Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Ryanair Plane Returns To Dublin After Take-off Inc  
User currently offlineOa260 From Ireland, joined Nov 2006, 27029 posts, RR: 58
Posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 11 hours ago) and read 4326 times:

A Ryanair flight was forced to return to Dublin airport today after the back of the aircraft hit the runway during take-off.

The airline said "protective tailskid" at the back of the plane struck the runway as it took off and the pilot returned to the airport as a precaution.

A spokeswoman for the airline described it as a “tail-strike” and said it was quite common.

“As a precautionary measure the aircraft returned with oxygen masks deployed and landed safely in Dublin,” the spokeswoman said.

http://home.eircom.net/content/irela...m/breaking/13677444?view=Eircomnet

11 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineGWYIRE From Ireland, joined Sep 2005, 45 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4242 times:

Do oxygen masks automatically deploy where there is a tailstrike or only where the cabin is breached. Also why whould they deploy when the plane is under 10,000 feet?

User currently offlineTommyBP251b From Germany, joined Apr 2006, 460 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4199 times:



Quoting Oa260 (Thread starter):
A spokeswoman for the airline described it as a “tail-strike” and said it was quite common.

Yes, happens every day!  Wink

Quoting GWYIRE (Reply 1):
Also why whould they deploy when the plane is under 10,000 feet?

As a precaution perhaps?



Tom from Cologne
User currently offlineShamrock604 From Ireland, joined Sep 2007, 4181 posts, RR: 12
Reply 3, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4166 times:

I was at DUB when it happened, just near the blue long term car park, so I got a full view. It was the usual FR high energy take off  Wink, angle did look steep, but I didnt think the tail had actually struck. Turned back within minutes, Fire service in attendance etc....

A Monarch A300, Turkish 738 and EI A320 were held on taxiway awaiting the arrival before their subsequent Departure, Arrivals seemed to have been held as it was eerily quiet in terms of movements (for Dublin) in the moments leading up to the landing, so of course it is to be assumed he got priority.

Anyway, all well that ends well...... pax apparently to be reaccomodated on other DUB-STN flights throughout the day.



Flown EI,FR,RE,EIR,VE,SI,TLA,BA,BE,BD,VX,MON,AF,YS,WX,KL,SK,LH,OK,OS,LX,IB,LTU,HLX,4U,SU,CO,DL,UA,AC,PR,MH,SQ,QF, EY, EK
User currently offlineBA1978 From United Kingdom, joined Jan 2004, 185 posts, RR: 0
Reply 4, posted (6 years 2 weeks 6 days 10 hours ago) and read 4147 times:

Would it be quite obvious to a pilot that he had struck the tail on take off or is there something that indicates it has happened?

I imagine the vary considerably in severity and that slight ones may not be that easy to notice they've occured.



There are other ways and there's British Airways
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 5, posted (6 years 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 3799 times:



Quoting BA1978 (Reply 4):
Would it be quite obvious to a pilot that he had struck the tail on take off

Not necessarily obvious unless you did it hard.

Quoting BA1978 (Reply 4):
is there something that indicates it has happened?

Several aircraft have tail strike sensors, so you'd get a cockpit indication. Offhand, I'm not sure if the 737-800 has it or not.

Tom.


User currently offlineRFields5421 From United States of America, joined Jul 2007, 7607 posts, RR: 32
Reply 6, posted (6 years 2 weeks 5 days 21 hours ago) and read 3780 times:



Quoting BA1978 (Reply 4):
Would it be quite obvious to a pilot that he had struck the tail on take off or is there something that indicates it has happened?

The first tail strike I saw was a JAL B747-100 on Guam in the early 70s. I was on the mid-field crash truck with some friends. The marks on the runway and debris indicated the strike continued for about 100 feet.

There was lot of smoke and huge shower of sparks in the daytime.

When the tower ask the pilot his intentions - he asked why, did something happen.

Because the crew did not feel anything, they flew on to Haneda.

I knew a fellow on the flight - sitting near the back of the wings. He told me after he came back to the squadron, he felt nothing unusual on the takeoff.

Sometimes the biggest, most impressive looking thing from the ground is not noticable in the aircraft.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14030 posts, RR: 62
Reply 7, posted (6 years 2 weeks 5 days 16 hours ago) and read 3672 times:

Tailstrikes have a potential danger, damage to the rear pressure bulkhead, which can lead to an explosive decompression and as a result possible damage to the control runs to the tail flight controls. So it is imperative for the crew not to pressurize and to return to base for a thorough inspection of the rear section of the aircraft by engineering.
In most caes only a little bit of steel has been ground of the steel shoe of the tailskid, in stronger cases the shock absorber cartridge inside the tailskid will be crushed (it is a can made out of honeycomb material to be crushed to absorb the energy), but heavy impacts can cause structural damage.

