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Airline Compensation For Failure To Deliver  
User currently offlineBillReid From Netherlands, joined Jun 2006, 1021 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 12 hours ago) and read 3381 times:

Last Friday night DL176 from ATL to DUB had a broken aircraft. A Domestic B764 was subbed in without Business Class but with domestic first with a 32" pitch and limited recline.
The following day the Business Class PAX were not told before they had passed through the aircraft door and were aboard DL177 DUB-ATL. I realize the airlines have the right to freely substitute service, but after paying for a full C?

1. Should revenue PAX be compensated for the loss of service they had contracted for.
2. As a CO agent made up $1800 for three PAX not abiding the contract would CO give the pax compensation in cash out of the petty cash drawer if this happened to them? (See "I saved CO $1800 Today")

Basically, if a person pays for C class and the aircraft is not available should the Pax get something back outside of a Sorry?


Some people don't get it. Business is about making MONEY!
21 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineWowpeter From Hong Kong, joined Oct 2006, 156 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 3271 times:

Now that depends on the airlines... from what it seems like at DL, they are not giving anything away...

From what I heard from CX ground staff... if you get downgraded from F to C or C to EY due equipment change or overbook... you will get a free coupon for another F or C ticket for the route plus some form of cash compensation. Cash compensation depends on the port, but I have heard the cash compensation can be as much as a few thousands USD... So I think that's pretty fair, free ticket of the same class + cash compensation.

Now for the other extreme of the spectrum, you will have low cost carrier, who will tell you to pissed off if you get offloaded... although this is kinda different than downgrade, but you can't really downgrade on a low cost carrier can you?  Wink


User currently offlineORDflier From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 174 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3259 times:

At the very least DL should reimburse those customers whom paid a "Full-Business" Class fare with the fare difference between the full fare in Business and the full fare in Economy.
For those on upgrades, they should receive back either in terms of mileage or coupons.

Additionally, they should offer a coupon for a future upgrade to BusinessElite on their International services.

The customers should have been advised up front however. Boarding an aircraft only to find out then is unacceptable. Customers whom have paid full-fare for Business Class service should have been able to take an option to take their ticket over to another carrier if they chose.



ORDflier
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 3, posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 6 hours ago) and read 3222 times:



Quoting BillReid (Thread starter):
1. Should revenue PAX be compensated for the loss of service they had contracted for

The aircraft type and amenities are not [typically] a part of the contract, however class of service generally is.

Reading Delta's International General Rules (Contract of Carriage), it's unclear exactly which section would apply in your case, however, some potentialy relevent excerpts:

Rule 87 - Denied Boarding Compensation

Quote:
1. Conditions for Payment of Involuntary Denied Boarding Compensation
The passenger shall not be entitled to any compensation for involuntary denied boarding if:
[...]
b. Substitution of Equipment
The flight for which the passenger holds confirmed space is unable to accommodate that passenger because of substitution of equipment of lesser capacity when required by operational or safety reasons; [...]
c. Carriage in Alternative Cabin
Delta offers the accommodations, or seats the passenger in a section of the aircraft other than that specified on his/her ticket at no extra charge; provided however that if a passenger is seated in a section for which a lower fare applies, the passenger will be entitled to a refund of the difference in fare.

(you could also look at the provisions surrounding a scheule irregularity)


In the case of DL's Domestic General Rules, it's a little bit more explicit:

Rule 3 - Schedules and Operations

Quote:
Delta will use its best efforts to carry the passenger and baggage with reasonable dispatch. Times shown in timetables or elsewhere are not guaranteed and form no part of this contract. Delta may without notice substitute alternate carriers or aircraft, and may alter or omit stopping places shown on the ticket in case of necessity. Schedules are subject to change without notice. Delta is not responsible or liable for making connections, or for failing to operate any flight according to schedule, or for changing the schedule or any flight.

