Sponsor Message:
Civil Aviation Forum
My Starred Topics | Profile | New Topic | Forum Index | Help | Search 
Cabin Door Operations In Commercial Aircraft...  
User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Posted (13 years 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 11709 times:

Can someone tell me the procedures F/A's have to follow from Boarding to Arrival in terms of Cabin door operations. Like when and how do they arm/disarm a door? How do they know when to arm/disarm...Does the captain tell them when through the intercom? And any other operations regarding these doors (most specifically Airbus models)...
Also how do they open the door during arrival, and close it during departure? I have the wierdest fascination with aircraft doors hehehe.

Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Stephan Tophoven


Thanx

Arrivederci
Olympic A-340

30 replies: All unread, showing first 25:
 
User currently offlineEnglandair From United Kingdom, joined Oct 2000, 2228 posts, RR: 3
Reply 1, posted (13 years 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 11616 times:

I think they're really interesting too, so you're not the only weirdo!

I've heard the captain announce to the FAs (over the speakers) something like "Cabin crew to arm doors and cross check", but i don't know if that's normal.

If I may, I'd like to add a question:
When doors are opened (eg during bording), are other doors still armed (armed is when the emergency slides can be inflated by opening an exit, right?).
If not, how are passengers supposed to evacuate if the need arrises?

Cheers,
Jamie.


User currently offline777gk From United States of America, joined Jun 2000, 1641 posts, RR: 18
Reply 2, posted (13 years 4 weeks 14 hours ago) and read 11611 times:

Hope the following helps, I've never actually flown an Airbus aircraft, but from what I saw when I sat in the exit row on an AZ 321 last summer, I could tell you a little:

Pushback:
Doors are closed by giving the handle a bit of a tug on most AI aircraft. The power assist kicks in and closes the door. The handle is then pulled down to the locked position. Then the captain issues the All Call, which is normally "Flight attendants, prepare your doors for departure and cross-check". The slide is then armed at this point by either flipping a switch and sometimes inserting a key or something, or the girt bar can manually attached to the floor of the aircraft. Either way is fine, most newer designs are automatic. Then, the flight attendant must cross-check the door opposite their own, which usually means going across the aisle to make sure it is armed. Then, you are good to go.

Flight:
The door stays armed in flight.

Arrival:
Once at the station, and the Captain has given the "OK", the girt bar is removed from the floor manually or automatically. The F/A checks the station across again, and if they are ok, usually the F/A will give the gate agent a thumbs-up or crack the door to indicate it is disarmed. Then, the gate agent will complete the process and open up the door for passenger deplaning.

I have some old Delta A-310 Flight Attendant Training packets in my study. I would be happy to scan them in for you some time this weekend if you would like to see them. If you do, just send your e-mail to giantsfan8198@home.com and post a message on this thread that you sent the e-mail.

Gene


User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 3, posted (13 years 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 11579 times:

777GK,
I would be VERY grateful if you could scan me that manual. My email is maralbis@gate.net
Thanx for all the info guyz I really appreciate it...btw I flew on the Airbus A-321 (Alitalia) and flew in the exit row 3 times. I noticed how the doors were closed etc, I just didn't know exactly what they were doing.

Arrivederci
Olympic A-340


User currently offlineILUV767 From United States of America, joined May 2000, 3141 posts, RR: 8
Reply 4, posted (13 years 4 weeks 12 hours ago) and read 11571 times:

Alrighty...here is the jist of it for United on the A320.

The door remains open during the boarding process. After the purser has been given a copy of the pax manifest, and when everyone is safely on board, and all of the luggage has been stowed, the CSR working that flight, will make their final announcements regarding the flight, and walk outside of the aircraft, and close the door.

On the A320, the door is released, and slide into its resting place. Once in place, the handle is pushed downward, and the door is secure.

After the jetway/stairs has been pulled back, the flight attendant at that door will make an announcement over the p.a. that says "Flight Attendants, arm doors for departure." Then, he/she will move the slide arming handle downward. In the photo above, it is the yellow handle towards the left of the door. The door is now armed.

BTW: 777gk...Its not the captain...its the f/a at the door who will announce when it is safe to arm/de-arm the doors.

On the 737, a very simliar process occures, as I wrote above, but a small girt bar is latched down onto the floor. To de-arm the door, you simply remove the girt bar from the floor, and place it on the hooks at the base of the slide pack.

