Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Future Airport Design  
User currently offlinePlanenutzTB From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 256 posts, RR: 1
Posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 9817 times:

I would welcome some feedback and discussion regarding airport design. My wife is an architectural student working on her masters degree. For her masters paper she will design an airport for a medium size city of a million people. This is exciting for me as an aviation enthusiasts, as I can help my wife with her project.

Questions for discussion:

How does local culture impact airport design? For example, Denver’s airport has the shape of the Rocky Mountains. What are other examples of local culture impacting airport design?

How will the future of airline economics impact airport design? Will the focus on hub and spoke continue or more point to point? Will trend be smaller planes and more frequent flights, or larger planes with less frequency?

What are some of the current airport design issues do you think can be improved in future airport design?

I would appreciate all feedback and discussion.


I am extraordinarily patient, provided I get my own way in the end.
40 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineMobflyer From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1209 posts, RR: 4
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 9785 times:



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):

You raise many good questions for discussion. A lot of your questions depend on the demographics, location, and propensities of the local market. A city of a million people (I presume you mean MSA population) in the midwest will not garner as much service as one in Florida - typically at least.

I know of a couple examples where the local area has atleast some bearing on design or appointment of the facilites. In OKC, I believe I've seen very pictures of large murals in the new concourse with various celeberties from the state. Here in MOB, we have a lighthouse replica in terminal.

As for the larger planes/smaller planes less/more frequency question... depends solely on the market. Tourist markets will see larger planes with less frequency, because they need not the frequency, and the larger planes allow for a lower CASM, better matching the RASM that most leisure markets generate. An interrior business oriented market can economically support more frequency via RJs, etc.

If you get to invent the situation (city) then please tell us so we may help you more. If you are assigned a situation (ala a replacement airport, etc) please tell us as well.

Have a good one!
Josh


User currently offlineBrianDromey From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 3901 posts, RR: 9
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 9765 times:

Wow, this is an interesting question!

Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):
medium size city of a million people.



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):
How will the future of airline economics impact airport design? Will the focus on hub and spoke continue or more point to point? Will trend be smaller planes and more frequent flights, or larger planes with less frequency?

A city of size will never support much more than regional jets to major hubs and selected P2P services by LCC's. With this in mind I think it would be a good idea to have the arrivals and departure areas on one level, maybe having a relatively deep terminal with a 'normal' concourse for ticketing/check-in, baggage claim behind this (i.e. on an central longitudinal axis) the boarding areas behind this, connected to the concourse via security screening areas.
The advantage to the RJ operators would be ground level boarding, without need for abridges, just ramps/stairs etc. LCCs could use the ramps as well and use both the front and rear doors, passengers could get from aircraft to taxi/carpark relatively quickly. The single story should be relatively cheap to build too, and offer easy ways to expand in the future.

Just my two cents.

Brian.



Next flights: MAN-ORK-LHR(EI)-MAN(BD); MAN-LHR(BD)-ORK (EI); DUB-ZRH-LAX (LX) LAX-YYZ (AC) YYZ-YHZ-LHR(AC)-DUB(BD)
User currently offlineAirportPlan From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 469 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 15 hours ago) and read 9718 times:

[quote=PlanenutzTB,reply=0]Questions for discussion:

How does local culture impact airport design? For example, Denver's airport has the shape of the Rocky Mountains. What are other examples of local culture impacting airport design?

Local culture is a HUGE factor in planning airport today. Many airports are "themed" to reflect their area.

How will the future of airline economics impact airport design? Will the focus on hub and spoke continue or more point to point? Will trend be smaller planes and more frequent flights, or larger planes with less frequency?

You will always have hub airports but there will be fewer of them in the future. Depending on the airports location in the world and the points being served you will always have narrowbody and widebody aircraft on certain routes.

What are some of the current airport design issues do you think can be improved in future airport design?

The biggest issues in airport planning today are cost, concessions, Green Issues (Energy Savings, Sustainability, etc.) and surface connections (i.e. road, rail). While many airports operators would like to have a terminal that makes an architectual statement. In todays world that is being tossed out the window on more and more projects because of cost.

quote]


User currently offlineMobflyer From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1209 posts, RR: 4
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 14 hours ago) and read 9687 times:



Quoting BrianDromey (Reply 2):
A city of size will never support much more than regional jets to major hubs and selected P2P services by LCC's.