(emphasis mine)

I guess all I can say is write them a letter, see what happens; the International Conditions of Carriage leave a little room for negotiation, however I'm not sure which tariffs were applicable to your journey, nor am I familiar with all of the ins and outs, rules wise, of international travel.



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6204 posts, RR: 12
Reply 4, posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 5 hours ago) and read 3153 times:

Do I think you should be entitled to compensation? Absolutely.

Will Delta feel the same way? I seriously doubt it. They can call "business class" whatever they want; who says you're going to get a fully reclining seat just because you're in business class? (not that all DL's Biz-E seats are fully reclining yet anyway, but that's another issue). The airline can argue they seated you in your ticketed cabin, because after all, you were "up front", right? In fact, I wouldn't put it beyond them to claim you were "upgraded" to "First Class", if you pressed the issue. Sure, it's bogus, but that's the "full service" U.S. airlines for you.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 3):
The passenger shall not be entitled to any compensation for involuntary denied boarding if:
[...]
b. Substitution of Equipment
The flight for which the passenger holds confirmed space is unable to accommodate that passenger because of substitution of equipment of lesser capacity when required by operational or safety reasons; [...]

I wonder if anyone has challenged this particular provision in court. Basically, they're saying they can downgrade your flight to a smaller aircraft and truncate whomever they want (read: those of you nonelites on T or U fares) for any "operational" reason they want. "Operational" reason could be anything they want it to be (i.e. we could make more money by using the bigger equipment on a different route that day). The airline says it can deny you boarding and pay you squat.

Why don't they just simplify the CoC by saying, "You agree to pay the fare we demand, pay any fees we demand for any reason, and in return we may offer you air transportation (if we feel like it) to the destination on your ticket, if it makes financial sense for us to do so, subject to any rules and regulations we may from time to time make up and change at any time without notice. We don't guarantee your flight will get you to you destination any faster than the greyhound bus, in fact we don't guarantee anything, ever. You agree that we make the rules, we change the rules, and we may or may not enforce the rules. You agree that you shall not be entitled to compensation of any kind, expressed or implied, whenever delays and/or cancellations occur beyond the airlines control. Further, you also agree that we reserve the sole right to decide when a delay and/or cancellation is within our control or not. Reasons for delays/cancellations beyond our control include, but are not limited to: poor planning on our part resulting in an ATC delay at our major hubs, crew unavailability due to poor crew planning/scheduling, and maintenance issues for which no spare aircraft is available. In fact, you agree that we're so incompetent that no delays and/or cancellations of any kind are within our control, and we expressly decline liability for the same. If you're stuck in our hub overnight because you missed your connection due to our poor planning and the late arrival of your aircraft, you agree that we will claim the situation is beyond our control, food and lodging will be your responsibility, and we owe you nothing. You agree that in the case of overbooking, we may deny boarding to you even if you purchase your ticket first and check in first, if a customer who paid more for the seat we sold you is awaiting a seat assignment. If you are caught using any 'back to back' or 'hidden city' ticketing schemes (and you will be), you agree that your entire reservation is subject to cancellation without refund, and that we're entitled to re-sell your reserved seats in order to double-dip revenues on the same seat. We agree that we shall make available upon demand for inspection, this contract of carriage, in microprint which can be read by a special magnifying glass available for rent for $50. Whether or not we live up to our responsibilities outlined in this agreement, you agree that you have no rights whatsoever and any disputes are subject to resolution, by us, whose decision shall be final.



Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineBillReid From Netherlands, joined Jun 2006, 1021 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 4 hours ago) and read 3105 times:

Thanks for the answers. I have a great difficulty with DL telling a passenger oh well.
"Your contract cost you $8,550r/t and sorry the aircraft with the business class was broken. But we do have another nice plane that doesn't have C class. Go screw yourself!"

If a pax contracts for C class and pays for it, then if the airline doesn't deliver then that airline is a common thief and has defrauded the pax. The fare differential of $7,500 is huge and something needs to be tied to it.