On most airlines, it is a requirement that the 737 doors are "cracked" thus symbolizing that they are safe to open. This way the slide wont be blown accedently from crews trying to open the door from teh outside. On the 757, 767, 747, and the 777, as well with all of the airbus products...the slide will disarm itself when the handle is moved, making it safe to open the door.


User currently offlineAirnewzealand From New Zealand, joined Oct 2000, 2541 posts, RR: 6
Reply 5, posted (13 years 4 weeks 10 hours ago) and read 11541 times:

On all flights the lead FA will come over the speaker and say "Flight attendants please prepare for take-off, and ensure cross-check is complete!" Somehting like that.

Cheers
mikey


User currently offlineFLY777UAL From United States of America, joined May 1999, 4512 posts, RR: 3
Reply 6, posted (13 years 4 weeks 9 hours ago) and read 11536 times:

Some interesting notes regarding UA's procedures:

Doors are NEVER cracked upon arrival. CSR's and FA's coordinate visually on the status of the door.

After closing and arming a door on the 727, 737, and A320/319, FA's must check all around the door to ensure that there is no false latching (when the door is armed, but not properly closed). A visual check is all that is necessary, making sure that the inside edges of the door and the fuselage are even and line up.

F L Y 7 7 7 U A L


User currently offlineOlympic A-340 From United States of America, joined Apr 2000, 780 posts, RR: 10
Reply 7, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 11500 times:

Thanx guyz for all this information...
One other question how do the doors on the 747 get armed?...I have seen this little "box" next to the door handle is that the arming mechanism? Also is it hard to open the large door of the 747?

Arrivederci
Olympic A-340


User currently offlineWorldTraveller From Germany, joined Jun 1999, 624 posts, RR: 5
Reply 8, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 17 hours ago) and read 11491 times:

The standard operating procedure at BA are the following announcements from the flight deck made during taxi:

"Cabin Crew: Doors to automatic and crosscheck" (before take-off)

"Cabin Crew: Doors to manual and crosscheck" (after roll-out)


Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Robert Maturski



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Samuel P. Cooper



Click for large version
Click here for full size photo!

Photo © Richard Austen



Best regards
the WorldTraveller


User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 9, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 11481 times:

The 747 door has a hydraulic (might actually be pneumatic) mechanism that allows smooth operation. For all main deck doors, when the door is set to manual and the handle turned, the door seal automatically disengages and pushes the door outward provided pressurization seals are not active. Those can be overridden by the cockpit, or manually by the door using the crash axe on the window. Slide deployment is automatic and immediate, with tragic consequences for any poor sod standing on the other side!

User currently offlineWing From Turkey, joined Oct 2000, 1555 posts, RR: 24
Reply 10, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 11476 times:

Englandair,its not the captain who announces the cabin crew to arm or disarm the slides,its the cabin chief who says it.Captain and the F/O are already too busy with their job and C.crew is responsible from the cabin.On departure chief attendant bring a cabin inspection report to the cockpit and they go ahead prepare their cabin.That when they arm the slides.On arrival when aircraft completely stops and capt turns off the fasten seatbelt lights they disarm their slides and crosscheck.Procedures may vary but the important thing is the slides must be armed whenever the pax on board and plane has no connection to a bridge,stair etc. incase of possible evacution.


Widen your world
User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 11, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 16 hours ago) and read 11468 times:

Actually Wing, you are incorrect there. While individual airline policies may vary, Boeing's reccomendation is for the COMMANDER to order arming and disarming of doors based upon his judgement. This may be done by making an actual announcement himself, or by a prearranged signal to the crew. Cabin crew merely facilitate the actions, but the commander has to initiate them at all times.

Additionally, there are policies for certain situations on ground. For example, if an aircraft is being refuelled while passengers are loading - a minimum of 2 full size exit doors must be armed or open and pax are not permitted to fasten seatbelts.


User currently offlineTriStar From Belgium, joined Oct 1999, 848 posts, RR: 1
Reply 12, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11463 times:

I have to second what B747-437B said. It depends on airline policy as to who initiates the process of arming and disarming the doors, as in who tells the cabin crew - something that would happen over the PA system.
With us, it is the captain who makes the calls. (S)he may pass this task on to the F/O, but at any rate, the order will come from the flight deck.