I respectively disagree. Per the US Census, the following cities have MSA populations between roughly 750,000 people and 1,250,000 as of 2007.

Memphis, TN-MS-AR
Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN
Richmond, VA
Oklahoma City, OK
Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, CT
Buffalo-Niagara Falls, NY
Birmingham-Hoover, AL
Salt Lake City, UT
Raleigh-Cary, NC
Rochester, NY
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA
Tucson, AZ
Tulsa, OK
Honolulu, HI
Fresno, CA
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT
Albany-Schenectady-Troy, NY
New Haven-Milford, CT
Dayton, OH
Albuquerque, NM
Omaha-Council Bluffs, NE-IA
Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ
Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, CA
Bakersfield, CA
Worcester, MA
Grand Rapids-Wyoming, MI
Baton Rouge, LA
El Paso, TX

Many of those support much more than you allude they could. (However atleast one doesn't have any significant service at al....)


User currently offlineBurkhard From Germany, joined Nov 2006, 4361 posts, RR: 2
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9594 times:

Over here in Europe, environmental issues are more important than anything else, just because they limit realization. If there is one detail where somebody else has a greener alternative, you are back at start and have lost ten years.

User currently offlineBrianDromey From Ireland, joined Dec 2006, 3901 posts, RR: 9
Reply 6, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9560 times:



Quoting Mobflyer (Reply 4):
I respectively disagree. Per the US Census, the following cities have MSA populations between roughly 750,000 people and 1,250,000 as of 2007.

I take your point that a few of these cities are what might be termed 'focus cities' or 'small hubs', but in general this is not the case.
I also misread the intention of the OP. I assumed the airport catered for 1m PAX as opposed to serving a city of 1M, which is obviously very different. I think in this situation a traditional twin level structure is more appropriate.

Architecturally, I think airports like IAD are successful, both the original and newer additions. They are bright, airy and have good views of the surrounding landscape and airfield, connection the passenger not only to their journey, but also the region through which they are travelling, eg STN. Vaulted or multi-contured roofs have also been used to great effect, particularly in Europe, for example ORK, LHR T5 and LTN. I feel they give an 'uplifting' feel to the building, again connecting the passenger to the wonder of flight.

Brian.



Next flights: MAN-ORK-LHR(EI)-MAN(BD); MAN-LHR(BD)-ORK (EI); DUB-ZRH-LAX (LX) LAX-YYZ (AC) YYZ-YHZ-LHR(AC)-DUB(BD)
User currently offlineOta1 From Germany, joined Apr 2008, 396 posts, RR: 0
Reply 7, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9561 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!



Quoting BrianDromey (Reply 2):
A city of size will never support much more than regional jets to major hubs and selected P2P services by LCC's

Sorry to call you wrong, but Frankfurt has some 700.000 inhabitants while FRA is the largest airport in Germany, one of the top 3 Airports in Europe and one oft the top 10 in the world....

I have to admit though that the region has way more inhabitants ... about 2.2 million

[Edited 2008-10-11 14:05:09]

User currently offlineBuyantUkhaa From Mongolia, joined May 2004, 2828 posts, RR: 3
Reply 8, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9548 times:



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):
How does local culture impact airport design?

Landside infrastructure (amongst many others). In the US and many other countries you'll need a very large car park and perhaps a motorway, in Europe (and any large metropole) you will need good public transport links (train, metro, tram), still a large car park and a motorway.

On a lighter note, when you design the toilet division within the terminal, Americans will prefer the disabled gents toilet to be part of the general gents toilet and the disabled ladies' toilet to be part of the general ladies' toilet. Europeans prefer the disabled people's toilet to be separate of both (argument being that most of the times the person taking care of the disabled person is his/her wife/husband. Just a detail I was told about when checking cruise ships for accessibility a few years ago.

Depending on the level of religiousness of the place where the airport is to be situated, you may want to include a worship room too (or several if more religions are present).



I scratch my head, therefore I am.
User currently offlineReality From United States of America, joined Apr 2007, 443 posts, RR: 0
Reply 9, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 9536 times:



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):
I would welcome some feedback and discussion regarding airport design.



