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Biometric Fingerprint Boarding  
User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26905 posts, RR: 58
Posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3320 times:

A friend of mine who works in a company dealing with biometric data processing told me that a company in Germany are trialing a system where passengers would check in and place their finger on a scanner and that this would be used instead of a boarding cards at security and boarding gate control posts.

Does anyone think this will really catch on and be the norm in say 10 years time?? What are the possible down sides of this system?

71 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25054 posts, RR: 46
Reply 1, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 20 hours ago) and read 3316 times:

SAS has been pursuing biometrics for two years now, with such measures being used on domestic Swedish flights quite successfully.

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_pwwi/is_200611/ai_n16854902
http://www.asiatraveltips.com/news06/286-Biometrics.shtml



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineAznMadSci From United States of America, joined Dec 2007, 3661 posts, RR: 5
Reply 2, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3290 times:

Wasn't T5 supposed to have some sort of biometric type of boarding procedure in place to differentiate between international and domestic passengers and preventing those to switch boarding passes in the sterile common area?


The journey of life is not based on the accomplishments, but the experience.
User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3279 times:

Fingerprinting is for criminals and not for normal passengers. This should be outlawed in civilized countries.

User currently offlineOlle From Sweden, joined Feb 2007, 280 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3276 times:

The idea is to verify that it is the same person who has checked in bags etc that is actually on that airplane.

User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3263 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 3):
Fingerprinting is for criminals

Actually, that's quite incorrect. A person can/will certainly be fingerprinted if charged with a possible crime. However, he/she still needs to be found guilty of that crime before being officially classed as a criminal. Fingerprinting has also been a requirement for permanent residency in many "civilised countries", yet those individuals are neither "criminals" nor classed as such.


User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 6, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3242 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 5):
Actually, that's quite incorrect. A person can/will certainly be fingerprinted if charged with a possible crime. However, he/she still needs to be found guilty of that crime before being officially classed as a criminal.

All right, then it is for criminals and criminal suspects.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 5):
Fingerprinting has also been a requirement for permanent residency in many "civilised countries", yet those individuals are neither "criminals" nor classed as such.

All disguised police states.


User currently offlineDL767captain From United States of America, joined Mar 2007, 2539 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3243 times:

This would be great for more than just boarding passes. But the problem is that there needs to be some master record with everyone's fingerprint on file that the airlines can access. I've heard before that this is the reason biometrics haven't really caught on. They are afraid that the company that held all the data would be able to charge just about anything for companies to access that data (sort of like how companies pay a certain % when you use a credit card) and that they don't want one company to have all that power. To me it would be pretty easy to just allow the government to handle that.

This would be a whole lot easier than carrying around a bunch of paper.


User currently offlineSomeone83 From Norway, joined Sep 2006, 3358 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3235 times:



Quoting LAXintl (Reply 1):
SAS has been pursuing biometrics for two years now, with such measures being used on domestic Swedish flights quite successfully.

It has also been implemented on domestic Norwegian flights


User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3220 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 6):
All right, then it is for criminals and criminal suspects.

That's perfectly fine, and I was only pointing out that is not what you continually, and repeatedly, state.

Quoting Thorben (Reply 6):
All disguised police states.

Absolute and unadulterated nonsense, but if that's your rather limited outlook then so be it.

Quoting DL767captain (Reply 7):
This would be great for more than just boarding passes. But the problem is that there needs to be some master record with everyone's fingerprint on file that the airlines can access.



Quoting DL767captain (Reply 7):
This would be great for more than just boarding passes. But the problem is that there needs to be some master record with everyone's fingerprint on file that the airlines can access. I've heard before that this is the reason biometrics haven't really caught on.

Absolutely not....and that's one thing I would certainly agree with Thorben (or anyone else) on! I have no objection to such fingerprinting if used for a specific and identifiable reason and then destroyed when no longer applicable. However, certainly not for general use in any database.

Quoting DL767captain (Reply 7):
To me it would be pretty easy to just allow the government to handle that.

Isn't that what your own govt are doing, and which is the sole reason for so many objections to it......no-one knows what it is actually being used for, for how long is it being kept, or who has access to it? Indeed, a very valid objection is if someone has no criminal record anywhere, then it can't be correlated to anything and should thus be destroyed. If I may say so, if US citizens were subject to it there would be an absolute howl of objections.


