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Last RB211 Delivered  
User currently offlinePM From India, joined Feb 2005, 6841 posts, RR: 64
Posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 14254 times:

"Cargolux Airlines International took delivery of its 16th and final 747-400F powered by Rolls-Royce RB211-524H-Ts. "

http://www.atwonline.com/news/other.html?issueDate=7%2F22%2F2008

There are those who argue that the RB211 didn't die, it turned into the Trent, but the last engines marketed as RB211s have been built and delivered. For those of us who can remember its birth, that's amazing.

Me, I've flown on TriStars, 747s, 757s and 767s powered by RB211s. A cool engine!

57 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineCX flyboy From Hong Kong, joined Dec 1999, 6535 posts, RR: 55
Reply 1, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 14206 times:

Are you saying there will be no new engines built even as spare parts purchased by airlines?

User currently offlineDeltaL1011man From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 9088 posts, RR: 12
Reply 2, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14187 times:

Long live the RB211s!! You will be missed!  cry 
My first ever trip with a RB211 was on a Delta L1011 (N728DA) ATL-MCO will never forget the sound/smell of the Rolls starting up in Atlanta that morning.



yep.
User currently offlineViasa From Switzerland, joined Jun 2005, 1853 posts, RR: 7
Reply 3, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14192 times:

Here is also a report about the 16th B744 of Cargolux: http://news.tageblatt.lu/news/126/ARTICLE/1456/2008-07-21.html (in german only)

User currently offlinePM From India, joined Feb 2005, 6841 posts, RR: 64
Reply 4, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14117 times:



Quoting CX flyboy (Reply 1):
Are you saying there will be no new engines built even as spare parts purchased by airlines?

I have no idea. I'm sure RR will continue to make bits of an RB211 but it seems unlikely they'd assemble a whole engine just to use as spares. The point surely is that this 747 is the last RB211-powered plane to be delivered. Sad.


User currently offlineScbriml From United Kingdom, joined Jul 2003, 12050 posts, RR: 47
Reply 5, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 17 hours ago) and read 14027 times:
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I assume the remaining dozen os so 744Fs to be delivered are all GE or PW powered? What were those airlines thinking?  wink 


Hey AA, the 1960s called. They want their planes back!
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 6, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 13967 times:



Quoting PM (Thread starter):
There are those who argue that the RB211 didn't die, it turned into the Trent, but the last engines marketed as RB211s have been built and delivered.

They will still build RB211's.

Quoting PM (Reply 4):
I'm sure RR will continue to make bits of an RB211 but it seems unlikely they'd assemble a whole engine just to use as spares.

You need whole engines as spares...engine maintenance takes *way* too long to be done on wing. You just change engines and move on. As long as RB211's are flying their life-limited-parts will run out of life and a spare engine will be waiting in the wings to take its place.

Tom.


User currently offlineKogge From Germany, joined Nov 2007, 74 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 16 hours ago) and read 13896 times:

PM, do you know how many RB211 they have delivered to Russia for the Scirocco Tupolev Tu-204 project ?
China ordered some Tu204 with RB211, and one of them is existing in Air China colours since several years, but has still not been delivered. For the rest only a few fuselages are existing as far as I know.
If no more RB211 are produced then the probability that more Tu204 will go to China is very small...



Flown in Caravelle, Coronado, Friendship, Fellowship, Herald, Heron, One-Eleven, Trident, Viscount & others
User currently offlineAndrewtang From United Kingdom, joined Jun 2001, 461 posts, RR: 10
Reply 8, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 13 hours ago) and read 13636 times:

Haha. But the full technical name of Trent engines are still RB211.
Example RB211-Trent 772-60B.

So with this last delivery, it only ends the era of RB211-524H/T on a brand new 744 delivery.  Smile


User currently offlineNA From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10371 posts, RR: 11
Reply 9, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 13561 times:



Quoting Viasa (Reply 3):
Here is also a report about the 16th B744 of Cargolux: http://news.tageblatt.lu/news/126/ARTICLE/1456/2008-07-21.html (in german only)

Thanks for posting. This article also mentions that the construction of the very last 747-400 is beginning this week. A success story is going to end, almost 20 years after the first -400 was completed.


User currently offlineAirbusA6 From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 2004 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 13541 times:

I suppose theoretically someone could still order the 767 with the RB211 engine, though it's somewhat unlikely  Smile


it's the bus to stansted (now renamed national express a4 to ruin my username)
User currently offline757MDE From Colombia, joined Sep 2004, 1753 posts, RR: 6
Reply 11, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 13452 times:

I'd also be interested in knowing what'd happen with the Tu-204 then... only PS-90 now?