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):
For her masters paper she will design an airport for a medium size city of a million people.

The size of the city doesn't mean much. It would be helpful if you could specify how many people the airport will be designed to handle per year. Also, what percentage will be domestic, and what percentage International? Will it be in the US or elsewhere? Knowing these things will make it easier to discuss with relevant comments.


User currently offlineBurj From United States of America, joined Nov 2007, 900 posts, RR: 4
Reply 10, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 9389 times:

Um...don't know if the OP was refering to U.S. airports only...

BUT off the top of my head LHE was designed to reflect historical local architecture and eschews the current trend of big steel and glass for a more "Mughal" esthetic:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allama_Iqbal_International_Airport
http://www.flickr.com/photos/naeemkhan/2371207307/
http://lahore.metblogs.com/tag/lahore-airport/
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Im...e:Allama_Iqbal_Airport,_Lahore.jpg

As for cultural influences on design.... In South Asian culture it is VERY common for the ENTIRE family (and I mean the entire EXTENDED family) to go to the airport to pick someone up or see them leave. I've been told that newer airport designs in South Asia have much larger pre-security (landside) areas for this reason.


User currently offlineMOBflyer From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 1209 posts, RR: 4
Reply 11, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 9368 times:



Quoting BrianDromey (Reply 6):
I take your point that a few of these cities are what might be termed 'focus cities' or 'small hubs', but in general this is not the case.

I should have been more specific. That is an inclusive list of cities that have an MSA of between roughly 750k and 1.25M. All but a couple of those airports are significant, if not hubs.


User currently offlineMHTripple7 From United States of America, joined Feb 2008, 1100 posts, RR: 8
Reply 12, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 9329 times:



Quoting Ota1 (Reply 7):
Sorry to call you wrong, but Frankfurt has some 700.000 inhabitants while FRA is the largest airport in Germany, one of the top 3 Airports in Europe and one oft the top 10 in the world....

That makes me want to cry lol. TPA has 4 million people MSA and we don't even have a daily flight to Europe. I suppose FRA is an excellent and well positioned airport to connect through though.

[Edited 2008-10-11 17:11:33]

User currently offlineCaspritz78 From Germany, joined Aug 2007, 518 posts, RR: 0
Reply 13, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 10 hours ago) and read 9297 times:

Also take security into account. You need a lot of space for the security checkpoint. Also the building should have a natural way of showing where to go. For example instead of going up for the gates it should slope down to guide you like water runs down a slope. Open space is also important. Takes off the stress. And of course enough space for restaurants and coffee shops.

User currently offlineUltimateDelta From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 2064 posts, RR: 6
Reply 14, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 9 hours ago) and read 9259 times:



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):
How does local culture impact airport design? For example, Denver’s airport has the shape of the Rocky Mountains. What are other examples of local culture impacting airport design?

This isn't so much an example of actual design, but at YVR there's lots of Inuit and Native American (or is it Canadian?) artwork.



Midwest Airlines- 1984-2010
User currently offlineDenverdanny From United States of America, joined Sep 2007, 256 posts, RR: 0
Reply 15, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 9152 times:

I think this is almost too broad of a topic to nail down. There are so many aspects to look at.

Some people here seem to be talking a lot about themes in airport design, like here in Denver with the mountain/plains/wildlife theming of the terminal design. So there is THAT cultural impact on design. I really think that any designer should be thinking about those things, like symbolism, automatically. I mean, that stuff goes without saying in the design profession.

I think it may be more interesting to think about cultural impacts on functional design layout though. For instance, here in the US we are a more auto dependent society, and that no doubt impacts the design of our airports. We also have more space, less strict environmental laws, and political issues are not as much of an impediment as in Japan or parts of Europe. In Japan they have built a few airports offshore because it's just easier.

It's anybody's guess at whether smaller planes or large planes or whatever changes will come in the future, and how those are integrated into the design. Probably the future of airport design will have to make airports easily adaptable to the uncertainty of changing needs. The future lies in commonality and ease of interchangeability of parts. For some time this has been happening in the housing industry, and I think it carries over into other areas.

