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UAL Alpa Bails Out UA Management  
User currently offlineTozairport From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 682 posts, RR: 1
Posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 6078 times:

I'm sure someone will find something bad to say about ALPA on this, but the fact of the matter is that we did the right thing while UAL management sat on their hands and lied. The pilots of United are committed to making this airline a better place, while management incompetence continues to make the airline a laughing stock. Here's the article:



August 20, 2008


Someone at United Airlines has a heart after all. But don't go looking for it at the corporate offices.

The folks there are still coming up with excuses for their scandalous treatment of Anita Cabral and her family, whose long-planned Hawaiian vacation was ruined when United refused to honor in June the tickets it sold them in December.

In this saga, the good guys don't wear suits. They wear uniforms.

Yesterday, as the airline was giving its latest jaw-dropping explanation for its behavior – more on that later – its pilots stepped up to help the victims.

“We're obviously not in the business of trying to make up for all of United's misdeeds, but this is a unique situation,” Capt. Jay Heppner, a spokesman for the pilots union, told me.

“We're just horrified at what happened to this family.”

Heppner called from London after reading last week's column recounting how United – on the eve of the Cabral family's flight from Los Angeles to Kona – bumped them from their long-assigned seats.

As a result, the party of eight had to cancel a much-anticipated vacation and missed a family reunion and a visit to Cabral's ailing ex-husband – the father or grandfather of half the party. He died soon after.

The United pilots can't heal those wounds, Heppner said.

But today Cabral, of Spring Valley, will receive a check from the United chapter of the Airline Pilots Association for $11,693. That covers their nonrefundable expenses, primarily the cost of renting a beach house they never set foot in.

Meanwhile, corporate United has opened an investigation.

“We screwed up,” spokeswoman Robin Urbanski said.

But United's explanation of how it screwed up – version 4.0 – is enough to shred your last bit of confidence in the airline's reservation system.

Urbanski said the Cabral family was bumped from the plane not because United overbooked the flight, but because the family overbooked it.

She said the family reserved 16 seats – eight with United and eight with US Airways, which operates one leg of the flight – and as a consequence, lost all 16 seats.

Urbanski said a United employee saw both sets of reservations and “mistakenly and regrettably canceled the wrong one.”

I ran this crazy scenario past Deanna Kawasaki, who made the reservations for her family. Kawasaki runs a Simi Valley consulting company and is a fastidious record keeper.

“That's ludicrous,” she said.

Kawasaki said she has never booked anything on US Airways, which, after
all, doesn't even fly between Los Angeles and Hawaii.

“I know what I did,” she said. “I only put my credit card in one place.”
Urbanski had an explanation for that: The Cabrals made an “unconfirmed reservation” – a reservation that wasn't confirmed and wasn't paid for.

That sounds like an oxymoron to me, and I told Urbanski so. I don't believe airlines hold seats on flights if no one's paid for them, not for more than 48 hours, anyway. They certainly wouldn't hold them for nearly six months, not for a peak-season flight to Hawaii.

She assured me they do it all the time. Maybe that's why United is losing money.

Kawasaki was not so amused. “They're grasping at straws,” she said.

For United's story to hold up, she pointed out, we would have to believe that a cash-strapped airline held eight unpaid seats on a sold-out flight for six months and never sent her an e-mail of confirmation, or one asking for payment, or even one to inform her that she had lost her seats.

She noted that United has tried blaming the debacle on a flight cancellation, then on a lost reservation and then, by mail, on a “Schedule Change due to Operational problems affecting our operation.”

Only after the family retained a lawyer, she said, did it point its finger back at them.

I trust Kawasaki. But following Ronald Reagan's admonition, “Trust, but verify,” I called US Airways anyway.

I found Derek Hanna in the media office and asked him if US Airways had booked any reservations for Cabral or Kawasaki on June 16.

“We don't have a record of any reservations for them,” Hanna reported back. He said that includes “unconfirmed reservations,” a concept I had to explain to him.

Then, late yesterday, Urbanski said the “unconfirmed reservations” were made through Orbitz.com. She sent me a word document dated Dec. 28 – a day after the family bought its tickets on United.com.

