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Unusual NW Security Procedure At AMS  
User currently offlineViscount724 From Switzerland, joined Oct 2006, 24643 posts, RR: 22
Posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3086 times:

While waiting for a connecting flight at AMS yesterday, I was sitting for about an hour near a window that was very close to a NW 757-200 preparing for departure. I noted a ground employee that I assumed was probably a KLM supervisor (wearing a yellow reflective vest over a blue suit) wandering around the vicinity of the aircraft. Then about 15 minutes later a KLM catering truck drove up and positioned itself at the forward galley door of the 752.

When the driver of the catering truck got out of the truck, the other person in the yellow vest walked over and took a piece of paper from the driver, then walked to the back of the truck and was obviously comparing some numbers on the paper with some identification on the back of the truck. Then he walked back to the driver, handed back the paper, and then proceeded to frisk the driver. So he was obviously a security guard of some type. It appeared to be a standard procedure as the catering driver just put his arms out at his sides and he was then patted down like it wasn't anything unusual. He then proceeded to offload the catering supplies into the aircraft.

I have seen similar security procedures at airports served by El Al but had never seen that kind of thing done on other flights. I had to leave before they started loading baggage but was curious whether the security guard would also frisk the baggage loaders before they started working. A KLM fuelling truck drove up and connected to the underground hydrant system and started fuelling the 752 but the security guard ignored him.

I wonder if that procedure at AMS applies only to NW flights, or possibly to all flights to the USA by all airlines? There were 3 or 4 other NW aircraft (all A330s) parked at the terminal but I couldn't see whether each of them had their own security person like the NW 757 I was watching.

5 replies: All unread, jump to last
 
User currently offlineNorthstarBoy From United States of America, joined Jun 2005, 1824 posts, RR: 0
Reply 1, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3047 times:
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I would guess that it applies to all US bound flights. I'd guess the paper was a catering manifest, listing exactly what was to be catered, it's probably standard procedure to make sure that the number of the truck and the number of the truck on the manifest match. (when i worked at Target, there was a similar standard procedure, the supervisor on duty would look over the paperwork of an arriving supply truck to make sure that the numbers on the truck matched the numbers on the form) Likewise, frisking down the driver is likely also standard procedure, since he's entering the aircraft from a "non secure" location, i.e. he probably came from a catering center which possibly does not have metal detectors or other security screening equipment, they have to make sure that he's not carrying any "surprises" on him that can be placed somewhere on the aircraft for access by later individuals. I also would not be surprised if the security officers are given time frames as to when the truck will arrive, how long catering will take and when the truck will leave, so if the truck comes too early or too late or catering takes too long or not long enough, a red flag pops up.

just my 2 cents



Why are people so against low yields?! If lower yields means more people can travel abroad, i'm all for it
User currently offlineDingDong From United States of America, joined Jan 2007, 661 posts, RR: 0
Reply 2, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 3025 times:



Quoting Viscount724 (Thread starter):
I have seen similar security procedures at airports served by El Al but had never seen that kind of thing done on other flights. I had to leave before they started loading baggage but was curious whether the security guard would also frisk the baggage loaders before they started working. A KLM fuelling truck drove up and connected to the underground hydrant system and started fuelling the 752 but the security guard ignored him.

Admittedly uninformed, but would guess the assumption was being that it's not very likely the fueler would have had snuck something onboard (that could be then retrieved and used by another onboard confederate), while the caterer and ground handling agents could.



DingDong, honey, please answer the doorbell!
User currently offlineSLCPilot From United States of America, joined Aug 2003, 578 posts, RR: 3
Reply 3, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 10 hours ago) and read 2984 times:

I worry about aviation and the US. The country has been very fortunate since 9/11. It doesn't take much effort to imagine something bad around this season. If these are procedures around El Al, it makes me wonder if they're in place due to a real or perceived threat against US carriers.

Fly Safe Everybody, and Merry Christmas!

SLCPilot



I don't like to be fueled by anger, I don't like to be fooled by lust...
User currently offlineTristarSteve From Sweden, joined Nov 2005, 3971 posts, RR: 34
Reply 4, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2706 times:



Quoting SLCPilot (Reply 3):
it makes me wonder if they're in place due to a real or perceived threat against US carriers.

This is nothing new. As long ago as 1987 I was working on TWA B767 departing for JFK. Everybody that entered the aircraft was frisked, and it still goes on today. It is not only US airlines, it is all flights bound for the USA.
When I have a defect on the aircraft, and am running in and out of the aircraft, it gets very tiresome to be frisked every time. When departure time is approaching and I get stopped with handfulls of tools, it really raises the stress levels!

El Al is different. Their security knows all the staff who work their aircraft. They react to strangers. Much more relaxed to work on them.


User currently offlineFlyinTLow From Germany, joined Oct 2004, 519 posts, RR: 0
Reply 5, posted (5 years 6 months 3 weeks 4 days 1 hour ago) and read 2671 times:

He was most likely comparing the seal number. As at some airports the catering "terminal" is not 100% inside the security area (for example, trucks have to drive outside the apron area for a little bit, etc.) the trucks get sealed when the loading is finished and then reopened again at the aircraft. This ensures that nothing or noone can get inside the catering truck which could be a security breach. Happens at FRA as well for example.

Checking the papers explicitly most likely an American and prolly also British airline thing... And as assumed before, you are checked and patted down only if you have access to the passenger cabin. Fuelers, Lavatory service, technicians that only have to work outside the cabin, etc., they all get away!

Cheers



- When dreams take flight, follow them -
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