Here in the US, I believe the future of airport design will have to incorporate integrated travel, such as connections to a national high speed train network, possibly in terminal. The Japanese have already been successful at this. Also, airport design seems to be moving towards multiple runways that do not intersect and that offer a number of free flight paths for arrivals and departures. Witness what is happening with the reorganization of Ohare, Dulles, and that which was done at Denver.

I don't know much about the airports in countries like India. I think it would be interesting to look at them as a comparison to US airports. That might allow someone to see some of the cultural differences that are inherent in the designs. Less autos in India at the moment... how does that impact the design. Are they building new airports and what do those look like.

I used to draw airports as a kid. I still have many of the drawings I did. It is interesting to see that the drawing I did look a lot like what airports that are being built today kind of look like, at least as far as the radiating runways go.

I think another interesting thing to look at might be what the government or designer is trying to impart with the design, and how that is connected or disconnected from the reality of the users and the culture there. I guess I'm thinking of designs in ex communist countries or whatever where the design of the architecture was supposed to suggest something about the government there. I'm not all that familiar with European airports, but I can think of the train stations in Italy that maybe were meant to impart something about Fascism, but are devoid of cultural elements.

I'd kind of like to get into this profession. I just finished my undergrad design degree.

[Edited 2008-10-11 19:32:27]

User currently offlineYXXMIKE From Canada, joined Apr 2008, 308 posts, RR: 0
Reply 16, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 5 hours ago) and read 8663 times:

Great thread!

An excellent example of an airport with a local theme is YVR. For those that have been through YVR will know exactly what I mean! Lots of water, fish and the general feeling of what British Columbia has to offer.

As regarding the latter question, frequency or capacity well that's an argument that will likely battle on airliners for decades to come! Try and build an airport that uses a "low growth" scenario for the next 5 years based on current global economic conditions. By using this type of scenario you will want to go on the basis of smaller aircraft with some frequency but leave the end of the terminal(s) with a slightly more open plan as to allow future growth on the next economic upswing. This will allow for an airport to be built a bit cheaper, but doesn't restrict its future. I am a firm believer in building with the future in mind!

Anyway, just my 2 cents!

Mike


User currently offlineMighkal From Hong Kong, joined Oct 2005, 14 posts, RR: 0
Reply 17, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 4 hours ago) and read 8506 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

How about a non-conventional airport that can offer convenience to travellers.
Nowadays, working your way thru an airport just to board a plane is stressfull. You travel 40km three hours in advance to get to an airport, hope to get nice srvc from the indifferent check-in staff, then the immigrations, TSAs, long line-ups... and walk another 400m with your carry-ons to get to the gate all sweated.
Wouldn't it be nice if your friend can drop you off directly at the apron of a nearby airport just minutes before departure. Then have someone from Starbucks serve you coffee and do all the paperwork before boarding. I know this sounds a little extreme, but designers and regulators should start tackling this issue. Airports nowadays are getting overly complicated for travellers.


User currently offlineHmmmm... From Canada, joined May 1999, 2104 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 8378 times:

Please tell your wife to put carpet on the floor of the terminal building, low lighting, and terracotta colors. But the carpet is number one. It muffles sounds, makes everything more soothing and quiet, and more relaxing than the hard polished concrete floors that were the standard in the 60s, and which are everywhere today. My favorite terminal building was always the old TPA and it was dimly lit, like a French restaurant, with carpet and dark colors. Totally '70s, but it worked for me.


An optimist robs himself of the joy of being pleasantly surprised
User currently offlineFlyDeltaJets87 From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 19, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 8254 times:



Quoting PlanenutzTB (Thread starter):

Best advice I can give - Don't just plan the airport for now - plan it for the future. Many projects are flawed because they underestimate growth and such. Look at how many airports - even fairly new ones - have had to redesign and rebuild just to accomadate the A380. Not saying your airport will see the A380 but think in terms of growth. Your airport may only see RJs now but could see 737 or 757 service in the near future if economic growth in the region is high so things like gate space with enough wing clearance and jetways that can reach a 757 will be needed but won't be available if designed with only RJ operations in mind.

Quoting MHTripple7 (Reply 12):
That makes me want to cry lol. TPA has 4 million people MSA and we don't even have a daily flight to Europe. I suppose FRA is an excellent and well positioned airport to connect through though.