“None of this makes sense,” said Kawasaki, who told me she never booked anything with Orbitz, and certainly wouldn't have done so one day after forking over $7,715 to United.

Putting on her consulting hat, Kawasaki said United has serious problems if it's accepting “unconfirmed reservations” from third parties and using them to bump paying customers from its flights.

No one's disagreeing.

The Cabral family, meanwhile, is thankful for the pilots' generosity, but weary of United's ever-evolving excuses. “We just want this to end,” Kawasaki said.

In a note, Anita Cabral wrote, “My husband, a Methodist minister, is in the forgiveness business – not me.”

While United has not sought nor acquired her forgiveness, she said, the pilots redeemed the company in her eyes.

“God bless them, they are the true heroes in this mess where so many people have behaved badly.”


Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.
22 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineBobnwa From United States of America, joined Dec 2000, 6441 posts, RR: 9
Reply 1, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 6019 times:



Quoting Tozairport (Thread starter):
I'm sure someone will find something bad to say about ALPA on this, but the fact of the matter is that we did the right thing while UAL management sat on their hands and lied. The pilots of United are committed to making this airline a better place, while management incompetence continues to make the airline a laughing stock. Here's the article:

What ia the source of this article?


User currently offlineAv8r915 From United States of America, joined May 2007, 32 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5977 times:



Quoting Bobnwa (Reply 1):
What ia the source of this article?

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/m...braun/20080820-9999-1m20braun.html


User currently offlineFlyf15 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 3, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5942 times:

Glad to see that someone in that company cares about their customers, its pretty obvious that management does not.

Then again, how could you care about your customers when you're so busy destroying the airline and lining your pockets in the meantime?


User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22718 posts, RR: 20
Reply 4, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 7 hours ago) and read 5822 times:



Quoting Flyf15 (Reply 3):

Then again, how could you care about your customers when you're so busy destroying the airline and lining your pockets in the meantime?

While I think most of us around here could agree that UA management isn't exactly a bastion of competence, I'm not sure what good this sort of rhetoric does, especially from pilots.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 5, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5724 times:

This was the second article from a second-rate columnist in the San Diego Union Tribune. Most of the information in the article was drivel.

A family of eight was planning to travel to Hawaii for a family reunion. Due to a double booking with United and a US Airways codeshare flight, one of the reservations was canceled and along with it, the family's assigned seats.

The family contends that because the "seats" they had booked were canceled, they were "bumped" from the flight several days before it left.

I emailed the author at the Union Trib and told him that losing your assigned seats does not constitute bumping and that bumping only happens at the airport if the plane leaves without you. I don't think the writer Gerry Braun was interested in accuracy.

The first article about this matter can be found at:

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/m...braun/20080813-9999-1m13braun.html

Some of Gerry Braun's other headlines for his column include:

"Starbucks' early logo has critic piping hot "
"Trickling drinking fountains are all wet"
"Take down campaign signs, you scofflaws"
"Probation in gun crime no reason to throw party"

All in all, he is pretty small beer.


User currently offlineZWZWUnited From United States of America, joined Jun 2008, 197 posts, RR: 0
Reply 6, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5677 times:

This is what United is all about. It is about the employees, not the management. Employees are the ones who truly care about their passengers, not the management. We are what keep the airlines afloat. As long we continue to go above and beyond in our efforts to take care of our passengers, they will continue to come back and "fly the friendly skies".

~Tim  Smile



Drop it like its hott!
User currently offlineN471WN From United States of America, joined Dec 2003, 1511 posts, RR: 2
Reply 7, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5662 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

For those who see US Television and are watching the Olympics, the BEST commercial is the United Airlines one .....simply brilliant commercial making.......BUT so sad that a great commercial like that is airing on TV while this airline is being systematcially decimated through incompetent management.

They should have saved the money they spent on the commercial to give to the employees who will lose thier jobs


User currently offlineLegacytravel From United States of America, joined Aug 2005, 1067 posts, RR: 2
Reply 8, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5583 times:

I have stated this before and I will state this again. I fly United for the employees only not because of the damn company. After being crapped on and treated like crap they still are for the most part professional and courteous to me in the air. I am as big of a union basher you will find but this time kudos to the union for taking care of what UAL F' d up.