User currently offlineXtoler From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 19 hours ago) and read 3207 times:

I had to be fingerprinted when I enlisted in the USAF, and then when I was a civilian with the Department of Defense, and later as a flight attendant. Fingerprinting, it's not just for criminals. Even scarier, was talk about DNA testing all of our US Military. Just goes to show you, we're all treated as guilty before a crime could even be concieved. Seriously, though, for security reasons, I have to agree with fingerprinting and DNA testing.


EMB145 F/A, F/E, J41 F/A, F/E, because my wife clipped my wings, armchair captain
User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3200 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 9):
That's perfectly fine, and I was only pointing out that is not what you continually, and repeatedly, state.

I take the short version.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 9):
Absolute and unadulterated nonsense, but if that's your rather limited outlook then so be it.

Really? How many surveillance cameras are there in the UK? Completely nuts surveillance society, still a very criminal country with successful terrorist attacks.

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 10):

Interesting career, but if that is the land of the free, than farewell freedom.


User currently offlineGsosbee From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 825 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3185 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 3):
Fingerprinting is for criminals and not for normal passengers. This should be outlawed in civilized countries.

Just the opposite - the quicker this can become the standard, some of the other security measures can be changed which should speed up the entire process.


User currently offlineHomaDreaming From United States of America, joined May 2008, 83 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3178 times:

Great idea, save the Trees, save the airlines some money, and almost no way around it when it comes to identifying people...Not to mention I will never end up loosing my boarding pass again! Ouch

Heres the problem,

some similar technology is used in Super markets and I even encountered them in tanning salons here in the US! I cant imagine the governments letting this information just be used to identify the same person gets on board...They will probably demand to collect the data and before you know it, every where you go and what ever you do or buy, your being finger printed in the name of national security. The right to privacy is an implied and natural right in the civilized world...before you know it, they are selling the information to some company to market things to you as well as watch what you do...Kind of like some of those social networking websites but much more extensive...

The only way it will work is if there are strict guidelines on how this information is used and privacy protection laws...as well as certain protections for Airlines, that they will not be forced to hand information over to some Government agency/company without knowing why, and somehow end up looking like the bad guy in the media...

Quoting Thorben (Reply 6):

All disguised police states.

sadly, I agree...


User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 14, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3173 times:



Quoting Gsosbee (Reply 12):

Just the opposite - the quicker this can become the standard, some of the other security measures can be changed which should speed up the entire process.

Which measures could be dropped for that? And if there are any, I think I would not give the fingerprints for a faster "entire process".


User currently offlineXtoler From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3165 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 11):
Interesting career, but if that is the land of the free, than farewell freedom.

Funny you mention that, because I felt a more free as a DoD civilian in Germany, than I did once I came back home to the states. I hate to sound un-American but it seems everyday our rights are beeing taken away (no smoking, no trans-fats, etc.) by people I haven't voted for, but think they know what's good for me. I'm not planning on renouncing my American citezenship anytime soon, but my wife and I are really looking at Costa Rica as an ideal place to live. Well, maybe once we are of retirement age and we live off our kids. Granted, my wife and I had less rights while active duty military, but the regulations made sense. Now that we've both been out for 15 years, seems like we have less rights now as civilians than when we were just airmen. Then again, as our right we get involved and vote. Sometimes we win, sometimes we don't. Can't blame us for lack of trying though.



EMB145 F/A, F/E, J41 F/A, F/E, because my wife clipped my wings, armchair captain
User currently offlineLAXintl From United States of America, joined May 2000, 25054 posts, RR: 46
Reply 16, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3158 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 6):
All right, then it is for criminals and criminal suspects.

Finger printing is a lot more then just for criminals and criminal suspects.

For instance a whole host of jobs require finger printing many part of back ground checks, from teachers, to medical and bank staff to airport workers.

Personally I have no issues with airlines or airports looking at biometrics as part of both an added security layer and also part of cost savings/efficiency gains.



From the desert to the sea, to all of Southern California
User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 17, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3148 times:



Quoting Xtoler (Reply 15):
Funny you mention that, because I felt a more free as a DoD civilian in Germany, than I did once I came back home to the states.

When I spent a year in the US, it seemed like a more authoritarian country than Germany to me. Rules everywhere and a lot of punishments for not following them. TV looked like in a Middle Eastern dictatorship, bad words peeped out, boobs etc. not shown.

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 15):
I hate to sound un-American

Depends on what you consider to be un-American. Is it un-American to criticize, or is it un-American to stay quiet when the government takes away rights? 80% of the US citizens think their country is going in a wrong direction. Maybe the government is un-American, not its critics.

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 15):
it seems everyday our rights are beeing taken away (no smoking, no trans-fats, etc.) by people I haven't voted for, but think they know what's good for me.

