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Airline Fee's Payment With Big Bills  
User currently offlineRyeFly From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1396 posts, RR: 0
Posted (6 years 3 weeks 1 day ago) and read 1880 times:

All these extra fee's are really getting annoying. Why not annoy the airlines back if we need to pay using large bills? $15.00 for a checked bag, pay with $100.00 bill. $2.00 for a coke, pay with a $50.00 bill and so on. It's not your problem if they don't have proper change, you are trying to pay the fee aren't you? I have yet to see a airline website that states it does not accept large bills. Isn't it illegal to not accept legal tender on items for sale? If they can't come up with the change, then demand it to be complimentary. A few people may end up paying and getting change, things would get interesting if a lot of people did it per flight. After you get your coke you paid $2.00 with a $50.00, how about asking for a receipt?

14 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineMax550 From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 1148 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1848 times:

Better yet, carry rolls of quarters and nickels with you, add some extra weight.

User currently offlineAloha73G From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2362 posts, RR: 4
Reply 2, posted (6 years 3 weeks 23 hours ago) and read 1834 times:



Quoting RyeFly (Thread starter):
Isn't it illegal to not accept legal tender on items for sale?

I ran in to this argument a few times while working as an F/A for a cashless airline, HA.

here's the explanation from the US Treasury.

Quote:
Question: I thought that United States currency was legal tender for all debts. Some businesses or governmental agencies say that they will only accept checks, money orders or credit cards as payment, and others will only accept currency notes in denominations of $20 or smaller. Isn't this illegal?

Answer:The pertinent portion of law that applies to your question is the Coinage Act of 1965, specifically Section 31 U.S.C. 5103, entitled "Legal tender," which states: "United States coins and currency (including Federal reserve notes and circulating notes of Federal reserve banks and national banks) are legal tender for all debts, public charges, taxes, and dues."

This statute means that all United States money as identified above are a valid and legal offer of payment for debts when tendered to a creditor. There is, however, no Federal statute mandating that a private business, a person or an organization must accept currency or coins as for payment for goods and/or services. Private businesses are free to develop their own policies on whether or not to accept cash unless there is a State law which says otherwise. For example, a bus line may prohibit payment of fares in pennies or dollar bills. In addition, movie theaters, convenience stores and gas stations may refuse to accept large denomination currency (usually notes above $20) as a matter of policy.

-Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlinePhilSquares From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (6 years 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1772 times:



Quoting RyeFly (Thread starter):
Why not annoy the airlines back if we need to pay using large bills?

But aren't you shooting the messenger? You are putting the (fill in the blank) Flight attendant, Customer Service Agent, Other in the middle of your issues? Seems just a little juvenile to me and if the airline doesn't have the ability to make change I'm sure they'd be more than willing to refund the cost of your ticket. Try purchasing a new ticket on the day of departure.

Seems to me it might cost a little less to have small change!


User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (6 years 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1749 times:



Quoting PhilSquares (Reply 3):
Seems just a little juvenile to me and if the airline doesn't have the ability to make change I'm sure they'd be more than willing to refund the cost of your ticket. Try purchasing a new ticket on the day of departure.

And, as has already bee posted, the airline is not required to accept a high-value bill (or hundreds of nickles) -- nothing stopping them from "Sir, if you'd like to check this bag I'm either going to need a credit card, debit card, or you can use the ATM over there [that charges a $5.00 surcharge that your bank tacks another $3.50 on to] to withdraw a $20.00. You may, of course, leave the bag in your car if you'd prefer not to comply"

Lincoln



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlineSKORD From United Kingdom, joined Apr 2008, 562 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (6 years 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1744 times:

In the UK, shops will simply refuse the transaction if they cant break the bill. End of story, you have to go somewhere else. There is also some wierd, VERY old law, which says you have to pay in an "accepted" form of payment i.e. you cannot pay for a product worth £5, in 500 1pence pieces.

Most Banks now in the UK wont even accept deposits in small coins if its over a certain amount, i think its maybe £25??


User currently offlinePhxIAHszxJNU From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 37 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (6 years 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1705 times:

Actually paying by a debit card will cost the airline more if you include the interchange fees


James
User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 7, posted (6 years 3 weeks 21 hours ago) and read 1685 times:



Quoting PhxIAHszxJNU (Reply 6):
Actually paying by a debit card will cost the airline more if you include the interchange fees

It really depends... I've seen studies that claim for large orginizations that total cost of credit/debit cards is less than cash or checks (much harder for employees to "skim", less risk of accidental loss, overhead of sorting and physically depositing bills, loss due to counterfit bills or forged checks, etc.

Of course, that's not really applicable with a mom&pop corner conveinence store, but I would imagine it's very true with orginizations the size of airlines.



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently offlinePhxIAHszxJNU From United States of America, joined Jul 2008, 37 posts, RR: 0
Reply 8, posted (6 years 3 weeks 20 hours ago) and read 1667 times:



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 7):
It really depends... I've seen studies that claim for large orginizations that total cost of credit/debit cards is less than cash or checks (much harder for employees to "skim", less risk of accidental loss, overhead of sorting and physically depositing bills, loss due to counterfit bills or forged checks, etc.

I would believe that, I was just thinking in terms of of paying $5 they get the the entire amount versus what Visa or MC takes as part of the transaction.