I think a suit for $10,000,000 would get them to understand why people buy Business Class.



Some people don't get it. Business is about making MONEY!
User currently offlineReality From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 506 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (6 years 4 months 4 days 2 hours ago) and read 3046 times:



Quoting BillReid (Thread starter):
A Domestic B764 was subbed in without Business Class but with domestic first with a 32" pitch and limited recline.

I think domestic first has 39 - 40" pitch, not 32". Though that is no substitute for 60" on Business Elite.


User currently offlineVfw614 From Germany, joined Dec 2001, 4030 posts, RR: 5
Reply 7, posted (6 years 4 months 3 days 19 hours ago) and read 2940 times:



Quoting Jhooper (Reply 4):

Why don't they just simplify the CoC by saying, "You agree t

 bigthumbsup 

My understanding as per the infamous "1.800 US$"-thread is that the legal situation in the US is pretty much like that  banghead   white 


User currently offlineAFGMEL From Australia, joined Jul 2007, 745 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 4 months 3 days 15 hours ago) and read 2828 times:

I am not sure how it works in the US, but I know that in Aus a company have have any terms and conditions it likes, but they cannot trump the law, be it fair trading or a right to compensation. In other words you cannot sign away your rights no matter how many boxes you ticked.


B 727-44/200 732/3/4/8/9 767-3 742/3/4, 772/3, A319/20/21 332/333 342/3 , DC3/4/10, F28/50/100, ATR72
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 9, posted (6 years 4 months 3 days 14 hours ago) and read 2776 times:



Quoting AFGMEL (Reply 8):
In other words you cannot sign away your rights no matter how many boxes you ticked.

This is where I'm more than a little uncertain about the OP's recourse if any.

It seems that in the OP's mind, his expecation for business class was primarially the physical environment -- seat pitch, recline, IFE/PTV (not even sure if that's the case on DL), etc.

The airline may argue that the OP had no reasonable expectation of the physical items, and that they did, in fact, provide Business Class service in the way of a lower passenger/flight attendant ratio, more substantial meals, more frequent and personal service, and provided "business class" accomidation (as in, "better than Economy Class")

In order to succeed in a lawsuit, my understanding [and I'm not a lawyer, so I could be way off in left field] is that the OP would need to prove that his expected level of service was reasonable based on the representations made to him by the airline and the terms of the Conditions of Carriage, Fare Rules, and applicable Tariffs don't affirmitively state otherwise (if this was a domestic flight, I think that Rule 3's "Delta may without notice substitute alternate carriers or aircraft," would leave any claim of misrepresentation/etc. sunk, but since that same term isn't in the ICoC, there's potentially more wiggle room)

And since this is international travel, the provisions of the Warsaw or Montreal Convention may be in effect, which limits the maximum liability of the carrier (however, since there wasn't true "personal injury" that may have no applicability in this case)

Bottom line, the OP should write a -real- letter (not email) to Delta Customer Care, explain his concern/fustration and see if they don't to something to "make things right", even if they may not be contractually obligated to do so.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineBillReid From Netherlands, joined Jun 2006, 1021 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 4 months 3 days 6 hours ago) and read 2668 times:

my concern is that an airline can sub acft without compensation yet an airline may charge for extras at any time. My concern is that the customer is held at hostage.

If I order a pr of size 11 Gucci shoes from Delta Airlines Retail and find one shoe in the box was changed to a size 9 does the Delta have the right to say "well the shoes still can get you where you want, you just wont be as comfortable, so accept it. After all the shoe sorter can go kapot from time to time."