Sounds like the EU bureaucrats, except that nobody voted for them.


User currently offlineXtoler From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 953 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3139 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 14):
Which measures could be dropped for that? And if there are any, I think I would not give the fingerprints for a faster "entire process".

Maybe those "random" extra searches by TSA on the way to the gate? More streamlined security? Of course I'm just talking the states. The only other country I've been too since I came back from Germany was Canada a few times. But when I lived in Europe, it seemed a lot easier going through customs than it did in the states (except for the first time I flew to Madrid). Then again all this was between '90 to '98.



EMB145 F/A, F/E, J41 F/A, F/E, because my wife clipped my wings, armchair captain
User currently offlineTXJim From United States of America, joined May 2008, 241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 19, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3133 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 3):
Fingerprinting is for criminals and not for normal passengers. This should be outlawed in civilized countries.

This is one of many examples where low-cost technology is can be a useful time saver but misused as well. Biometrics, RFID and other technologies that have become more accessible are very useful for building access, PC security and, if properly used, a very simple way to make sure that the same passenger who checked in is the one boarding the aircraft. Like many other such techniques and technologies in the past, it is ripe for misuse and worthy of some level of concern.

In my opinion, it's useless to suppress technology over concerns of misuse as useful technology will ultimately prevail. The music industry tried for years to suppress file sharing and retain the legacy methods of music distribution. Their efforts failed just like resistance to biometrics will ultimately fail. The best thing we can do is assure effective guidelines in place. (no, I have no idea how to do this!)

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 10):
Even scarier, was talk about DNA testing all of our US Military

Yes, DNA collection on a global basis scares me as well but for a different reason. It's not so much that I believe that my DNA profile on file will falsely implicate me in a crime (although I believe use of such evidence should be in the hands of a Judge) but because an insurance company might deny coverage due to a genetic disposition to heart disease or a prospective employer notes a genetic marker indicating I read this forum too much!


User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 20, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 18 hours ago) and read 3119 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 11):
Really? How many surveillance cameras are there in the UK? Completely nuts surveillance society, still a very criminal country with successful terrorist attacks.

Ahem! are you saying Germany isn't a criminal country? Excuse me, but you are now commenting on different thinks, and please enlighten me as to what speed camera's have to do with what you're supposedly talking about, other than trying to continually 'enlarge' your argument? I pointed out that fingerprinting is not limited to criminals, which you repeatedly adhere to, and explained that it has long been used for example as a requirement for those seeking permanent residency in a foreign country. You stated such "civilised countries" are "disguised police states".
Can you please explain to me exactly what you are talking about, or how many countries are "disguised police states" simply because you seem to dislike certain things. Whilst certainly not prying, or being personal,I am starting to wonder the real reason for your hatred of fingerprinting. As I've stated before, I will agree with you in some respects regarding erosion of certain liberties without due reason, but you seem to be taking such way to far. Just an observation, and I could well indeed be incorrect.


User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 21, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 3105 times:



Quoting LAXintl (Reply 16):
Finger printing is a lot more then just for criminals and criminal suspects.

It should be limited to those, but it is done far more often. In those discussions I see how widespread it is in the US, it is not that bad over here. Partial reason might be that you have neither ID cards nor registration offices.

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 18):
Maybe those "random" extra searches by TSA on the way to the gate?

Random searches? I've never seen something like that and I disagree with it. One should be checked one time, and when you're OK, you should not be checked again.

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 18):
Of course I'm just talking the states.

Sorry, I have the more European perspective.

Quoting Xtoler (Reply 18):
Then again all this was between '90 to '98.

I've been to the US five times between 1994 and March/April 2001. Those were better times, no 9/11, no paranoia.

Quoting TXJim (Reply 19):
This is one of many examples where low-cost technology is can be a useful time saver but misused as well.

Indeed.

Quoting TXJim (Reply 19):
a very simple way to make sure that the same passenger who checked in is the one boarding the aircraft.

Over here you show your boarding card (which has the name on it) and your ID before you enter the aircraft, and everything is fine.


User currently offlineOA260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 26905 posts, RR: 58
Reply 22, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 3083 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 11):
How many surveillance cameras are there in the UK? Completely nuts surveillance society, still a very criminal country with successful terrorist attacks.

Well unfortunately the UK needs surveillance cameras. For some reason there is an epidemic of social problems fueled by drink and gang violence. Its totally out of control. It seems to be a British pass time at present.


User currently offlineTXJim From United States of America, joined May 2008, 241 posts, RR: 0
Reply 23, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 3081 times:



Quoting Thorben (Reply 21):
Over here you show your boarding card (which has the name on it) and your ID before you enter the aircraft, and everything is fine.