James
User currently offlineHPAEAA From United States of America, joined May 2006, 1024 posts, RR: 1
Reply 9, posted (6 years 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1530 times:



Quoting RyeFly (Thread starter):
I have yet to see a airline website that states it does not accept large bills. Isn't it illegal to not accept legal tender on items for sale?

yes if they accept cash...

Quoting Aloha73G (Reply 2):
I ran in to this argument a few times while working as an F/A for a cashless airline, HA.

if they don't accept cash its a diffrent arguement....



Why do I fly???
User currently offlineJpax From United States of America, joined Aug 2006, 1018 posts, RR: 0
Reply 10, posted (6 years 3 weeks 16 hours ago) and read 1512 times:

Quoting RyeFly (Thread starter):
All these extra fee's are really getting annoying.

Does it cost you more now to fill your car than it did last year? Yes, it does. Why would filling an airliner be any different? The price difference must be made somehow, airlines are a business. What is the primary goal of a business? Aside from "pleasing the customer," it is very simple: to make money.

You can take the train and pay more and take longer, or drive. The airlines won't miss you. In the end, you are the loser. You want to be a smartass and pay with a large denomination not accepted? You don't eat or drink. You don't want to pay extra fees? You hit the rails or the road. Someone else will take your seat, pay the fees, and carry around singles.

[Edited 2008-07-30 17:40:23]

User currently offlineCrewchief From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (6 years 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 1501 times:

Although paying in small change or large bills might make *you* feel better, I don't think it will change the airline policies at all. Your protest will only be felt by the front line personnel. Upper management simply won't care.

Quoting Jpax (Reply 10):
Does it cost you more now to fill your car than it did last year? Yes, it does.

I believe the OP's suggestion is based on the feeling that the many fees are getting annoying, not that airlines are charging too much overall. Putting it another way, if gas stations charged a $5 "pump fee" and a $10 "park by the pump" fee" in lieu of charging more per gallon, the *fees* would be annoying. I and others would much rather have the full price in the gallon of gas, and in the ticket price.


User currently offlineLincoln From United States of America, joined Nov 2004, 3887 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (6 years 3 weeks 15 hours ago) and read 1485 times:



Quoting Jpax (Reply 10):
What is the primary goal of a business? Aside from "pleasing the customer," it is very simple: to make money

In therory, businesses don't give a damn at all about pleasing the customer; their one and only priority is generating a return for their investors/stockholders.

In reality, for better or worse, most businesses need to please -- or at least placate -- their customers in order to make that happen.

That being said, I'd much rather pay a slightly higher "bundled" fare that includes all of the traditional features -- 2 checked bags, meal, beverage, etc) then be nickle-and-dimed.

I'm also, though, not that price sensitive -- For business travel, I have to book full Y (on CO) anyway, and for personal travel, I either fly on CO and pay whatever the fare is or I don't fly.

I'm also happy that for the most part airlines (at least that I pay attention to) haven't started "unbundling" full-fare tickets/Elite benefits -- When I book my full Y business travel, I can still check the 2 bags that I need without whipping out a credit card at the airport.

Lincoln
(Funny thing is I refuse to bundle my utilities -- I have gone out of my way to have different telephone, cable, and internet service providers... And I occassionally play them against each other when I have a customer service issue)



CO Is My Airline of Choice || Baggage Claim is an airline's last chance to disappoint a customer || Next flts in profile
User currently onlineN202PA From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1562 posts, RR: 3
Reply 13, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 20 hours ago) and read 1378 times:

RyeFly, I think the spirit of your post is right, but as has been pointed out, it's not likely to work.

Why not choose not to do business with airlines that charge fees, and spread the word? Many people choosing to buy airfare based on the best value (and not the cheapest price) would put the bottomfeeder airlines like UA and US out of business for good.


User currently offlineSeaBosDca From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 5378 posts, RR: 4
Reply 14, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 19 hours ago) and read 1325 times:



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 12):
In therory, businesses don't give a damn at all about pleasing the customer; their one and only priority is generating a return for their investors/stockholders.

 checkmark 

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 12):
In reality, for better or worse, most businesses need to please -- or at least placate -- their customers in order to make that happen.

Nope. They need to get the customers to patronize them, nothing more, nothing less. In a market as ridiculously price-sensitive as the airline industry, that means one and only one thing: the lowest possible upfront price. Literally 98% of airline customers have repeatedly proven that they will take any abuse you can dish out if it lowers the price.

Keeping the customers, not making them feel good, is how you make the stockholders happy.

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 12):
That being said, I'd much rather pay a slightly higher "bundled" fare that includes all of the traditional features -- 2 checked bags, meal, beverage, etc) then be nickle-and-dimed.

I probably would too, on flights of four hours or more. But the market has spoken and it doesn't agree with us. There is no alternative but to factor the price of the services into our budgets. And, honestly, the flexibility to pay rock bottom fares when I don't want services is helpful.

Quoting PhilSquares (Reply 3):
You are putting the (fill in the blank) Flight attendant, Customer Service Agent, Other in the middle of your issues?

 checkmark  checkmark  checkmark 

Everyone needs to remember this when they're trying to get even with a business. The people who usually take the brunt of such efforts almost certainly had no control whatsoever over whatever decision is making you upset. Demand to speak with supervisors. Call customer complaint lines. Find executives' phone numbers and call them. But don't make life hard for the line employees.


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