Mark in MKE



I love the smell of Jet fuel in the Morning
User currently offlineERJ170 From United States of America, joined Apr 2004, 6754 posts, RR: 17
Reply 9, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5561 times:

All I got to say is..

This is JACKED up! There is no excuse for a corporation to act in this way. United should repay the pilots, refund the ticket, and pay for the incurred emotional damage of missing the chance to see a dying family member. If they don't pony up on their own, then I'm sure a lawyer will be more than happy to assist.

How has the US airline industry fallen into such disarray? Perhaps it IS time for a bit of re-regulation.. at least for a couple of years..



Aiming High and going far..
User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 10, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 6 hours ago) and read 5499 times:



Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 9):
United should repay the pilots, refund the ticket, and pay for the incurred emotional damage of missing the chance to see a dying family member.

Actually, United did refund the cost of the tickets. The $10,000 paid by the pilots was for the cost of renting a house in Hawaii which the family never used. I can't see any airline ever refunding such an amount for unused lodgings.

In addition, if you read the first article, the family purchased Trip Insurance and the Insurance company is not willing to pay the claim. In order to pay the claim, the Insurer wants some sort of letter from United admitting culpability which United is unwilling to issue.

As I said in the email I sent to Gerry Braun, I felt the problems were entirely the families fault, not United's. There was some discrepancy with the assigned seating in their reservation which they could have resolved if they went to the airport on the day of the flight. But they never went to the airport at all.

Quoting ERJ170 (Reply 9):
I'm sure a lawyer will be more than happy to assist.

Actually, the family has consulted a lawyer. The impression I received from reading between the lines of the article is that the lawyer told them they did not have a leg to stand on.

The family had a valid reservation which they had paid in full. They canceled the reservation and United refunded the full amount to them. They then began a sob story with a lot of inaccuracies which an ambulance-chasing columnist in the Union Tribune gussied up for print. There really is nothing there.


User currently offlineIloveboeing From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 794 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 5428 times:



Quoting Flyf15 (Reply 3):

Then again, how could you care about your customers when you're so busy destroying the airline and lining your pockets in the meantime?

That's exactly what they are doing. UA management seems to have no regard for the customers, especially in Y class. They seem to think of the people as commodities, rather than human beings.

Quoting ZWZWUnited (Reply 6):
This is what United is all about. It is about the employees, not the management. Employees are the ones who truly care about their passengers, not the management. We are what keep the airlines afloat. As long we continue to go above and beyond in our efforts to take care of our passengers, they will continue to come back and "fly the friendly skies".

I know that many UA employees are trying their hardest to provide good customer service with the limited resources that management has given them. Management has got to stop the incessant cutting and "new revenue opportunities," and actually spend the money to upgrade the product, in ALL classes. They need to stop thinking of themselves and their bonuses, and think of the people, for a change.

UA has plenty of cash on hand ($3.3 billion as of June 30, 2008---according to Yahoo Finance). That is plenty of money to upgrade the fleet. They need to forgo their bonuses, stock options, etc and spend the money where it is needed.

UA needs an upgraded, internationally-competitive product in ALL classes. And no, new lighting and new seat-covers in Y on the 744s doesn't cut it! All aircraft, in all classes, fleet-wide, should have PTVs with AVOD, and hot meals should be served on all flights. UA is supposed to be a "premium" airline and they should act like it.

The nickel-and-diming needs to stop. The product neglection needs to stop. The executive greed needs to stop. UA needs to be restored to its former glory; it cannot remain on its current course! Tilton and his gang are running the company into the ground. The company needs new, innovative, and creative leadership!

UA needs to change and they need to change now, before it's too late.


User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8400 posts, RR: 3
Reply 12, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 5361 times:

Quoting Iloveboeing (Reply 11):

The nickel-and-diming needs to stop. The product neglection needs to stop. The executive greed needs to stop. UA needs to be restored to its former glory; it cannot remain on its current course! Tilton and his gang are running the company into the ground. The company needs new, innovative, and creative leadership!

UA needs to change and they need to change now, before it's too late.

What does that have to do with this thread?