I gladly accept donations to pay for flight hours! This thing draws man...
User currently offlineAndz From South Africa, joined Feb 2004, 8416 posts, RR: 11
Reply 12, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 11 hours ago) and read 13392 times:
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I flew JNB-LHR on the first 747 ever fitted with RB-211s in 1977. It belonged to British Airways and on a bulkhead was a plaque proclaiming that the aircraft held the record for the heaviest ever takeoff by a civil aircraft.


After Monday and Tuesday even the calendar says WTF...
User currently offlineWestWing From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2125 posts, RR: 7
Reply 13, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 13266 times:



Quoting NA (Reply 9):
This article also mentions that the construction of the very last 747-400 is beginning this week.

Can someone elaborate on this? When I last visited the 747 assembly line (many years ago), it seemed there were five assembly positions. Now there are about ten undelivered 744s, which are being produced at about one per month. So I don't understand how assembly of the final 744 would be so close.

Completely off topic (but related to the German link that was posted): I was mildly amused by how google translate tools translated "Chefingenieurin" into English. I have no doubt the term really means Chief Engineer (female gender), but "the google" thinks otherwise.



The best time to plant a tree is 40 years ago. The second best time is today.
User currently offlineTeme82 From Finland, joined Mar 2007, 1401 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 10 hours ago) and read 13236 times:
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Quoting AirbusA6 (Reply 10):
I suppose theoretically someone could still order the 767 with the RB211 engine, though it's somewhat unlikely

What operators are using RB211 on their 767's?



Flying high and low
User currently offlineAirbusA6 From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2005, 2004 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 13190 times:



Quoting Teme82 (Reply 14):
What operators are using RB211 on their 767's?

BA, QANTAS (using BA birds) and one Chinese carrier has 2 or 3



it's the bus to stansted (now renamed national express a4 to ruin my username)
User currently offlineNA From Germany, joined Dec 1999, 10371 posts, RR: 11
Reply 16, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 13170 times:



Quoting WestWing (Reply 13):
Can someone elaborate on this? When I last visited the 747 assembly line (many years ago), it seemed there were five assembly positions. Now there are about ten undelivered 744s, which are being produced at about one per month. So I don't understand how assembly of the final 744 would be so close.

I guess you mean final assembly positions. Be sure that one or two of the last 10 744Fs are already finished and being painted or even testing.


User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 11962 posts, RR: 25
Reply 17, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 9 hours ago) and read 13140 times:



Quoting Tdscanuck (Reply 6):
You need whole engines as spares...engine maintenance takes *way* too long to be done on wing. You just change engines and move on. As long as RB211's are flying their life-limited-parts will run out of life and a spare engine will be waiting in the wings to take its place.

Yes, but won't these be rebuilds of old engines as opposed to new builds?

For instance, P&W says

Quote:
Although production ended in 1990, Pratt & Whitney continues to support the JT9D family. Upgrade programs are in place to enable operators to improve durability, increase thrust and reduce noise. With Pratt & Whitney's commitment to the JT9D program, these engines will continue to serve commercial aviation well into the 21st century.

So we know there are lots of JT9Ds flying around, but as one breaks (or falls off the wing and ends up in Lake Michigan  Smile) it is replaced by a rebuild, no?



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineBA319-131 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2001, 8430 posts, RR: 55
Reply 18, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 13039 times:
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Quoting AirbusA6 (Reply 15):
Quoting Teme82 (Reply 14):
What operators are using RB211 on their 767's?

BA, QANTAS (using BA birds) and one Chinese carrier has 2 or 3

- China Eastern



111,732,3,4,5,7,8,BBJ,741,742,743,744,752,762,763,764,772,773,77W,L15,D10,30,40,AB3,AB6,A312.313,319,320,321,332,333,342
User currently offlineRevelation From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 11962 posts, RR: 25
Reply 19, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 13008 times:



Quoting WestWing (Reply 13):
Can someone elaborate on this? When I last visited the 747 assembly line (many years ago), it seemed there were five assembly positions. Now there are about ten undelivered 744s, which are being produced at about one per month. So I don't understand how assembly of the final 744 would be so close.

Just because one pops out of the front of the building once a month, it doesn't mean it only takes one month to assemble. With five stations, it'd be five months from first to last station, no? And after it comes out, it needs to be painted and tested.