Some people don't get it. Business is about making MONEY!
User currently offlineDLPhoenix From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 420 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 4 months 3 days 5 hours ago) and read 2638 times:

1) I believe the OP was not booked on C/J on that flight. He was making a general inquiry out of curiosity (which is the purpose of this forum).
2) The language of the CoC will let the airlines get away with murder. They will do anything in their power to prevent it from being challenged in court.
3) Item 2 above applies to business class passengers even more. They will require a much higher price to reach settlement once they decide to take legal action.
4) When Delta started flying the 764 on international routes they sold the domestic first seats as coach. I would assume that as a minimum they will pay back the difference or offer similar compensation (assuming they apply common sense  Smile)

DLP


User currently offlineBillReid From Netherlands, joined Jun 2006, 1021 posts, RR: 0
Reply 12, posted (6 years 4 months 3 days 4 hours ago) and read 2604 times:

DLP I the OP actually flew that flight using a PM upgrade certificate from M class. The service onboard was acceptable I however would not conclude that the meal and drink service was worth the price differential over the lowest available Y class fare (about $600 each way) without the sleeper seat. DL offered no for of compensation, apology or warning. But further what about a pax that paid the $8550 r/t fare, how screwed was he?

What is ironic is two days earlier i paid a $200 change fee to return one day earlier on the Saturday. It is ironic that I for all intent paid $200 to dowgrade without a word of thanks from DL.

I am not complaining but i find it bizarre that DL has millions of rules the pax must follow yet DL has none they must.

By definition we may be defining why I (and many million more) value C class on any Euro carrier as being worth about $1,500 to $2,000 more than on DL or CO or NW or AA or US or UA. Simply we may be defining why premium pax may chose AF or KL over DL yet they still gather the FF miles. Is this not why the US carriers are bleeding to death and even in this high fuel environment KL and AF are profitable. Customer service?



Some people don't get it. Business is about making MONEY!
User currently offlineVfw614 From Germany, joined Dec 2001, 4030 posts, RR: 5
Reply 13, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2509 times:



Quoting BillReid (Reply 5):
Thanks for the answers. I have a great difficulty with DL telling a passenger oh well.

In which country was the booking made (= contract signed)? If within the EU, the CoC are subject to scrutiny under EU law standards which are somewhat more consumer-friendly than US standards.

Usually, the right to change details of the mode of transportation does not necessarily mean that the airline is not subject to a reduction of the paid price. The interesting point one needs to think about is whether "C" class is more about comfy seat or more about flexible tickets. As there are also flexible Y class tickets, I guess the former would be true.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 9):
n order to succeed in a lawsuit, my understanding [and I'm not a lawyer, so I could be way off in left field] is that the OP would need to prove that his expected level of service was reasonable based on the representations made to him by the airline and the terms of the Conditions of Carriage, Fare Rules, and applicable Tariffs don't affirmitively state otherwise

I do not think so, but have to admit that I look at it from a civil law background: While the CoC of course is the starting point, the way a product is advertised and marketed also defines to some extent what the airline eventually has to offer / the benchmark is for compensation. So if, for example, your website, ads, brochures etc. all make a blast about your trans-atlantic product, you will be stuck with it even if the CoC does not mention it. Same as buying a car: The contract usually does not mention all details of the car - while brochures, catalogues etc. do. So if you buy a BMW 540i, does the car maker get away with it because the contract does not mention a few small details? No, he does not. What is different is course then burden of proof etc.


User currently offlineJhooper From United States of America, joined Dec 2001, 6204 posts, RR: 12
Reply 14, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 17 hours ago) and read 2501 times:



Quoting Vfw614 (Reply 13):
I do not think so, but have to admit that I look at it from a civil law background: While the CoC of course is the starting point, the way a product is advertised and marketed also defines to some extent what the airline eventually has to offer / the benchmark is for compensation. So if, for example, your website, ads, brochures etc. all make a blast about your trans-atlantic product, you will be stuck with it even if the CoC does not mention it. Same as buying a car: The contract usually does not mention all details of the car - while brochures, catalogues etc. do. So if you buy a BMW 540i, does the car maker get away with it because the contract does not mention a few small details? No, he does not. What is different is course then burden of proof etc.