Best regards,

TriStar.


User currently offlineWing From Turkey, joined Oct 2000, 1555 posts, RR: 24
Reply 13, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11459 times:

Well B747-437B,I am B737 First Officer and I never heard any of our commanders making an announcement about that.This is completely the cabin chief's responsibility.When the parking brake is set and fasten seatbelts off(a single chime sounds in the cabin)they disarm their slides and wait for permission to open the doors.We have more important things to do in the cockpit then thinking about the slides.So as we both agree there may be policy differences I can advise you to go and check your source once again I am sure you can get it this time.And agree with you on the refueling part also.


Widen your world
User currently offlineSK A340 From Sweden, joined Mar 2000, 845 posts, RR: 2
Reply 14, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11448 times:

I once flew on an Air France 744 from LAX to CDG. When the plane stopped at the gate in Paris all flightattendants took place in front of one door each (on the port side of the main cabin). Someone said a short message (in french) over the intercom and then the crew did something with the door they stood at (pushed a button or pulled a handel or something) exactly at the same time. Even on the doors that remained closed during the disembark of the plane.
What was that?  Confused

/SK A340


User currently offlineB747-437B From , joined Dec 1969, posts, RR:
Reply 15, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11448 times:

Actually Wing, with all due respect I think we mean the same thing but are saying it different ways.  Smile

My comment was "This may be done by making an actual announcement himself, or by a prearranged signal to the crew. Cabin crew merely facilitate the actions, but the commander has to initiate them at all times."

Your comment was "When the parking brake is set and fasten seatbelts off(a single chime sounds in the cabin)they disarm their slides and wait for permission to open the doors."

The single chime sounding in the cabin is the prearranged signal I was referring to. The signal is initiated by the commander - while the cabin crew merely facilitate the action. The commander can always countermand these standing orders in advance, and hence ultimate responsibility rests with him.

We are on the same page here, so lets not argue the semantics!  Smile


User currently onlineCrosswind From United Kingdom, joined Nov 2000, 2597 posts, RR: 58
Reply 16, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11449 times:
Support Airliners.net - become a First Class Member!

In the UK,
On most airlines the Cabin Crew No. 1 gives the command to arm the doors for departure command over the P/A, as the aircraft pushes-back or moves forward under it's own power. This is because the command to arm the doors requires no specialist judgement - the aircraft is moving and the flight is about to begin - arm the doors.

On arrival it is the flightcrew that make the announcement to disarm the doors, as it is their judgement that the aircraft has made a normal arrival, there are no problems and it is safe to disarm the doors as the aircraft taxis in. The Cabin Crew don't have the information the flightcrew have to make a decision that it is safe to disarm the doors, as some emergency situations may not immediately be apparent to those in the cabin, high brake temperatures etc...

Also, several airlines keep these announcements fairly brief, as the Cabin Crew have obviously been trained in terms of crosschecking etc and the P/As are simply;
"Cabin Crew doors for departure"
"Cabin Crew doors for arrival"

Regards
CROSSWIND


User currently offlineRootsgirl From Canada, joined Mar 2001, 530 posts, RR: 2
Reply 17, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 15 hours ago) and read 11446 times:

All airlines have diferent procedures, however, they don't vary from the actual function. As youknow the reason doors are armed is to activate the slide/slideraft.
According to the aircraft some slides are manual (gert bar insert) and some are automatic.

All doors that are automatic also have a "power assist" meaning that if you had to open the door in the "armed mode as soon as you pull up on the door handle the power assist will take over and the door will fly open rapidly/the slide will automatically inflate. If the slide fails to inflate there are manual inflation handles at each door.

Each flight attendant is assigned a door position by the In-Flight Manager/IFD prior to the flight. The f/A that is assigned the door is also the only f/a that can arm the door.

At the airline I work for, I (the In-flight Manager) make the call over the P.A to arm the doors. This is done after I have done a final walk around (checking for bags secure), all paperwork and head counts are done. I then go into the flight deck and ask the captain if I can close the door. As soon as he gives me permission to close, I do so. Usually, on the A-320, the 1L door is the only door that is open, however if we are a a down station that has boarding stairs for the aft too, we sometimes have the 2L door open too, in which case I ask the 2L F/A to close the door as soon as all the pax are on board. Same for the A-330. Boarding is done through 2L (usually). Sometimes 1L, 2L and 4L.