Inspiration, move me brightly!
User currently offlineBrendows From Norway, joined Apr 2006, 1020 posts, RR: 4
Reply 20, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 13000 times:



Quoting WestWing (Reply 13):
Can someone elaborate on this? When I last visited the 747 assembly line (many years ago), it seemed there were five assembly positions. Now there are about ten undelivered 744s, which are being produced at about one per month. So I don't understand how assembly of the final 744 would be so close.

They're assembling major 747 sections in the building next to the FAL, before they're moved to the FAL, and they're pushing out about 1 1/2 747 per month now.


User currently offlineShankly From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2000, 1529 posts, RR: 1
Reply 21, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 8 hours ago) and read 12850 times:

The RB-211 is one of those things that seems to have always been part of my life, albeit via my passion for aviation, as opposed to working with it

One thing has always intrigued me: Merlin, Griffon, Derwent, Dart, Conway, Spey etc etc. Great names for some great engines

Then the RB-211 appeared. If it turns out it was a Trent all along, why was it not called a Trent when it was first hung off the gorgeous Tristar in the early 70@s?



L1011 - P F M
User currently offlineVV701 From United Kingdom, joined Aug 2005, 7260 posts, RR: 17
Reply 22, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 12496 times:

RR are apparently still accepting orders for the RB211. Those placed recently are for use as gas compressors or power generation.

Here is an extract from RR's 2nd Quarter 2008 review that they published just two weeks ago on 7 July:

"RB211 Thai orders. Orders for three additional RB211 units, two for gas compression and one for power generation, were received for PTT Public Company Limited's gas separation plant project in northeast Thailand.

"More RB211s for Petrobras. Brazilian oil and gas company, Petrobras, is due to receive three Rolls-Royce RB211-G62 electrical generating sets for its new Caraguatatuba gas receiving and treatment station in the fourth quarter of this year.

"Additional RB211 for China pipeline. An additional gas compression package, scheduled to be operational by the end of 2009, increases the number of RB211 gas turbine compressor units on the China West-East Gas Pipeline Project to 16."

So if an exiting airline user required some new RB211s I assume that RR would be more than happy to add their order to the list of RB211s still to be delivered.


User currently offlineWestWing From United States of America, joined Feb 2005, 2125 posts, RR: 7
Reply 23, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 12391 times:



Quoting NA (Reply 16):
I guess you mean final assembly positions. Be sure that one or two of the last 10 744Fs are already finished and being painted or even testing.

Yes, I believe you are right it was five final assembly positions. However I believe at least ten 744s that have not yet rolled out (Five Cathay, Two UPS, Two NCA, Two LoadAir). The two NCA do not include the one that is out on the ramp right now.

Quoting Revelation (Reply 19):
Just because one pops out of the front of the building once a month, it doesn't mean it only takes one month to assemble. With five stations, it'd be five months from first to last station, no? And after it comes out, it needs to be painted and tested.

Sorry, my post was unclear. I did not intend to imply that it takes only one month to assemble. At the time of my visit, I seem to remember being that it took about eight weeks for assembly. This was the typical elapsed time from the start of the first Boeing factory work (which, IIRC, had to do with wing spars) to the time of roll-out from the assembly building . The eight weeks excluded the painting and test-time.

Quoting Brendows (Reply 20):
and they're pushing out about 1 1/2 747 per month now.

Even if the 744s are rolling out of the building at 1.5 per month, we must still be six months away from the last 744 rollout. So it is the six month assembly time for the last line number that seems much larger than the number that I remember. So either my memory of the eight weeks number is seriously flawed or it now indeed does take 5-6 months for assembly.



The best time to plant a tree is 40 years ago. The second best time is today.
User currently offlineBWilliams From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 212 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 9 months 1 week 5 hours ago) and read 10988 times:



Quoting VV701 (Reply 22):
RR are apparently still accepting orders for the RB211. Those placed recently are for use as gas compressors or power generation.

How do these work? Are these simply the core sections of the RB without the fan up front?