Obiously, Delta markets their 'new' Business Elite seats (with the completely lie-flat seats) which I believe only the select few 777LRs are equipped with. If I book a J ticket, believing I'll get the lie-flat seat, only to find when I board the "standard" Business Elite seats? No. I presume DL will use the same argument to get out of compensating you in your case.



Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 15, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 16 hours ago) and read 2484 times:



Quoting Vfw614 (Reply 13):
Same as buying a car: The contract usually does not mention all details of the car - while brochures, catalogues etc. do. So if you buy a BMW 540i, does the car maker get away with it because the contract does not mention a few small details?

I would argue (perhaps incorrectly, as I am not a lawyer in this or any other country) that there's a difference between a detail not being referenced in a contract and a detail being specifically excluded in a contract -- but then we're back to the problem of DL warning that they may substitute aircraft, services, and carriers at will in the Domestic but not International contract. This is why I think that there's a slightly (if only minutely) better chance of someone winning a claim over this issue on an International flight, though the likelihood of winning damages greater than what you actually paid for the ticket is slim, and the cost of litigating high.

If I buy a "BMW" for $xxxxx and all of the pictures in the literature are of 745s (International Business), but the disclaimer warns that due to manufacturing (operational) reasons they may deliver a 545 (Domestic First)...

The other thing is looking at it from the airline's point of view (and even some business travelers), they put their priority on getting you from where you started to where you wanted to end up as close as possible to the schedule they originally committed to safely.

I know in my (domestic) business travels I've put up with a lot of crap -- on full Y fares -- to get where I needed to get on time (a non-reclining middle seat between two very large gentlemen, as one example, a seat that looked and smelled like someone had vomited on it as another [but I had a plastic bag to sit on, at least!])

I would suspect that if the traveler told DL (after seeing the seat, before departure) that the substitution was not acceptable and he'd prefer to wait for a later flight with a 'proper' international business cabin, they may have been willing and/or able to reaccommodate him with no penalty-- then again, I had a DL supervisor scream at me when I enquired about missing luggage.

I can also say that traveling upgraded on miles, the airline may have been willing to do less for him [at the time] than travelers on fully paid business. I know during irops with CO operated flights, as a full-fare economy passenger I've been given more options (including off-line protection/rerouting/reaccomidation) than similar passengers on deeply discounted or frequent flyer tickets.

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineVfw614 From Germany, joined Dec 2001, 4030 posts, RR: 5
Reply 16, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2449 times:



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 15):
If I buy a "BMW" for $xxxxx and all of the pictures in the literature are of 745s (International Business), but the disclaimer warns that due to manufacturing (operational) reasons they may deliver a 545 (Domestic First)...

From a legal point of view, a couple of things need to be distinguished: One is whether the airline has the right to substitute equipment and still can expect the passengers being bound by the contract (probably: yes). Another question is if, in the event that both parties are still bound by the contract, the airline can still charge the original price for the product (probably: no).

It is pretty much a standard contract law problem: To what point (read: disappointment) is one party bound by the contract and cannot walk away from the contract - but maybe demand a reasonable reduction of his obligation (= price) that reflects the lower quality of the product he is forced to accept.


User currently offlineIkramerica From United States of America, joined May 2005, 21562 posts, RR: 59
Reply 17, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 15 hours ago) and read 2436 times:



Quoting BillReid (Reply 5):
"Your contract cost you $8,550r/t and sorry the aircraft with the business class was broken. But we do have another nice plane that doesn't have C class. Go screw yourself!"

At most, DL offered a Y+ TATL service with 38" non-international seats. The pax could consult other airlines that have Y+ and J, calculate the percentage difference, apply it to their fare, and ask for a refund of that amount. DL would be hard pressed to justify that they are not entitled. But I assume they would try?

A smarter move would be to offer each pax enough mileage for the plan ahead J award for the route in question in lieu of money.