UA cancelled some reservations and made a tricky call. These things happen. On AA, CO, NW, LH, EK, SQ. These things happen and reasonable people deal with it every day.

The rez had an irregularity and was zapped. It happens 1,000s of times every day. This is standard practice at all big airlines. It has nothing to do with "executive greed," most executives would not understand reservations intricacies if they bit them in the hiney.

It is crazy to think UA has the time, energy, or obligation to delve into individual vacation plans / funeral arrangements / final exam essays / life stories of its passengers. It is up to the individual to live life. UA is just an airline (a fairly good one) serving zillions of passengers daily. People who imagine there is a "human" attitude factor here fail to realize just how much UA has on its plate every day. Things do not always go perfectly, and no, the CEO does not need to talk to lick away the tears of every person, much less non-customers.

[Edited 2008-08-20 13:08:56]

User currently offlineAA717driver From United States of America, joined Feb 2002, 1566 posts, RR: 13
Reply 13, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 5348 times:

Eghansen--As a paying customer, we're supposed to have a Ph.D. in the Byzantine world of airline reservations? Bull!

This convoluted system we have is broken. It's broken at ALL the airlines (except maybe SWA and a handful of others).

There is no evidence that this customer screwed up and to trash their case simply because you don't like the columnist who wrote about it is lame.

Are you a res agent for UAL? Maybe that would explain your defensive posture.

The major airlines in the U.S. are a customer service train wreck. Sorry, but this story is more than plausible, IMO. TC



FL450, M.85
User currently offlineIloveboeing From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 794 posts, RR: 0
Reply 14, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 5293 times:



Quoting Flighty (Reply 12):
What does that have to do with this thread?

I was making the point of how the executives really messed up. It is mainly because of them that UA is in the pitiful state it is in. I am disgusted with the way that UA management has trashed UA. UA has the potential to be so much more than it is.


User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 5158 times:



Quoting AA717driver (Reply 13):
Eghansen--As a paying customer, we're supposed to have a Ph.D. in the Byzantine world of airline reservations? Bull!

This convoluted system we have is broken. It's broken at ALL the airlines (except maybe SWA and a handful of others).

There is no evidence that this customer screwed up and to trash their case simply because you don't like the columnist who wrote about it is lame.

Are you a res agent for UAL? Maybe that would explain your defensive posture.

The major airlines in the U.S. are a customer service train wreck. Sorry, but this story is more than plausible, IMO. TC

First of all, I am not a reservation agent for UAL. I am a high school math teacher.

In addition, I am not as sure as you that UAL screwed up. There are big holes in the story which need explaining and nobody to do this.

The family claimed that they were traveling to Hawaii to visit a relative dying of cancer. To quote the first article:

---"One year out, they wrote a five-figure check to reserve a five-bedroom, five-bathroom beach house. They bought their tickets from United six months early. They booked a jungle excursion, a luau, a trip in a glass-bottom boat."

If this relative was dying, there does not seem to be any urgency to the visit. It sounds more like a vacation.

The story is:

The family paid $7,700 for eight tickets on UA (and a possible US codeshare) to Hawaii. Here is a quote from the article:

---"The day before they were to depart, Anita's daughter, Deanna Kawasaki, received an e-mail from United telling her she could check in her party online. But the site would not let her."

---When she called United to see what the trouble was, she was told the flight had been canceled."

---But that made no sense. Her stepfather had just confirmed his seat, using a different reservation number, so the flight obviously wasn't canceled.

---United threw out another explanation – a computer “lost” their reservations. That made no sense, either. If her reservations weren't in the computer, why did she get an e-mail telling her to check in?

---At last, United confessed. There was indeed a flight, but they'd been bumped from it. Their assigned seats had been sold to someone else. "

I have several problems with this story. I doubt the reservation agent said the computer had "lost" their reservation. I have no doubt the agent said the computer had "lost" their seat assignment. That is not quite the same thing.

The last part of this quote seems to be a figment of the Cabral's imagination. I don't believe for a minute that the reservation agent said they had been bumped. The only person who can bump you are gate agents. I am even more sure that the agent never said that the assigned seats had been sold to someone else. Assigned seats are never sold, only tickets. Assigned seats can be given out up until the moment of departure. Even stupid reservation agents know this much.