TPA has at least British Airways to London. FRA also serves as a hub for many passengers while TPA does not. The Cincinnati metro area is smaller than TPA yet CVG is a larger airport than Tampa too simply because CVG is a hub for DL.

Quoting Mighkal (Reply 17):
Wouldn't it be nice if your friend can drop you off directly at the apron of a nearby airport just minutes before departure. Then have someone from Starbucks serve you coffee and do all the paperwork before boarding. I know this sounds a little extreme, but designers and regulators should start tackling this issue. Airports nowadays are getting overly complicated for travellers.

You can do this already. It's called corporate travel.  Smile Buy a BizJet.

Quoting BrianDromey (Reply 2):
The advantage to the RJ operators would be ground level boarding, without need for abridges, just ramps/stairs etc. LCCs could use the ramps as well and use both the front and rear doors, passengers could get from aircraft to taxi/carpark relatively quickly. The single story should be relatively cheap to build too, and offer easy ways to expand in the future.

Here in the US, even many RJ flights still board and deplane via jetbridge. It's not 100% and some airports even have a mix of both but sadly being able to walk out on the tarmac is becoming a more rare experience.  frown 


User currently offlineZRH From Switzerland, joined Nov 1999, 5565 posts, RR: 37
Reply 20, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 8222 times:



Quoting BrianDromey (Reply 2):
A city of size will never support much more than regional jets to major hubs and selected P2P services by LCC's



Quoting Ota1 (Reply 7):
Sorry to call you wrong, but Frankfurt has some 700.000 inhabitants while FRA is the largest airport in Germany, one of the top 3 Airports in Europe and one oft the top 10 in the world....

Or another example: the city of Zurich has about 400 000 inhabitants with its suburbs 1 mi but the airport is much bigger (2008 about 22 mi passengers with a lot of intercont flights). So the size of the city is not always really relevant.


User currently offlineBen175 From Australia, joined Jul 2008, 656 posts, RR: 0
Reply 21, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 8215 times:



Quote:
Here in the US, even many RJ flights still board and deplane via jetbridge. It's not 100% and some airports even have a mix of both but sadly being able to walk out on the tarmac is becoming a more rare experience.

LMFAO here in Perth, you've got a huge chance of boarding a 767 on the tarmac these days. My friend has been traveling to Brisbane every week for the past few months and not once has he boarded or disembarked the QF 767 he flies through an aerobridge!


User currently offlineAirportPlan From United States of America, joined Jan 2004, 469 posts, RR: 3
Reply 22, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 8170 times:



Quoting Hmmmm... (Reply 18):
Please tell your wife to put carpet on the floor of the terminal building, low lighting, and terracotta colors. But the carpet is number one. It muffles sounds, makes everything more soothing and quiet, and more relaxing than the hard polished concrete floors that were the standard in the 60s, and which are everywhere today. My favorite terminal building was always the old TPA and it was dimly lit, like a French restaurant, with carpet and dark colors. Totally '70s, but it worked for me.

Carpet is not used in cooridors of many large airport particularly at hub airports because it wears out due to the high traffic levels. Terazzo is prefered becuse it can be made in any color or pattern and it will last for 100+ years if properly maintained.


User currently offlineMig21UMD From Australia, joined Feb 2005, 262 posts, RR: 1
Reply 23, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 2 hours ago) and read 8107 times:

Hi there,

Just yesterday I stumbled across some news regarding Zagreb airport Croatia (population 1 million) and the winner of the terminal building. It will be able to handle 5 million pax per year and is hoped it will allow Zagreb airport to become a major hub for south east Europe. The following links are for Zagreb Airport website and another website which show pictures of models of all the entrants.

http://www.zagreb-airport.hr/en/news/show/234/index.aspx

In Croatian only but the design models are good to see:

http://www.d-a-z.hr/?sec=natjecajirezultat&id=37

The winner:

http://www.d-a-z.hr/files/natjecaji_rezultati-kincl_1-1223027321.jpg
http://www.d-a-z.hr/files/natjecaji_rezultati-kincl_2-1223027321.jpg
http://www.d-a-z.hr/files/natjecaji_rezultati-kincl_3-1223027321.jpg
http://www.d-a-z.hr/files/natjecaji_rezultati-kincl_4-1223027321.jpg



Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you long to return
User currently offlineBOSSAN From United States of America, joined Aug 2004, 255 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (5 years 6 months 2 weeks 1 day 1 hour ago) and read 7939 times:

One million people is a respectable metropolitan area in the United States. You cannot count on it sustaining any sort of hub operation in today's economy, but it should get consistent service to hub airports with narrowbody or regional jets. Thus, no accommodation for transiting passengers is necessary, and ease of departure and arrival are the main considerations.