Quoting DLPhoenix (Reply 11):
4) When Delta started flying the 764 on international routes they sold the domestic first seats as coach. I would assume that as a minimum they will pay back the difference or offer similar compensation (assuming they apply common sense  )

This is a good point and another way to look at it. If DL (and AA for that matter) have previously determined that the seating in F on these planes is so inferior that they can only be sold as Y seating internationally, then they have little justification for later claiming that they are equivalent to J seating. In this case, pax have a good case to demand a complete refund between the J and Y fare (and not the full fare Y, but the Y that is similar to the rules that apply to your J ticket when you bought it). This amount would be more than the Y+ based discount above.



Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
User currently offlineBillReid From Netherlands, joined Jun 2006, 1021 posts, RR: 0
Reply 18, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2364 times:



Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 17):
At most, DL offered a Y+ TATL service with 38" non-international seats. The pax could consult other airlines that have Y+ and J, calculate the percentage difference, apply it to their fare, and ask for a refund of that amount. DL would be hard pressed to justify that they are not entitled. But I assume they would try?

A smarter move would be to offer each pax enough mileage for the plan ahead J award for the route in question in lieu of money.

DL did not bother to tell anyone. We all found out onboard the acft and as the acft came in 90 minutes late we were all waiting for a delayed departure. As it was still a B767-400 at the gate we were all clueless to the swap.

I was offered nothing yet I had rendered a PMU for the segment from a M fare. I should have gotten the PMU certificate back.



Some people don't get it. Business is about making MONEY!
User currently offlineAirNZ From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 5 hours ago) and read 2358 times:



Quoting BillReid (Reply 5):
If a pax contracts for C class and pays for it, then if the airline doesn't deliver then that airline is a common thief and has defrauded the pax.

Bit strong words there in my opinion, but what I would expect? Do you feel the same when a pax tries to defraud the airline?

Quoting BillReid (Reply 10):
If I order a pr of size 11 Gucci shoes from Delta Airlines Retail and find one shoe in the box was changed to a size 9 does the Delta have the right to say "well the shoes still can get you where you want, you just wont be as comfortable, so accept it. After all the shoe sorter can go kapot from time to time."

You're talking absolute nonsense, and you know it!


User currently offlineReality From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 506 posts, RR: 0
Reply 20, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 4 hours ago) and read 2334 times:



Quoting BillReid (Reply 5):
Go screw yourself!"



Quoting BillReid (Reply 5):
If a pax contracts for C class and pays for it, then if the airline doesn't deliver then that airline is a common thief



Quoting BillReid (Reply 10):
My concern is that the customer is held at hostage.



Quoting BillReid (Reply 18):
DL did not bother to tell anyone.

Instead of whining here, why don't you contact Delta. Let us know what they offer. You have a legitimate case--assuming that you speak the truth.


User currently offlineDLPhoenix From United States of America, joined Aug 2007, 420 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (6 years 4 months 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 2285 times:



Quoting BillReid (Reply 12):
DLP I the OP actually flew that flight using a PM upgrade certificate from M class.



Quoting BillReid (Reply 12):
But further what about a pax that paid the $8550 r/t fare, how screwed was he?



Quoting BillReid (Reply 18):
was offered nothing yet I had rendered a PMU for the segment from a M fare. I should have gotten the PMU certificate back.

Bill,

1) I apologize for he misunderstandingg,
2) IMHO you and every other unlucky customer that was seating in BE (or Domestic F) are entitled for a partial refund. I believe that the fact that they did not sell the same seats as BE in the past will convince them to accommodate.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 15):
I can also say that traveling upgraded on miles, the airline may have been willing to do less for him [at the time] than travelers on fully paid business.

You are overlooking the fact that he purchased an upgradable fare tha cost him more than the minumum available fare, and that he may have elected to fly a different route/airline if he would have been aware of the level of service.

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 17):
A smarter move would be to offer each pax enough mileage for the plan ahead J award for the route in question in lieu of money.

I would refuse to accept miles under the current circumstances. They may give me enough miles for the "last seat" 3rd tier, only to introduce an "every seat" tier for twice the miles next week.  Smile


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