In the second column, there is the following quote:

--"Heppner called from London after reading last week's column recounting how United – on the eve of the Cabral family's flight from Los Angeles to Kona – bumped them from their long-assigned seats.

--As a result, the party of eight had to cancel a much-anticipated vacation and missed a family reunion and a visit to Cabral's ailing ex-husband – the father or grandfather of half the party. He died soon after. "

Mr. Braun seems to have attempted some accuracy when he states that the airline bumped from their long-assigned seats. I thoroughly understand that losing an assigned seat can be aggravating. But the next sentence is hard to swallow. I can't imagine why losing your assigned seat forces you to cancel your vacation and I don't believe the reservation agent ever told them it did.

There is one further quote:

---"She said the family reserved 16 seats – eight with United and eight with US Airways, which operates one leg of the flight – and as a consequence, lost all 16 seats.

---Urbanski said a United employee saw both sets of reservations and “mistakenly and regrettably canceled the wrong one.”"

These two statements are contradictory. Mr. Braun says the family lost all 16 seats and the airline says one of two duplicate reservations were canceled. It seems clear that there was a reservation since the family received emails from UA about it.

*****
To me, there are way to many questions unanswered, too many contradictions in the story. My suspicion for what it is worth is that the family simply wanted their money back for the trip and and now they have it.

I still don't see what United did wrong.


User currently offlineFlighty From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 8400 posts, RR: 3
Reply 16, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 5089 times:



Quoting Eghansen (Reply 15):
It seems clear that there was a reservation since the family received emails from UA about it.

Correct, and if they had gone to the airport when their flight was due to take off, everything would have worked out. It would have required overrides but this happens routinely. My friend just experienced this traveling to Brazil on AC. Her rez was not coming up but she had a confirmation code. This was her salvation, and AC reinstated her rez right there at the ticket counter. I was there and I saw it happen. This family misunderstood things (which is too easy to do) and, by missing their flight, gave up their reservation. It is too bad things are not more clear. But they took it upon themselves to try to understand (and then report) reservations intricacies, which is impossible for the layman to do. Hence the article is entirely misinformed, much as a medical article would be if the sole source were a patient with no training in the field.


User currently offlineAloha73G From United States of America, joined Jul 2003, 2354 posts, RR: 4
Reply 17, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 5081 times:



Quoting Eghansen (Reply 15):
To me, there are way to many questions unanswered, too many contradictions in the story. My suspicion for what it is worth is that the family simply wanted their money back for the trip and and now they have it.

I still don't see what United did wrong.

United apparently DID refund their tickets.

Do you think United would have done so IF all that ahd happened was their seating was screwed up??

It seems that the "duplicate" reservations were cancelled by UA and between the time they were cancelled and when it was discovered enough seats were sold to "overbook" the flight, or the flight was already overbooked and they were not able to be accomodated.

Quoting Eghansen (Reply 15):
The family claimed that they were traveling to Hawaii to visit a relative dying of cancer. To quote the first article:

---"One year out, they wrote a five-figure check to reserve a five-bedroom, five-bathroom beach house. They bought their tickets from United six months early. They booked a jungle excursion, a luau, a trip in a glass-bottom boat."

If this relative was dying, there does not seem to be any urgency to the visit. It sounds more like a vacation.

Heres an idea: They hear dad has cancer and will die within a year. They decide to visit him. They decide to do it over the summer so that kids won't miss school, parents can get time off work, cheaper air fares can be found, appropriate accomodations can be secured, etc.

My Grandma's brother was told earlier this year he would die within 4 months....my grandma didn't rush to Maui to see him...she waited a few months so my mom could get a day off to go with here, to save a few dollars on the tickets and to make sure he & his daughter would be available the day they came. Nothing unreasonable or unusual about this I think.

-Aloha!



Aloha Airlines - The Spirit Moves Us. Gone but NEVER Forgotten. Aloha, A Hui Hou!
User currently offlineEghansen From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 18, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 5050 times:



Quoting Flighty (Reply 16):
Correct, and if they had gone to the airport when their flight was due to take off, everything would have worked out. It would have required overrides but this happens routinely.

