLightning (Reply 16):
Well that makes sense. It's sort of like pre-stressing concrete. It would remove some pressure off the center wheels and distribute it to the forward and rear axles, too. Just like you said. The other option would have been to branch the support beam into three, but that would have been more complex and much heavier. The banana-bend is far a more elegant solution to the problem.

Thank you for that bit of explanation as all this time that's what I've been trying to get my mind wrapped around. I understand exactly now what the benefits would be of the 'banana-bend', Id only naturally assume that the A380 incorporates such a design as well on its BLG.

 scratchchin 



Straight'n Up 'N Fly Right Son ;)
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