Why the oxygen masks deployed, I cannot say. It could have happened that the impact caused the oxygen mask doors in the PSUs to open or that the flight crew released them manually as a precaution.
I doubt that they climbed above 10,000 feet before returning to the airport, there are no mountains around DUB requiring this.

One thing though is that, whatever things are justifiable to be criticised with Ryanair, they don't take chances with maintenance. They rather ground an airplane and cancel flights than
risking an accident by operating an aircraft with a potential damage.

Jan


User currently offlineLTBEWR From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 13120 posts, RR: 12
Reply 8, posted (6 years 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3528 times:

Tail skids can be serious problems. Sometimes they may just be scraped paint and at other times it can be major structural damage. It was about 3 years ago that a CO 777 at EWR on the way I believe to NRT had a hard tail skid and grounded the plane for a month or 2. Boeing specialists had to come in to EWR and rebuild the tail of the a/c and bring in some major parts. Then you had the Japan Air Lines 747 in the 1980's that crashed into a mountain killing all but a few on the flight due to a bulkhead failure blamed on a faulty repair after a hard tail skid a few years before.
Let us hope the damage is only minor with this Ryanair a/c, but more important is figuring out ways to reduce the frequency of them. Perhaps some retraining of pilots may be in order as to takeoff procedures.


User currently offlineMD11Engineer From Germany, joined Oct 2003, 14030 posts, RR: 62
Reply 9, posted (6 years 2 weeks 5 days 13 hours ago) and read 3510 times:

Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 8):
Tail skids can be serious problems. Sometimes they may just be scraped paint and at other times it can be major structural damage. It was about 3 years ago that a CO 777 at EWR on the way I believe to NRT had a hard tail skid and grounded the plane for a month or 2. Boeing specialists had to come in to EWR and rebuild the tail of the a/c and bring in some major parts. Then you had the Japan Air Lines 747 in the 1980's that crashed into a mountain killing all but a few on the flight due to a bulkhead failure blamed on a faulty repair after a hard tail skid a few years before.
Let us hope the damage is only minor with this Ryanair a/c, but more important is figuring out ways to reduce the frequency of them. Perhaps some retraining of pilots may be in order as to takeoff procedures.

LTBEWR, were are talking about TAIL STRIKES. A TAILSKID is a structural part designed to protect the aircraft in case of a tail strike.

Jan

[Edited 2008-09-12 04:22:31]

User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 10, posted (6 years 2 weeks 4 days 22 hours ago) and read 3222 times:



Quoting MD11Engineer (Reply 7):
Tailstrikes have a potential danger, damage to the rear pressure bulkhead, which can lead to an explosive decompression and as a result possible damage to the control runs to the tail flight controls.

I thought that's why we had blowout doors. After the DC-10 exposed this potential failure mode, I don't think any design since then has been vulnerable to this particular failure.

Tom.


User currently offline28L28L From Australia, joined Nov 2005, 459 posts, RR: 0
Reply 11, posted (6 years 2 weeks 4 days 7 hours ago) and read 3034 times:

What was the reg. # of FR208?

Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
NZ 737 Returns To AKL After Take-off posted Wed Nov 9 2005 03:39:31 by Jafa39
Why Did KL 871 Return To AMS After Take Off? posted Wed Apr 4 2007 09:11:22 by Deaphen
KQ Aircraft Returning To Airport After Take-off posted Thu Nov 6 2003 15:33:13 by Nflippa
Avro Jet Came Back To Brussels After Take-off posted Thu Aug 22 2002 19:25:04 by Pressclub
KLM 747 Returns To Schiphol Short After Take Off posted Tue Nov 28 2006 11:32:31 by Boeing777/747
AA Flt.167 Returns To NYC Shortly After Take-off! posted Mon Feb 23 2004 18:52:25 by UA777222
Observed Today: A319 Gear Down 11km After Take Off posted Sat Dec 29 2007 04:20:09 by Umfolozi
CO 1422 MSY-IAH Returns To MSY After 1:47 In Air posted Mon May 28 2007 20:01:48 by Tom in NO
OS/Austrian Returns To JFK After Smoke In Cockpit posted Fri May 11 2007 10:11:24 by BHXDTW
2 Nautical Mile After Take-off: Height Of 737? posted Sat Apr 14 2007 19:00:56 by Varig767