Regards, Brad Williams
25 Shankly : Now that will cause a few lumps in a few throats, mine included
26 Ptharris : What was the inspiration for those names anyways? Great marketing or something else?
27 YWG747 : Long live the RB211. They will be living for quite a while longer I will imagine. As there are tons used for natural gas and oil pipelines as well as
28 RJ111 : UK rivers, though i'm not sure about the first two on that list. The RB211 is quite simply my favourite engine. The noise she makes and the attractiv
29 Teme82 : Ok! Thanks... Looks like no more new RB211 for 767. I think the 747 is different story.
30 Post contains links and images JetMech : Pretty much. The MT30 is a modified version of the Trent which is used to provide propulsive power to ships. Apparently, it has 80% part commonality
31 413X3 : where was that video shot? looks like somewhere in India
32 KELPkid : So, does RB stand for "Runs backwards" (the engine rotates the opposite direction from GE and Pratt engines) or, as some American TriStar mechanics wo
33 YVRLTN : Birds of prey - one of their first engines (in widespread use anyway) was the Eagle almost 100 years ago now, then the Kestrel during the 20-30's, th
34 PM : I think it was just design #211, like, say, the BAe (HS) 146. The planned RR engine for the A300 was, I think, the RB206. I think I'm correct in sayi
35 WestWing : Perhaps in SI units - 47500 lbf thrust is approximately 211kN. [EDIT: Based on PM's detailed post just above - which he posted while I was typing min
36 Post contains links and images JetMech : The video of Wunala Dreaming? At the end of the video, the following appears, ""LPPT 20-04-2001" If LPPT is meant as an airport code, it represents L
37 YVRLTN : Thanks for the info PM!! Where did the Medway fit into this, wasnt this to be the original engine for the Trident? Did it turn into the RB211 or was
38 Post contains links Revelation : And the Nene was RB.41, with RB standing for Rolls Barnoldswick. From here: Barnoldswick was the place where Rover began productizing Frank Whittle's
39 BWilliams : " target=_blank>http://www.rolls-royce.com/marine/do...c.pdf Thanks a lot! Great information.
40 DJEmbraer : Except when some airline pipes up and says my aircraft won't fly if you don't build me an engine...
41 PM : It was indeed. But BEA - notoriously - demanded that the HS 121 design was scaled down and, I guess, the Medway proved too big. (Ironic, given the ne
42 Tdscanuck : Some will undoubtably be rebuilds, but I don't think the rebuilt supply is large enough yet to provide the full fleet needs (plus the non-aero applic
43 Archer : Delta 1011 Man My last flight was on N728DA the day they were retired in July 2001. It ran the last trip to MCO and back to ATL. Great airplane and en
44 PM : Was that the last ever Delta TriStar? Wow - I flew on '728' in December '98 SJU-ATL. That was my last TriStar flight too.
45 Post contains links and images JetMech : No worries! The LM6000 is a derivative of the aero CF6-80C2 that is also used to provide propulsive power to ships. The LM2500 is a popular propulsiv
46 Baroque : Let us all make wax effigies of the BEA board from then and stick pins in them! I suspect the Medway would have had more in common with the Conway th
47 PM : But one of the tragi-comic decisions of the two or three post-War decades that sealed the fate of the British aviation industry. TSR2 anyone?
48 Bongodog1964 : Rolls Royce piston engines were named after birds of prey; Kestel, Merlin, Griffon, Vulture etc The turbine engines have all been named after UK rive
49 PM : That'll teach them to break a successful tradition. Hence, back to rivers with the Trent! Has there ever been a RR Severn? A Thames? A Bann? An Aire?
50 StarGoldLHR : Given the glut of 767's coming onto the Market, and the start of the end of 747s/767s over the next few years... it's highly likely that when some of
51 KELPkid : Ironic, huh, especially considering that the RB211 was the #1 engine choice on the Boeing 757...
52 PM : It's a long story... Firstly, the -535 on the 757 and the -524 on the 747 (and 767) are quite different engines. RR got in as the launch engine on th
53 KELPkid : So, is it the same -524 sub-variant on the 747 and 767? Does that mean that the 747 and 767 engines were interchangeable? I could see where that woul
54 PM : Absolutely, and that was why BA wanted the -524 on the 767. They swap engines back and forth. Somebody more technically minded than I (posibly from w
55 Tdscanuck : There was nothing to 1) prevent you from maintaining your quad to ETOPS standards or 2) changing the engine maintenance program as it moved between a
56 DeltaL1011man : Lucky ass. I wanted to get on the flight but couldn't. So I sat at the airport and watched her go. I miss those planes and those Engines. I have a gr
57 Post contains links and images JetMech : Pretty much. At the time that the BA 767's were introduced to QF, and IIRC, the QF 744 RB-211 G2's were in the process of being upgraded to G2/H-T st
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