Add the step where your boarding pass is confirmed (using a simple bar code or mag stripe reader) and we have the method that has been successful for many years. And, for a widebody, can require two or three gate agents to process the passengers. What if one gate agent can supervise two or three fingerprint readers without having to glance at IDs? Will this save the airline money? I am not defending the use of biometric readers, simply pointing out why it may be useful for the airport or airline.

I agree with your concerns (well, not so much with the Police State comment!) but technology will march on.


User currently offlineThorben From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 24, posted (6 years 1 month 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 3072 times:



Quoting AirNZ (Reply 20):
are you saying Germany isn't a criminal country?

The crime rate here is very low and has been getting lower for the last 18 years. However, I read an article recently about which capital in Europe has the highest crime rate. I didn't believe my eyes, it was Dublin followed by London. Two cities with endless masses of CCTV cameras.


Quoting AirNZ (Reply 20):
hat speed camera's have to do with what you're supposedly talking about,

Oh, those are speed cameras? They measure the speed of pedestrians? And I always thought those were surveillance cameras.

Honestly, how many of the 4 million + cameras in the UK are for speed surveillance?

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 20):
I pointed out that fingerprinting is not limited to criminals, which you repeatedly adhere to, and explained that it has long been used for example as a requirement for those seeking permanent residency in a foreign country.

OK, maybe I should make it more clearly: "In my humble opinion, fingerprinting should be limited to criminals and criminal suspects, and every other use should be outlawed, because fingerprinting for every other reason, in my humble opinion, is not appropriate, humiliates people, and collects data that may be used against privacy rights, without there being a good enough justification for it."

I have no ambition to write long phrases like this all the time, that is why I make it shorter.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 20):
ou stated such "civilised countries" are "disguised police states".
Can you please explain to me exactly what you are talking about, or how many countries are "disguised police states" simply because you seem to dislike certain things.

USA, UK, Ireland, UAE (not really disguised), Russia, Germany (applicant), and probably a couple more.

Quoting AirNZ (Reply 20):
Whilst certainly not prying, or being personal,I am starting to wonder the real reason for your hatred of fingerprinting.

It is a lot more than fingerprinting that I dislike. And for the personal aspect: You don't know me in person, so we should leave that out.


Quoting AirNZ (Reply 20):
As I've stated before, I will agree with you in some respects regarding erosion of certain liberties without due reason, but you seem to be taking such way to far. Just an observation, and I could well indeed be incorrect.

I care more about civil liberties than most other people I know, but I read more about the erosions, so probably have more reasons to think that something is going wrong.