Rule of thumb,after doors are closed I look outside my window to ensure the finger or stairs have been moved away. We don't arm doors if the finger or stairs are still attached to the aircraft because if we needed to evacuate in a hurry, and the slides were armed, they would actually defeat the purpose; slides would blowagains the finger/stairs instead of dropping and inflating. So as soon as the stairs/jetaway is suficiently away from the a/c OR anytime the engines start up, I make the call to arm over the P.A. "Flight attendants prepare for departure and Cross Check please" Then I asrm my door by:

a) pulling the safety pin out of stowage (pin prevents slide from inflating unnecessesarily.
b) pushing the arming lever fully down
c) insterting the saftey pin
d) stand back to visually check the procedure is done
e) cross check my aisle partners door/they cross check my door and all the way through the cabin the same procedure is done.
f) make a conference call to all stations and say" All flight attendants should be facing their doors ensuring they are armed and cross checked". Then all f/a's identify their position on board and confirm the procedure is done. The flight deck has a computer which shows that the doors are armed/disarmed. When disarming the procxedure is reversed. Doors are disarmed when the engines are shut down and bridge or stairs are affixed to aircraft.

slide takes 4 secs. to inflate. Cheers!



User currently offlineLewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3592 posts, RR: 5
Reply 18, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 11421 times:

I have flown OA a lot of times. The captain or a chief FA are heard through the speakers saying: 'All doors to automatic and cross check please, cross check' before takeoff. This means that if the door is opened, the slides will automatically inflate. During approach, in order to cancel this function, they say "all doors to manual". They do that by opening a small cover on the door and pushing a lever in a certain position AUTO or MANUAL. There have been several mistakes here at Hellenikon in Athens. In an A340, a FA didn't put the door to MANUAL and the ground FA standing behind the door on the stairs was injured when the slide inflated in her face!(or so i was told by another FA, who is a friend of mine)

User currently offlineLewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3592 posts, RR: 5
Reply 19, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 11418 times:

No, i think the "doors to MAnual" thing is during taxi to the gate. A lot of things can happen during landing! Sorry for the mistake.

User currently offlineLewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3592 posts, RR: 5
Reply 20, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 11414 times:

Or is it when the aircraft has come to a complete stop at the gate. I just cant remember...

User currently offlineLewis From Greece, joined Jul 1999, 3592 posts, RR: 5
Reply 21, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days 4 hours ago) and read 11416 times:

All this was from OA's 747s Olympic A-340.

User currently offlineTriStar From Belgium, joined Oct 1999, 848 posts, RR: 1
Reply 22, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 11397 times:

Nice "I know it better than you, as always" attitude, Wing... I can advise you to go and check my post again; I am sure you can get it this time (if you catch my drift). Indeed, there are different policies at different airlines. No need to jump on someone's case because he described a policy different to your carrier's, am I correct?

In good understanding,

TriStar.


User currently offlineAJ From Australia, joined Nov 1999, 2381 posts, RR: 24
Reply 23, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 11391 times:

Our policy:
All doors armed at commencement of pushback, initiated by the CSM, and all doors 'callback' to the CSM on the intercom that their door is armed.
Doors remained armed until ordered disarmed by the F/O over the PA when taxying on to the bay.
On the 747 and 767 the doors are opened from the outside as this will automatically disarm and armed door.
Hope this helps  Smile/happy/getting dizzy


User currently offlineEI133 From Ireland, joined Jan 2000, 307 posts, RR: 0
Reply 24, posted (13 years 3 weeks 6 days ago) and read 11396 times:

On Aer lingus the senior cabin crew or cabin Manager depending on the aircraft gives the order:
Cabin crew prepare the aftdoors or doors for departure and cross check
On arrival the aannouncement is given prepare the aft doors/doors for arrival and cross check.
On ryanair the pre take off door check order is given by the cabin supervisor but on arrival it comes from the flight deck.My sister is a cabin crew on futura so I will ask her their protacol for their 734s and738s.EI133