Assuming the terminal is being built from scratch and there are no particularly odd constraints on the size and shape of the terminal, a single linear concourse attached to the terminal affords reasonably short walking distances to the gates from a central security checkpoint with a small land footprint. (Plus it's difficult for passengers to get lost!)

The main terminals at PVD, MHT, SNA and AUS were all built in the 1990s to serve moderate flows of O&D passengers. The terminals are of broadly similar designs, with 150,000 to 600,000 square feet of space overall, 10-25 gates along a single linear concourse and one or two central security checkpoints. DTW's new North Terminal has a very similar design, as do the two terminals at ONT and terminals A and B at SJC.


25 KiwiRob : If you want an excellent example of an airport that services 1 million people, that is a major domestic hub and the main point of entry into a country
26 BooDog : When it comes to runway layouts for a smaller market (a 2-runway airport) ABI is by far the best laid out. Two parallel runways. Where 35R ends, runwa
27 Caspritz78 : No carpet. It is filthy and after a year it looks disgusting.
28 Hmmmm... : Of course carpets get dirty. That is why they don't use them. Brilliant observation. Unfortunately, they also do wonders for sound and provide a very
29 CanadianNorth : I would say size doesn't really mean much either. For example, I come from a city of only about 23,000 people and during the summer we have regularly
30 Tonystan : Architecture has always been a passion of mine and combined with aviation Im in heaven. To me I feel a few important factors need to be examined. 1/ M
31 Cloudy : Economics is a huge consideration. Many communities in the US have made airport improvements only to see traffic chased away by the fees increased to
32 Jamincan : I also think the linear terminal is a good design for O&D markets. One additional benefit is that the linear design is easily expanded once construct
33 CXfirst : I love the SK A340 in the picture, so realistic! I think the most important aspect in a modern building today (apart from the fact that it works cohe
34 A333TS : Today one of the most important thing that people, governments around the world are looking at reduction of energy, green house effects, building the
35 Nomadic : I agree. YVR has incorporated elements of the Pacific Northwest, First Nation culture and spectacular views. A smaller community with a beautiful air
36 Threepoint : You've pretty much described YXY and the misleading fact about that city is that it's a large seasonal tourist destination with almost all of those a
37 Post contains links AV8orWALK : Well about 5 years ago, the guy in this article thought that "Starrports" would be the airport design of the future. I remember discussing the pros an
38 FlyASAGuy2005 : I always wondered how TPA couldn't support even s subsidized flight to the middle east.
39 SeattleFlyer : This is a great point as are many others here. In considering the growth in size and number of aircraft for terminal, taxiway and runway designs, one
40 Post contains links BOSSAN : It is always possible to overplan for the future. I have a copy of an MIT class project from the late 1960s presenting a plan to solve Boston's futur
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
Airport Design: Local Pax Vs. Connections posted Sat Aug 23 2008 09:48:12 by Cubsrule
Revolutionary Airport Design posted Mon Jan 12 2004 20:03:53 by Twalives
Eco-friendly New Airport Design Theory posted Fri May 30 2003 21:51:10 by USFlyer MSP
DFW's Future Airport Train posted Wed Apr 3 2002 05:38:19 by Blink182
Future Airport Projects? posted Sun Dec 23 2001 08:02:58 by IndianicWorld
Airport Design Question posted Mon Feb 19 2001 02:23:11 by Cba
Airport design posted Thu Mar 18 1999 04:27:11 by Canadair Challe
JFK Airport Future posted Fri Sep 12 2008 10:13:26 by Planetime
Future Of St Petersburg Airport, Russia posted Wed Sep 10 2008 05:02:39 by DocPepz
Future Outcome Of San Jose Intl Airport (KSJC) posted Fri Aug 22 2008 14:04:39 by Apollo13