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Will All 737's Have To Be Grounded For Checks?  
User currently offlineBeaucaire From Syria, joined Sep 2003, 5252 posts, RR: 25
Posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 5217 times:

reading this Boeing service notice it seems the fuel-pumps in many 737 models could run dry and potentially cause an ignition of the center tank..
That directive will cause major disruptions to operations with most airlines ?


http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory...b39/$FILE/2008-24-51_Emergency.pdf

or use :
http://www.airweb.faa.gov/Regulatory...FF9BE8625750600164B39?OpenDocument

[Edited 2008-11-19 22:53:06]


Please respect animals - don't eat them...
10 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 1, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 2 hours ago) and read 5149 times:



Quoting Beaucaire (Thread starter):
That directive will cause major disruptions to operations with most airlines ?

It's not as bad as it may first appear. The AD only applies to those aircraft that have autoshutoff (SB 737-28A1206) but have not yet installed SB 737-28A1248 (or the production equivalent). Since I don't think the compliance period for 737-28A1206 is over yet, the problem probably doesn't apply to the entire fleet. The problem also doesn't appear to apply to airplanes with the production version of 737-28A1206, which has been around for a few years now so the most recent airplanes shouldn't be effected.

For that part of the fleet it does apply to, they have 48 hours (minimum) to do the test, or else deactivate the center left pump. You can still dispatch with that pump inactive as a 10-day MEL item (non-ETOPS), so really they've got 12 days to do the inspections.

If I were an airline, I'd start on the ETOPS scheduled airplanes tonight and tomorrow night, then start working my way through the rest of the fleet over the next 10 days. It will be challenging, but probably not crippling (not as bad as the American Airlines MD-80 fiasco).

Tom.


User currently offlineBartonsayswhat From Canada, joined Oct 2007, 434 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 2 days 1 hour ago) and read 5015 times:



Quoting Tdscanuck (Reply 1):

very well said. also alot of a/c will be RONing (north america) right now, so they'll get a good crack at it. it doesn't seem like the testing would take very long, provided no fault was found.
we'll just have to wait and see what tomorrow brings in the way of delays.

my company's not flying the 737NG  biggrin 


User currently offlineTrex8 From United States of America, joined Nov 2002, 4692 posts, RR: 14
Reply 3, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4617 times:
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Ot but whatever happened to the bolt/nut problem and the CI 738 which burned up, has the final accident report come out and weren;'t there reports of new planes with problems too, what did Boeing do to fix that issue?

User currently offlineSWISSER From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 4, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 13 hours ago) and read 4587 times:

At least they are on the case!
Thats the best thing for us to know!


User currently offlineArffguy From United States of America, joined Sep 2005, 157 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 8 hours ago) and read 4307 times:

A large number of short range flights are made without the center tank even being used. So deactivating one of the center tank pumps would not matter.


Time to spare, go by air.
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 6, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 1 day 3 hours ago) and read 4062 times:



Quoting Trex8 (Reply 3):
Ot but whatever happened to the bolt/nut problem and the CI 738 which burned up, has the final accident report come out and weren;'t there reports of new planes with problems too, what did Boeing do to fix that issue?

There was an interim report...I don't recall ever seeing a final. An AD went out within a few days of figuring out what went wrong in that case requiring all operators to inspect for proper torque and installation of the slat downstops. That should have killed the problem right there.

Tom.


User currently offlineAmerican 767 From United States of America, joined May 1999, 3735 posts, RR: 12
Reply 7, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 14 hours ago) and read 3776 times:
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Quoting Arffguy (Reply 5):
A large number of short range flights are made without the center tank even being used. So deactivating one of the center tank pumps would not matter.

Yes, but one aircraft can be assigned on a longer flight after completing a short flight assignment. For example, a Delta 737-800 completes a short flight ORD-ATL and a couple of hours later it is assigned on a longer ATL-SAN segment.
All major operators of the 737-NG Series in the United States, AA, CO, DL and WN assign those aircraft on long segments. So they all have to check the center fuel tanks of their aircraft.

Ben Soriano



Ben Soriano
User currently offlineCubsrule From United States of America, joined May 2004, 22723 posts, RR: 20
Reply 8, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 3659 times:



Quoting American 767 (Reply 7):
All major operators of the 737-NG Series in the United States, AA, CO, DL and WN assign those aircraft on long segments. So they all have to check the center fuel tanks of their aircraft.

 checkmark But if need be, they can deactivate the pump on some aircraft and keep them on short missions. It's not something you'd want to do for years and years, but it would be for a maximum of 10 days.



I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
User currently offlineAirframeAS From United States of America, joined Feb 2004, 14150 posts, RR: 24
Reply 9, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 12 hours ago) and read 3620 times:

I printed out the AD for review as I am going out of town.... Too bad the 737 has AD for now.


A Safe Flight Begins With Quality Maintenance On The Ground.
User currently offlineTdscanuck From Canada, joined Jan 2006, 12709 posts, RR: 80
Reply 10, posted (5 years 8 months 1 week 7 hours ago) and read 3482 times:



Quoting American 767 (Reply 7):
All major operators of the 737-NG Series in the United States, AA, CO, DL and WN assign those aircraft on long segments. So they all have to check the center fuel tanks of their aircraft.

You don't take any range penalty for deactivating one center pump, just an ETOPS hit. Anybody using 737's for non-ETOPS (which is most of them) has 12 days (2 days per the AD and then 10 on the MEL).

Tom.


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