25 Southern : When opening cabin doors, the F/A must hold the handle attached to the fuselage with their right hand while opening the handle with their left incase
26 Olympic A-340 : Yeah when I was flying on the Alitalia Airbus A-321 I now remember what the F/A was doing- thanx to all this information (I was in an exit row) First
27 Post contains links Demoose : This link is quite a good read about the proceedures for JMC Air, a UK charter airline. Its nothing too detailed, just a summary... http://www.jmc.com
28 Wing : Hi Tristar,First of all I am not here in this forum to show other people that I know something better than others and my post was not against yoursel
29 SA-JET : Worldtraveller Where on airliners.net did you get those great door photos? I tried cabin pictures, with keyword "doors" but nothing came up. Thanks
30 Post contains images TriStar : Alright Wing, that post was actually pretty funny. I suppose I was looking at your former post a bit too much from the harsh side, then...? It sounded
Top Of Page
Forum Index

This topic is archived and can not be replied to any more.

Printer friendly format

Similar topics:More similar topics...
American Commercial Aircraft In Africa And ME posted Sat May 15 2004 17:37:54 by ORBITJFK
Non-TLV Commercial Aircraft In Israeli Airspace posted Tue Feb 24 2004 11:43:40 by Shlomoz
Sars In An Aircraft Cabin posted Tue Apr 8 2003 20:48:11 by Kaitak
Day In The Life Of A Commercial Aircraft posted Mon Jan 7 2002 21:44:32 by Bobbydgg
Weight Variance In Like Aircraft posted Thu Oct 26 2006 06:32:06 by Qantas787
Cabin Crew Salaries In The UK posted Sun Oct 8 2006 13:38:18 by CY319
Any 737-200s In Scheduled Operations In The US? posted Sun Oct 1 2006 18:23:01 by Jlbmedia
What If LM Produced Commercial Aircraft posted Mon Sep 18 2006 05:27:39 by KSUpilot
Traffic Growth In Commercial Aviation Since 1940s? posted Thu Aug 24 2006 19:29:48 by A380900
Weeknesses In Commercial Flight posted Sat Aug 12 2006 08:26:33 by YWG
No Pilots In Commercial Aircraft? posted Tue Aug 14 2007 19:58:02 by Boeingluvr
Policies For Taking Pets In The Aircraft Cabin. posted Fri May 22 2009 20:16:35 by AT
What Are "recharging Points" In An Aircraft Cabin? posted Wed Mar 25 2009 03:59:24 by Vfw614
Smoking Sign In The Aircraft Cabin posted Sat Jan 12 2008 09:41:42 by Leigh pilgrim
Commercial Aircraft Development In Secret? posted Sat Mar 3 2007 15:10:58 by JAM747
Any Tristar L1011 Aircraft Operations In UK posted Sat Jan 20 2007 09:32:18 by Runway25
American Commercial Aircraft In Africa And ME posted Sat May 15 2004 17:37:54 by ORBITJFK
Non-TLV Commercial Aircraft In Israeli Airspace posted Tue Feb 24 2004 11:43:40 by Shlomoz
Sars In An Aircraft Cabin posted Tue Apr 8 2003 20:48:11 by Kaitak
Day In The Life Of A Commercial Aircraft posted Mon Jan 7 2002 21:44:32 by Bobbydgg
No Pilots In Commercial Aircraft? posted Tue Aug 14 2007 19:58:02 by Boeingluvr
Policies For Taking Pets In The Aircraft Cabin. posted Fri May 22 2009 20:16:35 by AT
What Are "recharging Points" In An Aircraft Cabin? posted Wed Mar 25 2009 03:59:24 by Vfw614
Smoking Sign In The Aircraft Cabin posted Sat Jan 12 2008 09:41:42 by Leigh pilgrim
Commercial Aircraft Development In Secret? posted Sat Mar 3 2007 15:10:58 by JAM747
Any Tristar L1011 Aircraft Operations In UK posted Sat Jan 20 2007 09:32:18 by Runway25
American Commercial Aircraft In Africa And ME posted Sat May 15 2004 17:37:54 by ORBITJFK
Non-TLV Commercial Aircraft In Israeli Airspace posted Tue Feb 24 2004 11:43:40 by Shlomoz
Sars In An Aircraft Cabin posted Tue Apr 8 2003 20:48:11 by Kaitak
Day In The Life Of A Commercial Aircraft posted Mon Jan 7 2002 21:44:32 by Bobbydgg