I always print out the email of my itinerary when I make the reservation. I have never had any problems doing this even though there have been many times I could not get an advance seat assignment.

I can't speak for United, but when I worked for Continental, the standard advice reservation agents gave to passengers when there was a discrepancy in their reservation was to go to the ticket counter at the airport to resolve the issue. As an agent at the ticket counter, I handled hundreds of problems with screwed up reservations, seat assignments, international documentation, baggage, etc. I suspect that United agents give the same advice as at Continental.


User currently offlineTozairport From United States of America, joined Oct 2005, 682 posts, RR: 1
Reply 19, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 1 day ago) and read 4763 times:



Quoting Iloveboeing (Reply 11):
The nickel-and-diming needs to stop. The product neglection needs to stop. The executive greed needs to stop. UA needs to be restored to its former glory; it cannot remain on its current course! Tilton and his gang are running the company into the ground. The company needs new, innovative, and creative leadership!

Well said. Trust me, you are not alone in thinking this way. Many of the front line employees feel the same way too:

ALPA PRESS RELEASE

United Pilots to CEO: Stop Nickel and Diming Our Passengers

Chicago, Ill., August 20, 2008 – Pilots for United Airlines (Nasdaq: UAUA) strongly oppose the airline’s plans to drastically change its onboard meal service by raising prices for food and drink on most flights and by discontinuing complimentary meal service on many flights to and from Europe, affecting both economy and business class passengers.

The airline claims that rising fuel costs require these changes, although the real reason may be to enable the airline to further reduce flight attendant staffing, which would make onboard service noticeably worse. By any measure, the pilots believe, the proposed changes are a disastrous business strategy that would only drive away customers and encourage them to choose other airlines.

“Rather than taking the fundamental steps necessary to put our airline back on course, such as rationalizing the flight schedule or eliminating excessive perks and bonuses for executives, United’s leadership is penalizing the one constituency that is critical to our airline’s success: its loyal passengers,” said Captain Steve Wallach, Chairman of the United Chapter of the Air Line Pilots Association. “Instead of nickel-and-diming our passengers, United Airlines management should be demonstrating that despite today’s challenges, our passengers still come first.”

Captain Wallach said the proposed changes are just the latest of bad decisions made by United CEO Glenn Tilton.

“Glenn Tilton and his executives can be counted upon to select the path that inflicts the most misery on our passengers,” he said. “We condemn this latest price scheme and we call for its immediate rollback.”

The United pilots have set up a petition on its website www.GlennTilton.com for United passengers to demand the airline to rollback these changes.
___________



Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.
User currently offlineZone1 From United States of America, joined Jan 2005, 1035 posts, RR: 7
Reply 20, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 23 hours ago) and read 4675 times:

Bravo to the United ALPA for making this situation right. I really hope that UA can pull out of what looks to be a flat spin. All the management is doing is trying to make that large cash pile larger so UA looks attractive to other airlines. Unfortunately, the other airlines know this, and will just wait it out until UA kills itself from making bad decisions in order to conserve cash. I stand with the pilots and their union.


/// U N I T E D
User currently offlineF9Animal From United States of America, joined Dec 2004, 4985 posts, RR: 28
Reply 21, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 19 hours ago) and read 4090 times:



Quoting Flyf15 (Reply 3):
Glad to see that someone in that company cares about their customers, its pretty obvious that management does not.

Then again, how could you care about your customers when you're so busy destroying the airline and lining your pockets in the meantime?

Well said. ALPA did a wonderful thing, and if anything, did much more than what Tilton and his cronies will do for anyone.



I Am A Different Animal!!
User currently offlineWowpeter From Hong Kong, joined Oct 2006, 151 posts, RR: 0
Reply 22, posted (5 years 11 months 1 week 18 hours ago) and read 3988 times:



Quoting Eghansen (Reply 15):
I still don't see what United did wrong.

What United did wrong is that the family pay for a trip and United refused their travel. It doesn't matter what happen... if you pay for something, you deserves to get it but if you are bumped off or cancelled from the flight (which ever way you like to call this), then the airline (United in this case) have done something wrong and the family deserve compensations for it. Simple as that...


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