25 OA260 : Do you have a source for that ? Also what crime statistics were involved? Its certainly not a policed state. Germany is thats for sure. Is it not com
26 AirNZ : You are correct, and I apologise for my error. I thought you said speed camera's. No-one is expecting you to write it each time. However, you have fi
27 Bond007 : Ah, this is the way boarding should be done, and I have absolutely no problem with it! The bottom line is that 'the government' can find out most thin
28 Post contains links Thorben : The question is: Are the cameras needed because people get drunk, or do people get drunk because of being surveilled all the time. In the 80s and 90s
29 Gsosbee : I didn't say dropped, I said changed. For example, a "shot" before entering the security line would allow the current two screenings through security
30 OA260 : This must be a Grey area then as two years ago in Frankfurt me and a few friends were over for a few days and one night walking back to the hotel we
31 2175301 : Fingerprinting is required both for anyone arrested for any crime - and for any persone seeking employment where some level of security is required (t
32 DL767captain : But who cares what it's being used for. The only people that care should maybe be investigated because the only reason you would care if the govt has
33 AirNZ : Yes, I certainly agree with most of what you are saying, but the above is a very substantial and contentious issue. In such respect you are then, by
34 Enginebird : Come on, good ole "if you've got nothing to hide you shouldn't care" That's the oldest and at the same time weakest (pseudo-) justification for takin
35 DL767captain : But why do you have a problem with someone hearing you talk about what groceries to get? No one even listens, they have software that listens for cer
36 Bond007 : I agree completely! Actually IMO it's total justification. That just happens to be your opinion. What civil liberties exactly, are being taken away?
37 Enginebird : Well, that just happens to be your opinion then. QED. Where does that leave us? I just made a point that the "if you've got nothing to hide you shoul
38 Olle : My experience from working in the ID industry is that the acceptance is very different in different countries. In Sweden we have got high security doc
39 Enginebird : Among other things, yes. Some basic rights were implemented for a reason and the argument that you shouldn't care if you have got nothing to hide is
40 Bond007 : I replied because your comment was made as 'matter of fact', opinion. Well, nobody here said it could be used to take away ANY 'given civil liberty'
41 DL767captain : In all honesty no you shouldn't. Once again they have software that listens for specific words or phrases then flags that conversation for review. Th
42 Bond007 : I'm trying to express my opinions without being condescending, I suggest you might try also. But again, sure it can, but I'm not suggesting it CAN be
43 AirNZ : I'm sorry, but that is a totally preposterous comment and nothing but unadulterated nonsense! Are you seriously saying that the average person should
44 DL767captain : Honestly no i wouldn't care if they recorded my home conversations because i have nothing to hide. What do i care if they hear what my movie plans ar
45 Bond007 : In the context of this thread it is not. Sure, I'm not worried about biometric checks since I am not a criminal. I'm telling you I am not suggesting
46 Aa757first : But they're for a clear reason. Those people are working around children, lots of money, operating aircraft, have access to sterile areas and/or drug
47 Enginebird : Welcome to my respected members list. Are you serious? You can't be, sorry. 24/7 trackability by the government and who knows who else? -- With all d
48 TXJim : Actually, the equipment is very inexpensive. Much cheaper than the mag stripe readers that used to be the norm and slightly cheaper than the bar code
49 DL767captain : They don't track you all the time, only when they have a reason for it. 1) who cares if they track you going to the super market? They wouldn't anywa
50 AirNZ : Firstly, thanks indeed for your informative answers and I do appreciate good and proper discussion. No, I don't think anyone is 'freaking out about i
51 Luv2cattlecall : Soo.....Disney/other theme parks are prisons? Or what are you getting at...because some of them go all out and take a full hand print to make sure yo
52 AirNZ : Indeed, you are quite correct that it is not in the context of this threads. However, I clearly stated "in the context of liberties", and the fundame
53 Bingo : I'm with you....the next thing to follow should be removing photographs from Identification Cards like Passports. Everytime someone takes my photogra
54 DL767captain : The only thing i can really think the government would actually use your fingerprint in a database is during a criminal investigation, when looking t
55 Analog : It eliminates customers that don't have unique fingerprints (skin condition, no hands, etc.)? In the US this might be a violation of the the Air Carr
56 Enginebird : Sorry to say, but this view is certainly very naive. You do not have to plan/do anything illegal and a lot of people may still have a good reason for
57 DL767captain : And why shouldn't defense contractors be watched carefully? They handle very sensitive material and it wouldn't be hard for someone to take advantage
58 Thorben : They are not full police states like North Korea or Syria, but they all have a tendency of going into the direction, that's why I said "police states
59 Thorben : I don't think this pays off financially, unless the biometrics industry subsidizes it in order to use it as a promotion. If somebody wanted to scan m
60 LAXintl : Benefit of biometrics are multiple. From simple fraud prevention, to security by being able to positively identify some one. Biometrics is safer then
61 Xtoler : Wow, this thread is still going! It's really going! I like to read Tom Clancey, and right now I'm reading a Robert Ludlum at the moment (talk about co
62 DK001 : You go to check in and get fingerprinted, go through security and into departure's and the flight is called go to your gate and get fingerprinted agai
63 Beaucaire : It's time to wake up and stop all that nonsense! Biometric check-in,fingerprint passport-control,police-photograph security registrations -next years
64 Analog : Biometrics cannot be revoked. They may be more secure than passwords, but the consequences of someone else stealing it are far worse. Fingerprints ca
65 CXfirst : In Norway, they assured the public that all fingerprints would be used for comparisons between the individual that checked-in and the individual that
66 Crewchief : I believe Dr. Denning addressed this years ago in suggesting a "liveness test". If the biometric is live, it isn't copied. If it's not alive, it coul
67 Analog : Security can be based on: - Something you have - Something you know - Something you are Using only one is foolish. This can be defeated. I has been fo
68 LAXintl : So well known they are amazingly easy to forge. You would not believe the number of occasions altered boarding passes are used by folks claiming cred
69 Crewchief : So we agree that the ID-only used today is foolish, and that using biometric + ID is better? But the issue is not whether it can be defeated -- given
70 Analog : I think using ID at all for passengers (at least for domestic flights) is foolish. It would be a simple to make one-time-use boarding passes with uni
71 Fyano773 : My brother was in EWR and IAH and officials scanned his fingerprint and took a photo in both. I was wondering if the corresponding databases (where t
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